Literature & Psychology
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Literature & Psychology
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More SC authors on the impact of Pat Conroy - The State

More SC authors on the impact of Pat Conroy - The State | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The State
More SC authors on the impact of Pat Conroy

 

More S.C. authors and literary figures talk about the influence of Pat Conroy, whose book, “My Reading Life,” is the selection for 2014 One Book, One Columbia.

 

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Laura Lippman: By the Book - New York Times

Laura Lippman: By the Book - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Laura Lippman: By the Book
New York Times

 

The author, most recently, of “After I’m Gone” likes books steeped in the quotidian. “You can learn how to run a chicken-and-waffle restaurant by reading ‘Mildred Pierce.’ ”

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Two titles that breathe new life into feminism - Irish Times

Two titles that breathe new life into feminism - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Two titles that breathe new life into feminism

Irish Times

 

If you had told me 10 years ago that one day British publishers would be publishing so many feminist books that I’d have to cram two of them into one review, I’d have been very pleased, but also very surprised. It wasn’t that feminists of all ages didn’t exist back then, it was more that the mainstream media, on this side of the Atlantic at least, seemed determined to ignore their existence. But the last few years have seen the welcome return of feminism to the mainstream, and these two books are among the latest results.


Virago’s Fifty Shades of Feminism is a collection of short pieces by a wide variety of women, all talking about what feminism means to them.

. . .

Guardian journalist Hadley Freeman’s Be Awesome is also optimistic and encouraging, though in a very different way.

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Mark McGuire - The Quietus

Mark McGuire - The Quietus | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mark McGuire
The Quietus

 

It seems McGuire is somewhat partial to arcane literature. 'In Search of the Miraculous', the third track on Along The Way - McGuire's debut release on American indie label Dead Oceans – is named after a book by Russian author P.D. Ouspensky. McGuire recently said of the song in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine "The main mantra of the song is, 'All that we know is only learned,' implying that all knowledge created and discovered by man is continuously open to re-evaluation and can always grow and change, which basically leaves reality open to all possibilities."

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The Walking Dead's Scariest Element Isn't Zombies, It's Memories - Wired

The Walking Dead's Scariest Element Isn't Zombies, It's Memories - Wired | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Walking Dead's Scariest Element Isn't Zombies, It's Memories
Wired


We love apocalyptic fiction for the same reason we love horror movies: the pleasure of looking into the dark mirror of the worst-case scenario, and emerging unscathed.

 

. . .

When it’s the one thing you can’t bear to think about, the memory of a better and more painless world becomes the car accident you can’t look away from, the dream that makes waking up into your horrible, shitty life feel all the more unendurable. There’s a reason that most horror movies start out in relatively peaceful, even idyllic setting: it gives us something to juxtapose the horror against, a “before” picture that makes the “after” seem all the more terrible.

 

The scariest thing for a survivor to see in the rearview mirror right now isn’t a zombie—it’s the past. And if The Walking Dead wants to stay truly dangerous, that’s exactly where it needs to look.

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The art of the guilty pleasure - Los Angeles Times

The art of the guilty pleasure - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The art of the guilty pleasure

Los Angeles Times

 

the subject is on my mind because of Adam Sternbergh’s essay this past weekend in the New York Times Magazine, “All of the Pleasure. None of the Guilt,” which also takes a stand against feeling bad about what we like.


“A friend of mine,” Sternbergh begins, “made a resolution once: No more guilty pleasures. I assumed at first that he meant he would no longer indulge in, you know, the usual cultural indulgences: those movies, books, TV shows, albums, et cetera, that are unabashedly enjoyable (like Miley Cyrus’s ‘Wrecking Ball’) but that also confer a patina of guilt to the self-conscious cultural consumer even as he’s enjoying them (like Miley Cyrus’s ‘Wrecking Ball’).


“But I was wrong. … What he meant was simpler and, I have since realized, more radical and ultimately more inspiring. He’d still enjoy all those cultural indulgences, he said. He would just no longer classify them as indulgences.”

 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

For those of us who sometimes us a book cover to hide what we're reading. . .

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Top Ten Tuesday: The Most Frustrating Characters in Literature ...

Top Ten Tuesday: The Most Frustrating Characters in Literature ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

 Thanks to the fabulous ladies of The Broke and The Bookish, today we’re discussing the most frustrating characters in literature! I like to think of them as the characters I’d most like to slap and/or punch, because I’m mentally violent.

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written in the blood - The Australian

written in the blood - The Australian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
written in the blood
The Australian

 

IT seems a bit rich, given he's described the present occupants of Buckingham Palace as "philistines" and likened Prince Charles's laugh to a "pig's snore", but Martin Amis appears genuinely aggrieved that his considerable contribution to the world of letters has not received royal recognition.

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Of writers, bookworms and the rest of us - Nigerian Tribune

Of writers, bookworms and the rest of us - Nigerian Tribune | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Of writers, bookworms and the rest of us
Nigerian Tribune

 

T HE literary world is another world entirely. It is different from the general world, our world. Our interests are not literary people’s interests. So are theirs not ours. They travel into their own world of meditation, deep thinking and analysis of all that exists. They belong to either of two poles: those of science and those of literature. They are both researchers who unravel what we fail to unearth. They put on their thinking caps and see for their readers and the world. They critique the society, x-raying the realities in their own world. Our perception may be their reality or vice versa. They see where others are blind. They wake up when others are sleeping, snoring away. They walk where others are wobbling. They fly where the rest of us crawl. So, they are far away to find out for us.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Another look at the science vs. humanities dichotomy

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Author Jonathan Lethem: Feminism seems so self-evident - Metro

Author Jonathan Lethem: Feminism seems so self-evident - Metro | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Metro
Author Jonathan Lethem: Feminism seems so self-evident

A wiry bundle of passionate and lucid self-analysis, the guy can talk. And talk. I'm waiting at his ...

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The Psychology of Storytelling and Empathy, Animated — PsyBlog

The Psychology of Storytelling and Empathy, Animated — PsyBlog | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
I want to tell you a story about two neurochemicals… ((Interesting Reading) The Psychology of Storytelling and Empathy, Animated - http://t.co/3YVlY4wgdW via @psyblog)...

 

Stories without key elements–including a climax and denouement–do not engage the brain in the same way. Indeed people ignore them.

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Philip Roth insists 'I have no desire to write fiction' - The Guardian

Philip Roth insists 'I have no desire to write fiction' - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian

Philip Roth insists 'I have no desire to write fiction'

 

A happily retired Philip Roth is spending his days swimming, watching baseball and nature-spotting, revelling in the fact that "there's more to life than writing and publishing fiction", according to a new interview.


Reiterating his bleak view about the future of literature – that "two decades on the size of the audience for the literary novel will be about the size of the group who read Latin poetry" – the 80-year-old Roth told Stanford scholar Cynthia Haven that his disengagement from the world of writing is still very much in evidence. Asked by Haven if he really believes his talent – which has won him the Man Booker International prize and made him a perennial contender for the Nobel – will "let [him] quit" writing, Roth responded: "You better believe me, because I haven't written a word of fiction since 2009."

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Revolutionary Cross-Dresser - Daily Beast

Revolutionary Cross-Dresser - Daily Beast | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Revolutionary Cross-Dresser
Daily Beast

 

Alex Myers’s debut novel, Revolutionary, reimagines the true story of Deborah Samson, a little remembered Revolutionary War soldier who disguised herself as a man to fight the British. Samson has fascinated Myers, 35, since childhood, not only because Samson is a distant relative, but also because Myers is a female-to-male transgender person. In the edited interview below, Myers discusses how his sexual identity informed the novel, the limits historical fact placed on him, and his own gender transformation.

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science fiction and philosophy » 3:AM Magazine

science fiction and philosophy » 3:AM Magazine | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Susan Schneider is the Sarah Connor of philosophy as she ponders the role of science fiction and thought experiments to help understand uploading, time travel, superintelligence, the singularity, a new approach to the computational theory of mind, consciousness, Jerry Fodor and physicalism.

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Post-40 Bloomers: You've Come a Long Way, Lady James - The Millions

Post-40 Bloomers: You've Come a Long Way, Lady James - The Millions | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Millions

Post-40 Bloomers: You've Come a Long Way, Lady James

 

her books abound with highly educated, often-influential characters who spout references to classic British literature and debate fine points of moral theology; and her most enduring creation, the fictional detective Adam Dalgliesh, is both a commander at New Scotland Yard and a famous poet.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An appreciation of British mystery novelist P.D. James

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CGS Library's curator insight, July 28, 2014 10:11 PM

Her sleuth Adam Dalgliesh is quick to solve mysteries with a discreet personality

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Peter James: Reading is most important thing for writers - gulfnews.com

Peter James: Reading is most important thing for writers
gulfnews.com

 

Do you think books can change or influence societies?


Yes, absolutely, books have been so often throughout our history a force for change. I have direct experience in my own small way, in my Roy Grace novels. My character, Roy Grace, has a hatred of the big hospital in Brighton, the Royal Sussex County Hospital. It has been a disgraceful place for many years. In several of my novels he has been really rude about it. Two years ago, I got a phone call from the director asking if he could come to meet me, and tell me of the changes they were planning, and if I would consider being more positive about it!

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From MIT, An Interactive Book That Makes You Feel Characters' Pain - Co.Design

From MIT, An Interactive Book That Makes You Feel Characters' Pain
Co.Design

 

Have you ever felt your pulse quicken when you read a book, or your skin go clammy during a horror story? A new student project out of MIT wants to deepen those sensations. They have created a wearable book that uses inexpensive technology and neuroscientific hacking to create a sort of cyberpunk Neverending Story that blurs the line between the bodies of a reader and protagonist.

 

Called Sensory Fiction, the project was created by a team of four MIT students--Felix Heibeck, Alexis Hope, Julie Legault, and Sophia Brueckner--who took part in Science Fiction To Science Fabrication class, a multimedia course that uses sci-fi as both inspiration and caution for the technology of the future.

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You're Missing Out on Great Literature - Pacific Standard

You're Missing Out on Great Literature - Pacific Standard | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
You're Missing Out on Great Literature
Pacific Standard


For a nation that takes pride in its immigrant history and its multicultural sensibility, the hostility to translated literature is downright bizarre—and not at all serving American readers.

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Ten Famed Literary Figures Based on Real-Life People - Smithsonian

Ten Famed Literary Figures Based on Real-Life People - Smithsonian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Writers are often told to write what they know, so it should come as no surprise that many of the most famous characters in literary history are based on real people. Whether drawing inspiration from their spouses, friends and ...
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Riot Round-Up: The Best Books We Read in January | BOOK ...

Riot Round-Up: The Best Books We Read in January | BOOK ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Quite an eclectic collection by the editors at BookRiot.

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A Good Story Is Disturbing - Huffington Post

A Good Story Is Disturbing
Huffington Post

 

As a psychiatrist and novelist, I'm aware that all good stories are disturbing. No matter how beautifully written or "literary," a novel resonates deeply because the storyline tugs powerfully at us. It upsets, confounds and presents chaos, conflict, imbalance and upheaval -- either within its character's mind or circumstances.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

I would have liked to see a deeper development of this concept that some kind of conflict is at the root of every good story.

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Why Our Brains Make Us Click on Lists : The New Yorker

Why Our Brains Make Us Click on Lists : The New Yorker | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

“6 TITANIC SURVIVORS WHO SHOULD HAVE DIED.” “THESE 9 NAZI ATROCITIES WILL MAKE YOU LOSE FAITH IN HUMANITY.” “5 INSANE PLANS FOR FEEDING WEST BERLIN YOU WON’T BELIEVE ARE REAL.” These are just some of the lists that the comic strip “XKCD” recently joked would result from retrofitting the twentieth century’s most newsworthy events with modern, Internet-style headlines. Despite the growing derision of listicles exemplified by the comic, numbered lists—a venerable media format—have become one of the most ubiquitous ways to package content on the Web. Why do we find them so appealing?

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An interesting juxtaposition to the animated piece on storytelling, below.

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William S. Burroughs at 100: Exploding Five Major Myths - Huffington Post

William S. Burroughs at 100: Exploding Five Major Myths
Huffington Post

 

William S. Burroughs, literary scourge of the banal and the boring, best known as the author of the still outrageous Naked Lunch (1959), would have turned 100 on February 5.

. . .

 

And those marking the Burroughs century will have a thousand different version of Burroughs to choose from, and the celebrations will commemorate and mythologize, perhaps in equal parts. Burroughs' myth -- writ large -- remains a powerful mirror for everyone from ex-Hippies to ad executives to cut-and-paste culture content creators (count me in the latter group).

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Change of scenes: The endings to books and films we never got to see - Mirror.co.uk

Change of scenes: The endings to books and films we never got to see - Mirror.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mirror.co.uk
Change of scenes: The endings to books and films we never got to see

 

Harry Potter creator JK Rowling has admitted the romance between two of her famous characters – Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley – was a mistake.

 

She says that Harry and Hermione should have got together instead.

But the author’s books and the movies that followed aren’t the only works of literature and cinema that have faced alternative endings.

 

From sci-fi flicks to classic novels, some of our most cherished, ­hilarious and terrifying tales could have turned out so differently…

 

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How Does the Classic Marriage Plot Stand Up in 2014? - New York Times

How Does the Classic Marriage Plot Stand Up in 2014? - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
How Does the Classic Marriage Plot Stand Up in 2014?
New York Times

 

This week, Francine Prose and Dana Stevens discuss whether the classic marriage plot — desire, courtship, happily ever after — stand up in 2014?

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