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On the Tolkien trail: Middle-earth? You needn't fly down under to find it - Telegraph.co.uk

On the Tolkien trail: Middle-earth? You needn't fly down under to find it - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk On the Tolkien trail: Middle-earth? You needn't fly down under to find it

 

Why should New Zealand get all the benefit? Tourists have been flocking there since it was chosen as the location for the Lord of the Rings films. They will no doubt be back in force with the release of The Hobbit, greeted by an enormous statue of Gollum at Wellington airport. Is it too pedantic to point out that Tolkien himself never set foot in the country? Or that, if people really want to find the Shire in Middle-earth, the setting for The Hobbit, they would be better off looking in the suburbs of Birmingham or a pub in Oxford?

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Why TV Apocalypses Are Really Wish-Fulfillment Fables

Why TV Apocalypses Are Really Wish-Fulfillment Fables | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The apocalypse mostly serves as a way to turn up the contrast on a hero's solitary battle to adapt and sally forth. Stripping away the complications and distractions of the modern world, what is our protagonist left with? The same melancholy and longing he or she always had, of course, but with far more of an excuse to feel these heavy emotions at every turn. Instead of injecting desperation, romance, solitude, and morbidity into a banal tale, these qualities are encoded in the apocalyptic novel's DNA, minimizing the trivial clutter and heightening the stakes. Values and ideas about morality are stripped down to their essential nature: Kill or be killed? Conform and tolerate oppression or escape and risk death?

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New search engine 'Small Demons' connects literary dots - CTV News

New search engine 'Small Demons' connects literary dots - CTV News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
CTV News New search engine 'Small Demons' connects literary dots

 

Small Demons, http://www.smalldemons.com, an encyclopedia and "Storyverse" that catalogues names, places, songs, products and other categories for thousands of books.

 

Officially launched in August, Small Demons is the book world's latest mind game and guilty pleasure and a proving ground that everything really is connected. You can find out how many books mention the Beatles or the Pacific Ocean or Rice Krispies. You can find answers to questions you never meant to ask, like whether writers favor Marlboros or Camels (Camels have the edge, 85-65), or which brands of cold medicine are cited in EL James' "Fifty Shades of Grey" (NyQuil, Advil, Tylenol).

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Why I like to read - Stuff.co.nz (blog)

Why I like to read - Stuff.co.nz (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Stuff.co.nz (blog) Why I like to read Stuff.co.nz (blog) I am most curious about people, and so the stories I enjoy are often character-driven. It's an old-fashioned concept though, that you need to divide books into plot- or character-driven stories.
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The Tainted Bird - Tablet Magazine

The Tainted Bird Tablet Magazine Accusations arose, most potently in a 1982 Village Voice exposé by Geoffrey Stokes and Eliot Fremont-Smith, that Kosinski plagiarized his novels, fabricated the verity of their autobiographical nature ...

 

Even after his death, Kosinski has failed to evade the ineluctable stream of detractors who believe him to be nothing more than a bloated, odious fraud. But Sloan, while at times an insufferably redundant and partial biographer, says it best when he concludes that Kosinski “lived in an aged of incongruities.” Kosinski himself is a living embodiment of said contradictions, and Oral Pleasure: Kosinski as Storyteller—a collection of mostly unpublished interviews and speeches compiled in part by Kosinski’s late second wife, Kiki—is a testament to his convoluted self. It both reinforces the myths of his life (since these are, after all, his words alone) and quiets them amid the clamor of his critics. While at times repetitive and confusing, occasionally cutting speeches into chunks running parts of the same speech in different sections to fit neatly within the book’s 16 thematic categories, it is nevertheless a most welcome body of texts that elucidates a rather mysterious persona.

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Lens on Literature: Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment ...

Lens on Literature: Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The intent is to provoke readers' thinking about the psychological perspectives within the subject piece and in other writings, without conforming the blog post to the style of literary criticism or explication.

 

From the perspective of constructive-developmental psychology, Dostoyevsky’s classic novel might also merit the title Society Distinguishing Expertism from Opportunism. (Wikipedia provides a plot summary and character sketches here.)

 

The Diplomat meaning-making system of mid-19th-Century Russia is the central axis around which the psychology within Dostoyevsky’s characters turns: particular societal expectations, as well as the general principle of deriving one’s identity from social status and interpersonal relations, are the foreground of this novel, with each character locatable somewhere on the Opportunist-Diplomat-Expert spectrum. The novel explores the conflicts among these differently-developed characters as they struggle to understand the action logics of each other and to reconcile emotions of scorn, love, hate, and magnanimity.

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Visitors leave notes and other mementos at the grave of Henry David Thoreau in ... - Sacramento Bee

Visitors leave notes and other mementos at the grave of Henry David Thoreau in ... - Sacramento Bee | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Visitors leave notes and other mementos at the grave of Henry David Thoreau in ...Sacramento Bee Concord [Massachusetts] was clearly something of a literary hot spot back in the day.

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Cheatin' hearts: On our enduring love of adultery in fiction - Globe and Mail

Cheatin' hearts: On our enduring love of adultery in fiction - Globe and Mail | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Globe and Mail Cheatin' hearts: On our enduring love of adultery in fiction Globe and MailFlaubert takes the prize, in my view, because he invented a brand-new literary style to express the infidelity's inherent psychological conflict.

 

If there is one thing we should learn from its omnipresence in literature, it’s that cheating is as common as muck. We can fear it (and what happily monogamous person doesn’t?), but we might as well accept it – or at the very least try to understand how it works. Thankfully, we can do this by reading great works of fiction, which might save us the trouble of having to throw ourselves under a train when, invariably, it all goes wrong.

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Finding inspiration for fiction in local supermarket? - Chestnut Hill Local (blog)

Finding inspiration for fiction in local supermarket? - Chestnut Hill Local (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Chestnut Hill Local (blog) Finding inspiration for fiction in local supermarket?

 

I don’t know about you, but I often stand on the blurry line between fact and fiction, wondering if I can believe my own eyes and ears. Amazing things occur, things that would stretch credulity on the printed page. My daughter Rose’s casual coffee-shop conversation with a stranger in New York City led to the realization that the other person’s cousin lives on the same block as we do in Pennsylvania. 30 years after my sister Maureen’s death, I received an email from someone I didn’t remember, but who had dated Mo back in the 1970s. He’d found and read my book while waiting in his doctor’s office in New Jersey, and tracked me down. Hard to believe, but it really happened.

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On Great Novels with Bad Endings

On Great Novels with Bad Endings | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Many of the world’s best novels have bad endings. I don’t mean that they end sadly, or on a back-to-work, all-is-forgiven note, but that the ending is actually inartistic—a betrayal of what came before.
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The Education of Virginia Woolf - The Atlantic

The Education of Virginia Woolf - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Atlantic The Education of Virginia Woolf

 

Born into the highest stratum of the English intellectual aristocracy, Virginia Woolf—whose set included some of the kingdom’s most illustrious families, many of its finest writers and painters, its greatest poet, its most brilliant economist—could be an appalling snob. But as this assemblage displays, she also lived by and championed a generously democratic vision of literature and of the reading life—“a pursuit,” she somewhat wistfully acknowledged, “which devours a great deal of time, and is yet apt to leave behind it nothing very substantial.”

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Human psychology was her forte - The Hindu

Human psychology was her forte - The Hindu | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Hindu Human psychology was her forte

 

Can a single novel become the calling card of a writer, who churned out hundreds of short stories, wrote several novels and edited a magazine apart from assisting her film-writer-husband? Kamala Sadagopan donned all these hats with deceptive ease, surmounting hurdles and challenges.

 

Kamala’s ‘Kadhavu,’ a social novel serialised in Kalaimagal dealt with family relationships that a new bride inherits. Many spoke of changed hearts and salvaged marriages after reading the novel. Along with ‘Kadavu,’ her ‘Padigal’ and ‘Varisu’ were prescribed novels for university students, for the content of values and understanding of human psychology. Always taking up the cudgels for the underdog, her solutions were simple. Many student submitted theses on her novels.

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What is metaphysical fiction? | Tahlia Newland, author

What is metaphysical fiction? | Tahlia Newland, author | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The designation metaphysical fiction was first attributed to the poetry of certain 17th-century poets who combined intense feeling with ingenious thought and often used an intellectually challenging style, extended metaphors and elaborate imagery. Notable among them were Donne, Herbert, and Marvell.

 

Explanations of the metaphysical poets’ style stress the importance of ideas—intellectually challenging, ingenious thought—and I propose that this aspect is the defining characteristic of metaphysical fiction.

 

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Charles Dickens' London home to reopen to the public after £3.1 million revamp - The Independent

Charles Dickens' London home to reopen to the public after £3.1 million revamp - The Independent | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Charles Dickens' London home to reopen to the public after £3.1 million revamp

 

next week, Charles Dickens’ London home will reopen to the public as a museum complete with an array of the great man’s personal possessions, even including his original writing desk.

The house, on Doughty Street in central London’s Bloomsbury, has been stripped of as many modern features as possible in a £3.1m revamp which the curators hope will give visitors the impression that the author has just “stepped outside”.

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From 'The Walking Dead' to 'Contagion,' What Are Your Post-Apocalyptic ... - ThinkProgress

From 'The Walking Dead' to 'Contagion,' What Are Your Post-Apocalyptic ... - ThinkProgress | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
ThinkProgress From 'The Walking Dead' to 'Contagion,' What Are Your Post-Apocalyptic

 

I think my reaction to post-apocalypse fiction, and really, all sorts of futuristic narratives, is to be more interested in how we got there than what we do when we’re there. I love the first two books in Kim Stanley Robinson’s Mars trilogy because they’re all about the choices the characters make to extend their lifespans, to terraform Mars, to embrace new religions, and ultimately, to declare independence from Earth, but I’m relatively bored by the third novel, which is about all the sex and drama a new generation has once the future’s finally arrived. Reading The Hunger Games, I always want to know how the Capitol seized enough power to bring the Districts to heel enough to set up the Games in the first place. I wonder about first contact and the Bugger Wars in Ender’s Game, though I think Orson Scott Card is smart enough to weave a lot of backstory about the way the world changed into his story about what it’s become now. I love Contagion so much because it’s the rare, beautifully optimistic movie about how we avert a post-apocalypse, rather than bowing down to the inevitability of disaster.

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Not Your Father's School: BEST CLASS EVER; EVER AGAIN?

Not Your Father's School: BEST CLASS EVER; EVER AGAIN? | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

What I witnessed was a seventh/eighth-grade humanities class at Oak Meadow Montessori School in Littleton, Massachusetts. The students were getting started reading Antigone, but teacher Karen Kelley is all about pushing the human, the personal side of student understanding, and so she was getting the students revved up to explore the moral questions raised by Sophocles by having asked them, as homework the night before, to take a favorite character in literature, film, or even television and decide where that character might fall on the scale of Laurence Kohlberg’s Stages of Moral Development. They’d already spent class time talking about Kohlberg’s work.

If I thought the approach was cool and likely to be fruitful (and I sure did), I was blown away by the kids’ responses. In a seminar that would be the envy of anyone working at a Harkness table or even plenty of graduate school literature professors, students took the discussion ball and ran with it: politely, smartly, each kid fully engaged and fully immersed in the learning. I heard kids talk about the moral development of SpongeBob SquarePants, Ferris Bueller (and Dean Rooney), and both sides of the Syrian conflict; one girl made the anguished observation that a character she deeply admires—Katniss from The Hunger Games—isn’t really very far along, and “it makes me really sad to have to admit this.” With only minor clarifications and gentle probing from their teacher, the students created a discussion that was lively, balanced, and intellectually and even affectively provocative. They kids listened to one another and pretty clearly worked to understand where their classmates were coming from, as we used to say. Unlike so many seminars I have seen (and occasionally taught), no one felt to need to prove himself or herself the winner. Everybody won.

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Life After a Ponzi Scheme: Victim Turns Million-Dollar Loss into Literature - DailyFinance

Life After a Ponzi Scheme: Victim Turns Million-Dollar Loss into Literature - DailyFinance | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Life After a Ponzi Scheme: Victim Turns Million-Dollar Loss into Literature DailyFinance

 

The money may be gone, but the memories of being a victim of a Ponzi scheme will not soon be forgotten. McCabe reached out to fellow victims and interviewed 200 of the 700 to find out how the scheme had affected their lives.

 

His research informs the pages of his novel Betrayed, which gives a personal perspective on the fallout from a financial tragedy.

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Death, be not unproductive: 21 inspired creative works made by the dying - A.V. Club

Death, be not unproductive: 21 inspired creative works made by the dying - A.V. Club | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

A.V. Club Death, be not unproductive: 21 inspired creative works made by the dying

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A portrait in gripping storytelling - Jamaica Gleaner

A portrait in gripping storytelling - Jamaica Gleaner | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Jamaica Gleaner A portrait in gripping storytelling Jamaica GleanerWriters, one after another, present a literary canvas of a Kingston that is hardly comely. 

 

Kingston Noir is an eclectic and gritty melange of tales that sears the imagination, living up to its boiler room genre. Writers, one after another, present a literary canvas of a Kingston that is hardly comely. Yet, it pulsates and magnetises the reader. Sure, it is edgy, predictably unsettling - be it from the sweltering heat that Ian Thompson bemoans in A Grave Understanding, or, from the hooliganism of Soft Paw and bwoy-dem who terrorise residents in Kei Miller's The White Gyal and the Camera. Not that Lil Croc and his gang in Christopher Farley's crime thriller, 54-46 (That's My Number), are not equally disturbing. Interestingly, it is in this tale that the reader is mesmerised by the island's argot. "Wa a gwaan?" says one character, quickly followed by the response: "Im two ears hard," ... "A good mek 'im tengle up ... dat deh a fi uno!").

 

Noir delivers crisp snapshots of Kingston neighbourhoods that are gnawing realities of an existence that is void of justice and equanimity. Perennial social problems seep through every page, and are deftly addressed with bewitching rhyme and cadence.

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A Warrior's Welcome In 'Billy Lynn' - KQED

A Warrior's Welcome In 'Billy Lynn' - KQED | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
KQED A Warrior's Welcome

 

[About Ben Fountain's novel "Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk"]

 

To read Billy Lynn is to engage in a pure, tactile state of sensory overload. You feel this story with your whole body — all the adrenaline, tension and nausea. The novel is a veritable decoupage of physical sensation — from the sodium glare of stadium lights, to the acid sting of bitterness in the throat; from the woozy disequilibrium of a Jack Daniels hangover, to the galloping heartbeat of unfettered carnality. Fountain achieves that rare level of evocation that makes readers feel as though they lived it.

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The imaginative flip-flop « Snarkmarket

RT @tcarmody: On Tolstoy, Erich Auerbach, and this funny thing we call literary history.

 

Can you think your way through time and recognize yourself on the other side, not through a false sense of universal humanity but through the textures of lived experience? Can you encounter the dark miracle we have chosen to christen “literature”?

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MU grad publishes seventh mystery novel - Columbia Daily Tribune (blog)

Columbia Daily Tribune (blog) MU grad publishes seventh mystery novel: In your blog you mention that your background in psychology helps you create plot twists that engage your readers.

 

Tribune: You studied psychology at the University of Missouri, but during that time you were actively writing. What prompted your decision to work toward a psychology degree rather than, say, creative writing?

 

Claridge: I actually came to Mizzou on a theater scholarship. Theater was my first creative love and is still near and dear to my heart. Now, I live vicariously through my daughter, who performs in several shows each year. In college, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to be when I grew up. All I knew was that I “fit” somewhere in a creative field. By the same token, I was also intrigued by the mind … what makes people tick … what drives one person toward stability and another off the deep end? Thus, I found psychology fascinating and, looking back, I am glad I did because it helps me create the criminal minds in my books.

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'Homeland's' Marin Ireland Joins Fox's 'The Following' (Exclusive) - Hollywood Reporter

'Homeland's' Marin Ireland Joins Fox's 'The Following' (Exclusive) - Hollywood Reporter | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Ace Showbiz 'Homeland's' Marin Ireland Joins Fox's 'The Following'

 

The psychological thriller centers on an Edgar Allan Poe scholar (James Purefoy)-turned-serial killer and stars Kevin Bacon as a damaged FBI agent on the case to recapture the killer and his army of copycats.

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Silver Linings Playbook: It's the little things in life … - World Socialist Web Site

Silver Linings Playbook: It's the little things in life … - World Socialist Web Site | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
World Socialist Web Site Silver Linings Playbook: It's the little things in life …

 

Russell’s movie refers to recognizable people, locales and problems, it is not a concocted “high-tech, global action” film or some such. However, it lacks weight and staying power in the end because it only goes part way in the direction of real life. There is no strong feeling for or artistic impression offered of the current American reality, with its stressed-out population, half of whom live in poverty or near-poverty. Silver Linings Playbook lacks that indelible smack of the here and now, which any important work has to have.

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Sinister Settings in Sweden - - My Destination

Sinister Settings in Sweden - - My Destination | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

And this is where Camilla buried the body,” our guide announces, pointing to the mound of grass and rocky soil over which I had just wandered. I take a hasty step backwards. “At least, that’s what I gather from the book” she says matter-of-factly. I exhale.

 

You could compare the death rate in the sleepy fishing town of Fjällbacka to that of the eponymous village of Midsomer Murders. All purely fictional of course, there is no corner of Camilla Läckberg’s childhood home which hasn’t made an appearance in her world famous – and incredibly chilling – crime novels; I was standing at the location of one particularly grisly plotline.

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