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Litteris
New Languages and Readings in Digital Contexts. Novas Linguagens e Leituras em Contextos Digitais.
Curated by Luciana Viter
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These Scholars Have Been Pointing Out Atticus Finch's Racism for Years | Laura Marsh | New Republic

These Scholars Have Been Pointing Out Atticus Finch's Racism for Years | Laura Marsh | New Republic | Litteris | Scoop.it

The portrayal of Atticus Finch, the lawyer hero of To Kill A Mockingbird, as a racist in Harper Lee’s new novel, Go Set A Watchman, has been variously described as a “bombshell,” “shocking” and a “revelation” in early reviews. The New York Times suggested that the new novel “could also reshape Ms. Lee’s legacy.”

 

Yet scholars who have written on race and the legal system in To Kill A Mockingbird are less surprised. “If you read the book from a racial justice perspective,” Katie Rose Guest Pryal, a novelist and former law professor, commented, “it wouldn’t surprise you that this is who Atticus is.”

In fact, there is a well-established body of scholarship on To Kill A Mockingbird that draws attention to flaws in Atticus’s character.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Heart of Success? Compelling Characters: 3 Storytelling Lessons

Heart of Success? Compelling Characters: 3 Storytelling Lessons | Litteris | Scoop.it
To perfect your brand of storytelling, you need to become a master of character development. Here are three lessons you can't miss.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 23, 3:04 PM

What a great post Ted Karczewski @TeddyHK wrote about what creates fabulous stories. The secret is in creating fabulous characters.


I agree. Here are 3 solid how-to tips for crafting successful business stories by focusing on the characters.


As Ted says, "Characters are the heart and soul of a good story. In order to become an effective brand storyteller, you first need to identify and develop your main characters. Here’s how:..."


Enjoy this piece and focus on your characters. You'll be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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12 Character Writing Tips for Fiction Writers | Writing Forward

12 Character Writing Tips for Fiction Writers | Writing Forward | Litteris | Scoop.it
Use these character writing tips as a checklist to see if your characters possess all the depth and complexity of real people.

Via Ms Webster
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Writing in Deep POV

Writing in Deep POV | Litteris | Scoop.it
Deep POV brings your reader and your character closer together. Learn one surefire technique to go deep and bridge the gap.
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Ghosts in the machine: how AI research is bringing game characters to life

Ghosts in the machine: how AI research is bringing game characters to life | Litteris | Scoop.it
In an era of crowd-sourced machine intelligence, games may be about to do what authors have been trying to do for centuries
The ambition to create real, believable characters has been a cornerstone of literature since the 19th century.

Via Monica S Mcfeeters
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Don't Be Afraid To Let Your Characters Talk - Understanding Introspection

I do believe that writers lately have been taught to be afraid of narration. You know what I am talking about - those lengthy paragraphs that do nothing more than to "slow the story down." Writers have been pounded so much with the idea of show don't tell and that we have to always keep the story moving forward. Narration and lengthy introspection is simply not going to do it.


Via mooderino
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Should Secondary Characters Change?

Should Secondary Characters Change? | Litteris | Scoop.it

There are some good reasons to keep secondary characters (both friend and foe) fixed in how you represent them in a story. 

 

A lot of these kinds of characters  aren’t going to be in the story all that much and they have specific roles to play. Whether it’s to move the plot along or reveal aspects of the main character, playing a supporting role doesn’t always benefit from too much fiddling. 

 

You also don’t want to confuse the reader with a constantly changing cast that makes it hard to remember who’s who. Nor do you want to steal focus from the main players by going off on a tangent. But then, you also don’t want to create a roster of one-dimensional automatons who walk on to the page to deliver the same old shtick every time, like a bad sitcom. 

 

So how do you balance the two? And do you need to?


Via mooderino
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The "Come, Cliche, Crackdown" Approach to Character Development

The "Come, Cliche, Crackdown" Approach to Character Development | Litteris | Scoop.it
There is no one way, or a "correct" way, to go about crafting your characters: especially your supporting characters. I know that I don't even go about character development in a uniform manner fro...

Via Lynne Fellows
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The Thing Your Character Wants vs. The Thing Your Character Needs

The Thing Your Character Wants vs. The Thing Your Character Needs | Litteris | Scoop.it

The Lie Your Character Believes is the reason for all character arcs. After all, if everything’s hunky-dunky, why change? We might think of the Lie as the cavity in a tooth. Everything might look shiny and white on the outside, but inside there’s decay. If the character is ever to be happy, he’s going to have to do some drilling to excavate the rot in his life.

 


Via mooderino
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Creating Characters with Invisible Disabilities

Creating Characters with Invisible Disabilities | Litteris | Scoop.it
They’re all around us—people with invisible disabilities. Maybe you’re one of them; maybe your doctor or your best friend or your mother struggles with clinical depression. Maybe your son, like mine, battles obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
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How Minor Characters Help You Discover Theme

How Minor Characters Help You Discover Theme | Litteris | Scoop.it

Is theme the moral of a story? Is it the message an author wants to share? Or is it something more inherent to the plot itself?


Via mooderino
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Moods and Adjectives chart

Moods and Adjectives chart | Litteris | Scoop.it
A writers best friend.

Via Marylin Alvarez, Juergen Wagner, Begoña Iturgaitz
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Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, December 3, 2013 3:34 AM

Truly helpful chart for secondary students

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Creating Characters - Five Mistakes Beginner Writers Make

Creating Characters - Five Mistakes Beginner Writers Make | Litteris | Scoop.it
I am often asked to appraise writers’ manuscripts. I have found that these are the most common problems beginner writers share when they're creating characters.

1. Cardboard cut-out...
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5 Reasons Atticus Finch is an Inadvertent Badass

5 Reasons Atticus Finch is an Inadvertent Badass | Litteris | Scoop.it
Here a few reasons Atticus Finch from Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is a badass
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How to Create a Strong Emotional Response in Your Readers

How to Create a Strong Emotional Response in Your Readers | Litteris | Scoop.it
Often the books that end up on best-seller lists carry a heavy emotional punch. Books that lack emotionality fall flat. When that emotionality isn’t infused in our work, our characters fall flat. The work as a whole can fall flat, and unfortunately the result will be unmemorable novel.

Via mooderino
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What Makes Your Characters Uncomfortable?

What Makes Your Characters Uncomfortable? | Litteris | Scoop.it
Everyone has their hot buttons topics--the ones that get their blood boiling, or makes their skin crawl, or triggers an inappropriate response to the situation. While this isn't much fun to encounter in real life, it's a great way to create conflict and tension in a novel. Pushing someone's hot button (either accidentally or on purpose) can cause a character to act in ways they otherwise wouldn't.

Via mooderino
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6 Tips to Choosing the Right Point of View |

Nancy Kress the WD fiction columnist describes first-person, third-person and distant third-person pointof view (POV) and explains how to choose the best one for your short story.
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Sherlock Holmes: dispelling the myths

Sherlock Holmes: dispelling the myths | Litteris | Scoop.it
We think we know all about Conan Doyle's immortal detective, with his pipes, dressing-gown and cocaine – but do we really, asks Sam Leith

Via Sandra V. Barbosa
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Preparing To Write A Story: Characters

Preparing To Write A Story: Characters | Litteris | Scoop.it
Today I continue writing about science fiction and fantasy author Michael Moorcock and his guidelines for writing a 45,000 to 60,000 word novel in three days.
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Crafting Interesting Characters

Crafting Interesting Characters | Litteris | Scoop.it
No one wants to write boring characters, but what qualities do interesting characters have? In this article I explore five qualities that can make your characters jump off the page: exaggeration, exotic setting, active introduction, truth-likeness and empathy.

Via mooderino, Jim Lerman
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KindredReaders's curator insight, March 31, 2014 11:33 AM

Karen includes lots of good examples to illustrate her points. I second her recommendation to read the posts on scenes and sequels.

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The Three Dimensions of Character

The Three Dimensions of Character | Litteris | Scoop.it

If you want to write a character from the ground up, a character who is as real as any person living, yet wholly your own creation, then there are three aspects you need to know in depth: the physical, sociological and psychological.


Via mooderino
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, March 27, 2014 8:50 AM

Great way to know your characters well enough to predict what they would or wouldn't do in any given situation.

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Why Your Antagonist Needs a Mushy Moment

Why Your Antagonist Needs a Mushy Moment | Litteris | Scoop.it

When it comes to writing our antagonist, we face a dichotomy: we want them to be bad, but we also want them to be three-dimensional, faceted human beings. In short, we want to create bad guys who aren’t all bad, bad guys whom readers will still be able to find a spark of sympathy for, a smidgen of relatability. As a result, we can sometimes end up creating bad guys who aren’t bad enough.


Via mooderino
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I know who the book-ish girls always fall for

I know who the book-ish girls always fall for | Litteris | Scoop.it
J. K. Rowling caused quite a stir recently when she was quoted as saying Ron and Hermione shouldn’t have ended up together in the Harry Potter series. Most fans of the book were shocked.
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Getting Into Character: Fiction Writing Exercises

Getting Into Character: Fiction Writing Exercises | Litteris | Scoop.it
Fiction writing exercises for developing characters.
Writers are not actors, but sometimes we need to get into character.
To truly understand the nature of a character, a writer must step into that character’s shoes.
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The top 10 unsinkable characters in literature

The top 10 unsinkable characters in literature | Litteris | Scoop.it
From irritations to ordeals, the novelist selects the best books about – and by – those who oppose their seas of trouble When I wrote my novel Malarky I was determined to create a portrait of a woman who wouldn't be sunk by what life served her and...

Via Alexandra Lopes
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