Litteris
8.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Litteris
Reading and Writing in Digital Contexts. Leitura e produção textual em contextos digitais
Curated by Luciana Viter
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from ESL snippets
Scoop.it!

Transcript of "Metaphorically speaking"

Transcript of "Metaphorically speaking" | Litteris | Scoop.it
TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript: Aphorism enthusiast and author James Geary waxes on a fascinating fixture of human language: the metaphor. Friend of scribes from Aristotle to Elvis, metaphor can subtly influence the decisions we make, Geary says.

Via S. Lustenhouwer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Using Educational Technology for Adult ELT
Scoop.it!

Language Game Inspired by Noam Chomsky's Linguistics | Big Think

Language Game Inspired by Noam Chomsky's Linguistics | Big Think | Litteris | Scoop.it

A new smartphone app gives a clever nod to Noam Chomsky while giving players just enough inspiration to create some pretty funny sentences.


Via Rita Simons Santiago
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

Noam Chomsky: 'Language Use and Design: conflicts and their significance'

04 April 2013 - Noam Chomsky - 'Language Use and Design: conflicts and their significance' Full story: http://www.ucd.ie/news/2013/04APR13/030413-Noam-Chomsk...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

Now online: the historic Chomsky-Foucault debate | ROAR Magazine

Now online: the historic Chomsky-Foucault debate | ROAR Magazine | Litteris | Scoop.it
Excerpts from the Foucault-Chomsky debate on human nature and power have circulated online for years — now it’s available in full for the first time.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from New Web 2.0 tools for education
Scoop.it!

General Linguistics - Internet Resources

General Linguistics - Internet Resources | Litteris | Scoop.it
Links to resources for linguistics

Via Kathleen Cercone
more...
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

Books Teun A. van Dijk

Homepage of Teun A. van Dijk, professor Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona. Critical Discourse Analysis.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

Where does language come from?

Where does language come from? | Litteris | Scoop.it
➱ “Almost no one, from lay people to linguists, really knows how meaning works.

That is, until recently. This is the age of cognitive science. Using fine measures of reaction time, eye gaze, and hand movement, as well as brain imaging and other state-of-the-art tools, we’ve started to scrutinize humans in the act of communicating. We can now peer inside the mind and thereby put meaning in its rightful place at the center of the study of language and the mind. With these new tools, we’ve managed to catch a glimpse of meaning in action, and the result is revolutionary. The way meaning works is much richer, more complex, and more personal than we ever would have predicted.”

➱ “Starting as early as the 1970s, some cognitive psychologists, philosophers, and linguists began to wonder whether meaning wasn’t something totally different from a language of thought. They suggested that — instead of abstract symbols — meaning might really be something much more closely intertwined with our real experiences in the world, with the bodies that we have. As a self-conscious movement started to take form, it took on a name, embodiment, which started to stand for the idea that meaning might be something that isn’t distilled away from our bodily experiences but is instead tightly bound by them.

It’s not clear who had the idea first, but in the mid-1990s at least three groups converged upon the same thought. The idea was the embodied simulation hypothesis, a proposal that would make the idea of embodiment concrete enough to compete with Mentalese. Put simply: Maybe we understand language by simulating in our minds what it would be like to experience the things that the language describes.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from World Englishes
Scoop.it!

Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

Steven Pinker - Psychologist, Cognitive Scientist, and Linguist at Harvard University How did humans acquire language? In this lecture, best-selling author S...
Via Athanasios Karavasilis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

Language use is simpler than previously thought, study suggests

Language use is simpler than previously thought, study suggests | Litteris | Scoop.it
For more than 50 years, language scientists have assumed that sentence structure is fundamentally hierarchical, made up of small parts in turn made of smaller parts, like Russian nesting dolls.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

Understanding Discourse – Grice and Implicatures Part 1

Understanding Discourse – Grice and Implicatures Part 1 | Litteris | Scoop.it
Ever since my last blogpost about discourse, I have been receiving requests to delve a little deeper into the area of pragmatics. It reminded me that a previous BESIG interview about pragmatics and...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

RSA Animate - Language as a Window into Human Nature

Compartilhe seus vídeos com seus amigos, com sua família e com o mundo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts | Litteris | Scoop.it

A 'retronym' is a term specifying the original meaning of word after a newer meaning has overtaken it.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 3, 2014 9:06 AM

unit 3

God Is.'s curator insight, May 3, 2014 1:15 PM

Some of you might appreciate this article.. Darn I feel old! LOL

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, May 6, 2014 8:32 PM

Fantastic images for our modern day terms.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Leadership Think Tank
Scoop.it!

Is It Possible To Think Without Language?

Is It Possible To Think Without Language? | Litteris | Scoop.it
Language is so deeply embedded in almost every aspect of the way we interact with the world. What would our thoughts be like without it?

Via Nik Peachey, Aki Puustinen
more...
OneSpring's curator insight, May 26, 2013 9:25 PM
Not strictly visualization... BUT very fascinating!
Mabel A. Opare - Ababio Ayita's comment, May 29, 2013 8:29 AM
Yes but it's really possible and fascinating indeed.
REMI BLUM-JONQUIERES's comment, May 29, 2013 11:04 AM
I believe that we can think using kind of emotions and visualizations. Maybe it is a universal communication like we can have in dreams
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Humanities and their Algorithmic Revolution
Scoop.it!

Computer recreates ancient languages

Computer recreates ancient languages | Litteris | Scoop.it
Scientists develop a computer program that can reconstruct long-dead languages, making quick work of what would take human linguists far longer.

Via Intriguing Networks, Pierre Levy
more...
Intriguing Networks's curator insight, February 17, 2013 1:56 PM

How cool is that...Ancient Languages reconstructed online...

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Creative Tools... and ESL
Scoop.it!

Voyant Tools: Reveal Your Texts

Voyant Tools: Reveal Your Texts | Litteris | Scoop.it

This is a very interesting tool for analysing text and word frequency in text. It enables you to create your own mini corpus and see how words are used in context.


Via Nik Peachey, Ricard Garcia
more...
Randy Rebman's curator insight, December 15, 2012 7:54 PM

This tool allows you to easily export the concordance lines into a text file. Provided the text was either online or in a text file, it also makes identifying vocabulary words in texts easier. As a corpus tool on the web, I find the option of being able to upload multiple texts into the corpus one of the benefits of the site. But this tool is still in Beta mode, so there may still be some kinks with it that need worked out.

Bill.Rutter's curator insight, March 26, 2013 12:21 PM

text analysis - IELTS?

Lina Morgado's curator insight, April 25, 2013 3:33 AM

For research

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from World Englishes
Scoop.it!

Sociolinguistics - Language, Dialect, Variety

This video discusses the different approaches towards language, dialect, and variety. It provides several criteria of language definition as well as numerous...
Via Athanasios Karavasilis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Ideias
Scoop.it!

Applying information theory to linguistics

Researchers believe that information theory — the discipline that gave us digital communication — can explain differences between human languages.

Via Maria Margarida Correia
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from AprendiTIC
Scoop.it!

Understanding Illiteracy | Visual.ly

Understanding Illiteracy | Visual.ly | Litteris | Scoop.it
As education becomes more available throughout the U.S. and the world at large, illiteracy rates are steadily declining.

Via Zélia Santos (zeliams)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

The complexities of simple: What simple language proponents should know about linguistics | Metaphor Hacker

The complexities of simple: What simple language proponents should know about linguistics | Metaphor Hacker | Litteris | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

What exactly is corpus linguistics? « From Words to Deeds

What exactly is corpus linguistics? « From Words to Deeds | Litteris | Scoop.it

“First of all, a definition: a corpus is a collection of texts, often used to study language. These days, corpora are generally held electronically – access is much faster and analysis can be more powerful.

 

Corpora have a considerable history. The very first corpora date back to ancient times – one example is the Hippocratic Corpus of Ancient Greek – a collection of medical texts. Another well-known corpus was used by Dr Johnson to produce his Dictionary of the English Language - it was based on quotations from famous authors, copied onto slips of paper, becoming part of a huge filing system (the ‘corpus’).

 

The first book dedicated to the subject was written by Aarts and Meijs in 1984. Corpus linguistics has developed quickly in recent decades due to the great possibilities offered by computerized processing of natural language. Corpus linguistics is, however, not the same as obtaining language data through the use of computers. Corpus linguistics is the study and analysis of data obtained from a corpus.”

more...
No comment yet.