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Litteris
New Languages and Readings in Digital Contexts. Novas Linguagens e Leituras em Contextos Digitais.
Curated by Luciana Viter
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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You Can't Defend Public Libraries and Oppose File-Sharing | Rick Falkvinge | TorrentFreak

You Can't Defend Public Libraries and Oppose File-Sharing | Rick Falkvinge | TorrentFreak | Litteris | Scoop.it

Public libraries started appearing in the mid-1800s. At the time, publishers went absolutely berserk: they had been lobbying for the lending of books to become illegal, as reading a book without paying anything first was “stealing”, they argued. As a consequence, they considered private libraries at the time to be hotbeds of crime and robbery. (Those libraries were so-called “subscription libraries”, so they were argued to be for-profit, too.)

British Parliament at the time, unlike today’s politicians, wisely disagreed with the publishing industry lobby – the copyright industry of the time. Instead, they saw the economic value in an educated and cultural populace, and passed a law allowing free public libraries in 1850, so that local libraries were built throughout Britain, where the public could take part of knowledge and culture for free.

In other words, they made explicit exceptions to the copyright monopoly for the benefit of public access to culture and knowledge. In most copyright monopoly legislation today, it says explicitly that monopoly holders to not have any kind of right to object to their works being displayed, read, and lent from public libraries. This can be traced back to the insights of 1850.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Digimarc Explains the Evolution of Social DRM in eBooks

Digimarc Explains the Evolution of Social DRM in eBooks | Litteris | Scoop.it

MThe European publishing industry has firmly embraced social DRM or digital watermark technology to protect and secure their eBook content. Many of the leading online bookstores in the Netherlands and Poland have been distributing books in this fashion for over five years.


Via booqlab
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Leituras Digitais
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Everything Old Is Unavailable Again: How Copyright Has Ebooks Operating In The 1800s | Techdirt

Everything Old Is Unavailable Again: How Copyright Has Ebooks Operating In The 1800s | Techdirt | Litteris | Scoop.it
Nothing sucks more than a great new technology with old-world thinking attached to it. Such has been the case with ebooks, unfortunately, with antiquated views on DRM, pricing, and storefront protectionism resulting in pissed off customers and...

Via Ricardo Lourenço
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Google Book-Scanning Case: Judge Finds "Fair Use"

Google Book-Scanning Case: Judge Finds "Fair Use" | Litteris | Scoop.it
The long-running copyright fight between Google and the Authors Guild is over: Judge Denny Chin issued a resounding ruling in favor of fair use.

Via Ed Stenson
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Acesso ao Conteúdo

Saiba mais sobre as liberdades na rede e venha se envolver no documentário colaborativo que está em construção na web: www.freenetfilm.org @freenetfilm http:...
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The Teacher's Guide To Copyright And Fair Use - Edudemic

The Teacher's Guide To Copyright And Fair Use - Edudemic | Litteris | Scoop.it
The teacher's guide to copyright is meant to be a useful addition to any teacher's understanding of how and where to use resources.
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Legal Issues in Self-Publishing: What Authors Need to Know | The Passive Voice

Legal Issues in Self-Publishing: What Authors Need to Know | The Passive Voice | Litteris | Scoop.it
From The Huffington Post: Self-publishing continues its exponential growth.
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Leyendo sobre la historia del copyright

Leyendo sobre la historia del copyright | Litteris | Scoop.it
Sigo el blog de Rick Falkvinge desde hace ya bastante tiempo, pero no había leído entera (y mucho menos toda seguida) su fantástica serie sobre la historia del copyright, siete capítulos escritos a principios del pasado 2011.
Via Sonia C. Alonso
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Domínio público: o 'Pequeno Príncipe' é de (quase) todos

Domínio público: o 'Pequeno Príncipe' é de (quase) todos | Litteris | Scoop.it

O caso mais polêmico deste ano é o ingresso em domínio público do "O Pequeno Príncipe", um dos maiores fenômenos editoriais de todos os tempos. Para o ano que vem, esperem ainda mais polêmica.

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FAQ Lei da cópia privada #pl118

Fui desafiada, no Twitter, a escrever uma FAQ sobre a lei da cópia privada. Vou-me esquecer de muita coisa, pelo agradeço desde já que contribuam com perguntas, nos comentários, no Twitter, como quiserem, para eu ir acrescentando. Foi parcialmente inspirad...

Via Ricardo Lourenço
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Liderança em downloads ilegais 'é melhor que Emmy' para Time Warner - 19/01/2014 - Ilustrada - Folha de S.Paulo

Liderança em downloads ilegais 'é melhor que Emmy' para Time Warner - 19/01/2014 - Ilustrada - Folha de S.Paulo | Litteris | Scoop.it
Aos poucos, Hollywood aprende a parar de se preocupar e a amar a pirataria.
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Share Writing Online Safely: 5 Methods

Share Writing Online Safely: 5 Methods | Litteris | Scoop.it
5 ways you can share your writing online without falling into the “previously published writing” trap. (Want to share your writing online but avoid the slippery slope of “previously published”?
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The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish

The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish | Litteris | Scoop.it
A book published during the presidency of Chester A. Arthur has a greater chance of being in print today than one published during the time of Reagan. (RT @xPat_Letters: Wow!

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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The corridor of uncertainty: Can you own a digital purchase?

The corridor of uncertainty: Can you own a digital purchase? | Litteris | Scoop.it

If I buy a book, a music CD or a DVD movie I own it and when I get tired of it I am free to sell it to someone else. This principle of ownership seems simple enough but in the digital world it suddenly ceases to apply. An article by Dan Gillmor in the Guardian, In our digital world you don't own stuff, you just license it, describes a recent American court ruling against a start-up, ReDigi, who proposed to start a market for people to resell digital music.


Via Alastair Creelman
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Copyright, IP and European Law
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Can Copyrighted Works Purchased Abroad Be Resold In the United States?

Can Copyrighted Works Purchased Abroad Be Resold In the United States? | Litteris | Scoop.it
Next week, the Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., a case that will have fundamental consequences for the global flow of books, music, movies, and other copyrighted material.

Foreign students studying in the U.S. have long known that textbooks can often be purchased much less expensively in their home countries. Supap Kirtsaeng, who originally came to the United States from Thailand as a student in 1997, built a business around this arbitrage opportunity, asking family members in Thailand to legally purchase textbooks and ship them to the United States, where he then resold them for a profit on sites such as eBay. In September 2008, publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. filed a complaint in a New York federal district court asserting, among other things, that Kirtsaeng’s actions constituted copyright infringement. A jury agreed, imposing damages of $75,000 for each infringed work. Kirtsaeng appealed to the Second Circuit, which affirmed the district court’s decision, and then to the Supreme Court, which will hear oral arguments on October 29.


Via Paulo Tomás Neves
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Madeline Smyth: Writing and the Law, Part III: Pen Names, Copyrights, and Business Entities

Madeline Smyth: Writing and the Law, Part III: Pen Names, Copyrights, and Business Entities | Litteris | Scoop.it
Madeline provides a wealth of information for writers to consider regarding copyrighting their work.
Via Roxanne Ravenel
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