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Rescooped by Dru Galer from How to find and tell your story
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Dungeons, Dragons and Storytellers | National Storytelling Network ...

Dungeons, Dragons and Storytellers | National Storytelling Network ... | Literature Reviews | Scoop.it

Many people see role-playing games (RPGs) as obscure imaginary worlds, heavy rulebooks, and nerdy teenagers rolling multi-sided dice in their mother’s basement. However, role-playing in its oldest form, off the computer and with a group of friends, is nothing more than pure interactive storytelling.

 

Here is a short summary of how RPGs work. The group selects a Game Master (GM), also known as the Storyteller. Everyone else in the group is a Player, responsible for one character of his or her own creation, an alter-ego in the world of the game. The GM is responsible for keeping the story going forward; the Players play characters within the story. Their decisions determine how the story progresses.

 

RPGs are popular with audiences that many storytelling events have been lacking lately: young adults. Many times gamers pretend to be bards or storytellers for years without knowing such a thing exists in our world as well – as a profession, none the less! On the other hand, storytellers might not be aware of these new imaginary worlds that capture the attention of so many young people.

 

RPGs are a great way of exploring the world of legends, mythology, or folklore. They actively engage all participants. They are not only fun in the moment, but also create stories that players keep telling to each other often years after the game itself ended.


Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
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Rescooped by Dru Galer from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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What D&D can tell us about Transmedia

What D&D can tell us about Transmedia | Literature Reviews | Scoop.it

I’ve played Dungeons & Dragons for 14 years. And I’ve realized lately that this has, in many ways, done a lot to prepare me for writing for transmedia. There’s so much crossover between the best practices in D&D and in transmedia writing.

 

[It's not often you see an RPG used to discuss Transmedia Storytelling - this is well worth reading.]


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Rescooped by Dru Galer from Eclectic Technology
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Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning

Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning | Literature Reviews | Scoop.it

What happens when you tell your students to "pay attention!" More than you may think. This post explores what goes on in the brain and ways the brain pays attention. Research is shared as well as what you can do in your classroom immediately as well what you can do in the long term.
Short term solutions include "using prediction; using the brief pause and chunk technique; priming the learning with small hints, appetizers and teasers" and more.

You may also choose to view a video of a session "Teaching with the Brain in Mind" at http://www.scilearn.com/company/webinars/ (you will need to scroll down the page to find the link).


Via Beth Dichter
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Debra Evans's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:08 PM

Useful

Ruth Virginia Barton's curator insight, February 13, 2015 10:37 AM

"Instead of saying to students, “Pay attention!” what you really want to say is, “Suppress interesting things!” Why? Students already DO pay attention."  The point being, prolonged attention paying is a learned skill, practiced.  Intersperse teaching with stand-up breaks, quick physical activity.  Create "hooks' for attention - previews - and offer rewards - like homework free pass this month - for students who get it right; helps them be invested in topic

Rescooped by Dru Galer from Pervasive Entertainment Times
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Role-playing games: Games such as Dungeons and Dragons could help to solve some of the greatest technological challenges of our time

Role-playing games: Games such as Dungeons and Dragons could help to solve some of the greatest technological challenges of our time | Literature Reviews | Scoop.it
Games such as Dungeons and Dragons could help to solve some of the greatest technological challenges of our time

Via Gary Hayes
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Gary Hayes's curator insight, July 15, 2014 12:55 AM

Quote "What role-playing games do so beautifully is to provide a structure for non-writers, people who might say they're not very imaginative, to create characters. Those dice rolls, those bare-bones statistics – like the two dots and a line that suggest a face – start to encourage anyone to imagine a character. If this woman has come out through some random number generation to be physically agile, not very attractive, but skilled at thievery, how did she end up working in this library?If this man's got a lot of money, is quite bright, but is only averagely strong and catastrophically clumsy, what's he doing on an Arctic expedition? So much of storytelling is in the gaps, in allowing the imagination to work.

Chris Carter's curator insight, July 16, 2014 10:20 PM

Make me an elven ranger!

Rescooped by Dru Galer from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
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Everything I need to know about management I learned from playing Dungeons and Dragons

Everything I need to know about management I learned from playing Dungeons and Dragons | Literature Reviews | Scoop.it

It’s an open question whether the numerical system that drives Dungeons and Dragons is a fair (if simplified) simulation of the world or whether it has so shaped generations of teens that they now see the world in terms of D&D stats. Either way, here’s everything I learned about how to manage a team—and I have been responsible for many—by playing Dungeons and Dragons.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Rescooped by Dru Galer from 21st Century Teaching and Learning Resources
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10 Things Every Teacher Should Know How To Do With Google Docs | Edudemic

10 Things Every Teacher Should Know How To Do With Google Docs | Edudemic | Literature Reviews | Scoop.it

Google Docs is a powerful word processing tool that many schools have adopted. As it’s similar to Microsoft Word and other word processing tools, most of its features are intuitive to use. However, in addition to completing many of the functions of a traditional word processor, Google Docs provides even more capabilities that can be invaluable to educators. Here are ten tricks that can make your life easier with Google Docs:


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, July 18, 2014 8:36 PM

I have step by step increase the usage and teaching about Google Docs, Slides, Hangouts and Drive at school. It becomes easier if changes take place a step at a time in your teaching and learning environments.

Mark Fuson's curator insight, July 19, 2014 10:03 AM

I must admit, I've got to get better at some of these. One of the biggest issues with learning something is practice and practice takes time and the willingness to fail. Unfortunately, teachers often are so rushed by their schedules that they can't afford to struggle with something in order to learn it because they have 165 students, 3 different preps, papers to grade, a family life, and curriculum to create. Unless we change these factors, how can a teacher learn new skills in the classroom and why would they try to if experiencing a little failure could negatively impact evaluation?

Kim Lindskog's curator insight, July 25, 2014 5:07 PM

As we think about what it is that we want to help teachers with in relation to Google apps...this might help with the conversation.