Litteris
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Litteris
Reading and Writing in Digital Contexts. Leitura e produção textual em contextos digitais
Curated by Luciana Viter
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6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing

6 Things Alfred Hitchcock Can Teach You About Writing | Litteris | Scoop.it
“ Alfred Hitchcock was an English film director and producer who worked closely with screenwriters on his films. The master storyteller, born 13 August 1899, died 29 April 1980.”

Via elearning hoje, Shannon Bolithoe , Penelope, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Penelope's curator insight, August 16, 2016 12:44 PM
Alfred Hitchcock had the scream theme down pat. These tips, however, could apply to any writing genre to give it a new heartbeat. Great ideas!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

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How the Brain Reacts to Scrambled Stories

How the Brain Reacts to Scrambled Stories | Litteris | Scoop.it
Research shows that people tend to prefer linear narratives, but can also be engaged by just the right amount of disruption.

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JAMES SCOTT BELL - Obtendo idéias para sua história e roteiro

Os melhores vinte e um caminhos para se conseguir uma ideia retirado do livro Plot and Structure.
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Afinal, o Final

Afinal, o Final | Litteris | Scoop.it
Por Gustavo Araujo
Naturalmente, um título bem pensado não é garantia de um texto de qualidade. Da mesma forma, um título horrível poderá iniciar uma história excelente. Há diversos exemplos nesse sentido.
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Parts Of Story: How To Create Suspense

Parts Of Story: How To Create Suspense | Litteris | Scoop.it
What is suspense and how is it created? Lee Goldberg once said that, "Suspense is an escalating sense of apprehension or fear, a building of pressure, heading either towards an uncertain conclusion or a horrifyingly certain one." Either way, the...
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Why Quieter Stakes Are Easier to Plot With

Why Quieter Stakes Are Easier to Plot With | Litteris | Scoop.it

Stakes are part of the holy trinity of writing (goals-conflicts-stakes), and because if that, a lot of the advice given is on raising them as high as possible. Don't get me wrong, this is good advice, but it dawned on me recently that quieter stakes might actually be easier to write.


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5 Ways To Improve A Perfect Story

5 Ways To Improve A Perfect Story | Litteris | Scoop.it

You’ve written a story you’re proud of.

 

You’ve edited it until there’s nothing left to do. It’s perfect!

 

Isn’t it?

 

Of course.

 

But how can you enhance it?


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What Are Plot Points?

What Are Plot Points? | Litteris | Scoop.it
Plot points are essential in storytelling. Find out what plot points are and how to use them effectively in your stories.
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Discovering Your Story: 5 Ways to Find the Missing Pieces

Discovering Your Story: 5 Ways to Find the Missing Pieces | Litteris | Scoop.it
Ali Luke shares five valuable methods for finding the missing pieces in the story you're writing.
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How to Plot With the Three-Act Structure

How to Plot With the Three-Act Structure | Litteris | Scoop.it


These big-picture structure formats can be incredibly helpful in plotting a novel, because they give you hard plot goals to aim for. Even if you're a pantser, structure formats can help during revisions when you have a first draft done and want to make sure all your plot points are working right.


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How to grab, delight or shock your readers right from the start

How to grab, delight or shock your readers right from the start | Litteris | Scoop.it

The first pages of your story create an instant impression of its quality and value. Agents, acquisition editors, reviewers and potential buyers standing in a store or scanning the First Pages feature on Amazon – are all going to keep reading or skip to the next candidate, depending on how they respond to your opening.

 

As a developmental editor, I often work with authors to reconstruct, revise, and create completely new openings. It’s a challenge editors face often, and it’s one of the most essential. Here are some of the main issues and how to solve them.

 


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How to Write a Good Story: You’ll Love This Simple Method

How to Write a Good Story: You’ll Love This Simple Method | Litteris | Scoop.it
A great story might be hiding right under your nose.

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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, June 1, 2016 10:24 PM
Very simple but effective way of finding a plot for your story.
April Laramey's curator insight, December 13, 2016 9:35 PM
Very simple but effective way of finding a plot for your story.
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Life doesn't come with trigger warnings. Why should books?

Life doesn't come with trigger warnings. Why should books? | Litteris | Scoop.it
The outside world is full of triggers. If I don’t warn you of one it’s not out of malice Continue reading...

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 19, 2015 9:27 PM

Life is full of uncertainty and good literature is, as well.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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The Power of Story Compels You

The Power of Story Compels You | Litteris | Scoop.it

A story with high stakes and deadly dangers can still bore you to tears. Equally, a character folding laundry while contemplating life’s absurdities can be deeply moving and affecting. 

 

While there’s probably more to work with if your story is about an exploding volcano than creased shirts and an ironing board, the fact that neither subject-matter guarantees how the story will be received demonstrates that whatever it is that draws readers into a tale, it isn’t just a matter of sticking a character in a perilous situation and seeing how they cope. 

 

So what is it that grabs a reader and keeps them engaged through many hundreds of pages?


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Should Secondary Characters Change?

Should Secondary Characters Change? | Litteris | Scoop.it

There are some good reasons to keep secondary characters (both friend and foe) fixed in how you represent them in a story. 

 

A lot of these kinds of characters  aren’t going to be in the story all that much and they have specific roles to play. Whether it’s to move the plot along or reveal aspects of the main character, playing a supporting role doesn’t always benefit from too much fiddling. 

 

You also don’t want to confuse the reader with a constantly changing cast that makes it hard to remember who’s who. Nor do you want to steal focus from the main players by going off on a tangent. But then, you also don’t want to create a roster of one-dimensional automatons who walk on to the page to deliver the same old shtick every time, like a bad sitcom. 

 

So how do you balance the two? And do you need to?


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Characterization Or Plot: Which Is Most Important To Readers?

Characterization Or Plot: Which Is Most Important To Readers? | Litteris | Scoop.it
The other day I watched a video of Lee Child talking about writing. It was a question and answer period and someone asked how he got in touch with his character, Jack Reacher. They asked how he knew Reacher's likes, wants, needs, fears, and so on.
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Karen Woodward: Short Story Structures: Several Ways Of Structuring Short Fiction

Karen Woodward: Short Story Structures: Several Ways Of Structuring Short Fiction | Litteris | Scoop.it
Writing a novel is difficult, but it's nothing compared to writing a short story. In this article I explore several ways of structuring short fiction.
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ReadWriteThink: Student Materials: Plot Diagram

The Plot Diagram is an organizational tool focusing on a pyramid or triangular shape, which is used to map the events in a story.

 

Sarah McElrath's insight:

Good way to help students think through plot.


Via Sarah McElrath, Jim Lerman
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, March 26, 2014 1:50 PM

Good way to help students think through plot.

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Gibicultura - Elementos de Estória

Gibicultura - Elementos de Estória | Litteris | Scoop.it
Achei a imagem uma analogia interessante, como a de um passeio na montanha russa, mas que é um exemplo visual que se encaixa perfeitamente nos parâmetros de explicações dadas a respeito de estrutur...
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The Narrative Prompt Story Glove

Love Pinterest. #pinterest #writing #teach #teachprimary #teachwriting
busybees_resources's photo on Instagram

 

Intersting and useful graphic; supplement with this 4-step tool:

Someone...

Wanted...

But...

So...


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Story First, Writing Second – Especially Come November

Story First, Writing Second – Especially Come November | Litteris | Scoop.it

Here’s what most writers do, and why they fail: They come up with an interesting character and an interesting situation, and then they start writing to see where it’ll go. They figure that both the story and the character will come clear to them as they write. What they end up with is a narrative that’s basically just a bunch of things that happen.


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Getting to the Core Idea in Your Novel

Getting to the Core Idea in Your Novel | Litteris | Scoop.it

As we continue on with exploring cinematic secrets that can supercharge your novel, we’re going to focus on something that is crucial to filmmakers, and that is getting a clear vision for the story. Novelists, just like filmmakers, need to truly understand the story they are trying to tell and what impact or take-home feeling or message they want to leave with their readers. Just coming up with a neat idea for a novel is only the first step, and is no guarantee they will have a terrific book.

 


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