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Thoughts on Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies

Thoughts on Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The relationship between a fictional world and the actual is poorly understood psychological phenomenon. As readers, we seem to grant the author wide license to make up what happens at the fictional world. But not total freedom. We still import many beliefs about our world and apply them to the fictional world.

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This Month's Cato Unbound: Liberty, Commerce, and Literature ...

This Month's Cato Unbound: Liberty, Commerce, and Literature ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

This month’s Cato Unbound is on the theme of Liberty, Commerce, and Literature. We all know that the western canon is often extraordinarily critical of the free market, sometimes without its authors appearing to understand very much about economics at all. But why should this be? Literature as we know it owes much to commercial society. Before the early modern era, one could almost never make a living as a writer. People read many fewer books — if they could read at all — and serious literature frequently belonged to the upper classes alone. It would be odd if literature were so unaware of the institutions that made it so popular in today’s commercial, market-driven world.

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Apocalyptic Literature: What I want to see. | In Case of Survival

Apocalyptic Literature: What I want to see. | In Case of Survival | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Most of the apocalyptic literature I've read was by men. The problem was, a great many of their female characters were cliches – irritating, insulting cliches at that. Remember that women are human beings rather than a ...
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OnFiction: Wired For Story

OnFiction: Wired For Story | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
OnFiction is a magazine with the aim of developing the psychology of fiction. Using theoretical and empirical perspectives, we endeavour to understand how fiction is created, and how readers and audience members engage ...
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Binet Combines Narrative and Nonfiction in Captivating Debut

Binet Combines Narrative and Nonfiction in Captivating Debut | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

What makes Binet’s work different from your average historical-fiction novel is the way in which he structures his writing: by alternating between his life and the lives of Heydrich, Gabcik, Kubis, and those of various supporting characters, the author manages to place himself directly in the story, weaving his personal struggles, triumphs, and fascinations into the fabric of history and the remarkably true storyline.

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4th Grade For Sure: Postmodern Literature for Children

4th Grade For Sure: Postmodern Literature for Children | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Stories are told from multiple points of view and readers must interpret how characters and narrators are related to each other. There are seven defining characteristics of postmodern literature. Let's take a look at them: ...

 

[I had no idea that postmodernism was prevalent in children's books, even picture books! ---MDB]

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Haunting Summer Books: 9 Books With Deceased Protagonists Kat Rosenfield - Huffington Post

Haunting Summer Books: 9 Books With Deceased Protagonists Kat Rosenfield - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Haunting Summer Books: 9 Books With Deceased Protagonists Kat Rosenfield Huffington Post

From ghostly protagonists to long-dead foils, literature is full of characters whose lives are over before the story even begins - and whom, though we never...

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Speaking About Africa - the Danger of a Single Story - AllAfrica.com

Speaking About Africa - the Danger of a Single Story - AllAfrica.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Speaking About Africa - the Danger of a Single Story AllAfrica.com

In 2009, Adichie put a name to these tensions: The Danger of a Single Story. Speaking at an international conference, she recounted her childhood years absorbed in British novels. Her own first literary efforts therefore featured white-skinned characters, with sparkling blue eyes, frolicking through the snow and enjoying apples. It wasn’t until she discovered Achebe – whose novel Things Fall Apart she channels in the first sentence of her Purple Hibiscus – that Adichie realised people like her, and settings like Nigeria, could be explored in the graceful rhythms of fiction. When she studied in the United States, she found a less complete global narrative in her roommate who couldn’t believe she could speak English and was dismayed to learn her favourite music had little to do with bare-chested drum circles. Adichie didn’t fault her new friend, but understood that her view of Africa had been shaped by “a single story of catastrophe”.

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Ancient vs Modern Reading | Psychology Today

Ancient vs Modern Reading | Psychology Today | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
How Has Reading Changed? By Elisabeth Pearson Waugaman, Ph.D....

For centuries, writers have used parables, symbols, and allegories to present spiritual knowledge in a form that invites thought and evolves as our understanding does. According to the Bahais, God will send new prophets as we are able to understand their messages—as we evolve in our understanding. Similarly, Christianity and Islam believe their prophets will return, perhaps when mankind incarnates their teaching of peace and love. Enlightenment is multifaceted. As we seek enlightenment, we should realize that the divine manifests to the diversity of mankind in diverse ways, that each religion has much to teach the other, that it is only through assimilation that we can come to a greater understanding of one another and the divine.

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The Russian soul: understanding Russian literature « The Bright Old ...

The Russian soul: understanding Russian literature « The Bright Old ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

This is the great thing about Russian literature: there’s a theme, there’s the twist of events and a great study of society and historical approaches just as in other countries, but in comparison to other literatures, the Russian one is not just a train journey where you watch outside the window. It is one where you see your own reflection in it, where you try to see pieces of you in there, a projection, and it makes you ask yourself questions, it makes you define your personality in the end. It makes you come face to face with the unknown and, despite knowing it’s just a novel, you cannot escape the fundamental questions arising from it. Closing the book won’t help.

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The Pulp Magazines Project: Preserving Popular Fiction - The Golden Gazette News

The Pulp Magazines Project: Preserving Popular Fiction - The Golden Gazette News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Golden Gazette News The Pulp Magazines Project: Preserving Popular Fiction The Pulp Magazines Project is a massive undertaking to preserve a vital aspect of American history—the pulp fiction magazines, magazines that launched the careers of legendary names in literary history including Edgar Rice Burroughs, Dashiell Hammett, L. Ron Hubbard and Louis L’Amour, among others.
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Can E-Readers Ease Reading for Dyslexics? - Stephen's Lighthouse

Can E-Readers Ease Reading for Dyslexics? - Stephen's Lighthouse | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In a study led by psychologist Beth O'Brien of Tufts University and published in the Journal of Research on Reading in 2005, the authors presented passages printed in progressively bigger letters to groups of dyslexic and ...
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Featured Lesson: Africa – Psychology and Literature: Analyzing

Featured Lesson: Africa – Psychology and Literature: Analyzing | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Featured Lesson: Africa – Psychology and Literature: Analyzing “Zenzele: A Letter for My Daughter” by J. Nozipo Maraire. By Sarah Bousquet

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Making Handmade Books: Egos & Alter Egos in Writing and the Arts

Making Handmade Books: Egos & Alter Egos in Writing and the Arts | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

When an artist, knowingly or not, creates an alter ego, what is gained? An artist may need to keep two selves separate. The art may need a different context in order to communicate. The artist may need distance from the work for personal or professional reasons. Does this distance veil the work and/or hide flaws, or illuminate it and provide clarity? We are used to fiction in literature, but fiction in art, perhaps because we don't have a name for it, is trickier to understand. Some of the art needs the fictional frame, it is an integrated part of the piece; if you removed the "creator," the piece would be confusing. In all cases, I would hope that the art would be emotionally and/or aesthetically strong enough to engage the viewer. Ideally, each object-part would be powerful on its own, yet when combined with its fictional creator, the total would be a new and meaningful whole.

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Books That Shock, Move and Change Their Readers « S.C.Skillman ...

Books That Shock, Move and Change Their Readers « S.C.Skillman ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

I have loved many books in my life, but the ones that stand out for me have three ingredients: archetypal themes, emotional charge and X factor. And they are the ones which can indeed change the way you see the world.

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Natasha A. Salnikova - Summer Splash Guest Post - Writing Murder

Natasha A. Salnikova - Summer Splash Guest Post - Writing Murder | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

My psychological thriller “The Savior” has a lot of violence. It has characters with psychological problems. The last scene in the novel was a little difficult for me to write. I thought about the feelings of the readers. I was uncomfortable myself, even looking at the scene from the outside. It was difficult for me to re-read it when I was editing. I don’t know what emotions readers will have during this scene, but I hope they won’t judge me by my characters actions. Trust me, sometimes they do things I don’t approve of, but what can I do? At some point in the book, they tell me what to write, not the opposite.

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Projecting Nabakov « Mind Hacks

Projecting Nabakov « Mind Hacks | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
As is now standard for literary criticism it includes lots of florid prose and a spurious reference to mirror neurons, but get past the flouncing and it's a brilliant look at perhaps the most psychologically engaged author of the 20th ...
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16 Fiction Book Characters' Myers-Briggs Personality Types - Huffington Post

16 Fiction Book Characters' Myers-Briggs Personality Types - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
16 Fiction Book Characters' Myers-Briggs Personality Types Huffington Post

Interestingly, many protagonists and authors are INFPs due to the type's creative, introspective nature, so don't take offense if you're matched up with a villain or a sidekick.

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Diving Into Pandemonium: Some Turbulent Postulations About Reading

Diving Into Pandemonium: Some Turbulent Postulations About Reading | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Each branch of knowledge has its own allure when discussing reading. Cognitive science, neuroscience, and psychology all endeavor to produce the most empirical analyses of what the brain actually does when we read.

Reading is a cognitive process that we can watch light up an fMRI monitor, but those mechanics, which we still barely understand, are only one part of what reading actually is. There are individual and collective psychological elements, there are aspects of feeling and motivation, and there are cultural conceits and social effects too. As Bloom and Green put it a few decades ago, “[a]s a social process, reading is used to establish, structure, and maintain social relationships between and among people. As a linguistic process, reading is used to communicate intentions and meanings, not only between an author and a reader, but also between people involved in a reading event.” Reading is not just a pandemonium in the mind; it is a pandemonium that emerges from many different angles of human action. We cannot grasp it as one thing, because it is always implicated in multiple layers of thought and practice. Thus, we have to not just create metaphors that make it easier to understand, we have to create fantasies about it that link to what we already know. The trick now is to look more carefully at those fantasies and see how they unfold when we perform particular sorts of reading activity and try to pay attention to the reading without letting our preconceptions or agendas overtake us.

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Crime Always Pays: Review: TORN by Casey Hill

Crime Always Pays: Review: TORN by Casey Hill | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In the guise of ostensibly escapist mystery fiction, Casey Hill asks a valid but rarely asked question: do readers have the stomach for a truly gritty reality, in which some crimes, no matter how terrible, simply go unpunished?
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Teach Me Tonight: These Things Called Love (1)

Teach Me Tonight: These Things Called Love (1) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

What I want to do, then, in some upcoming blog posts here, is to post about and / or link to some ideas about "love itself" that currently interest me, and ones that I've found useful over the (many) years I've been thinking about the topic. No doubt these will end up including posts about some of love's representations outside of popular fiction, since I'm not sure that love exists, really, except as mediated by cultural representations, a topic I'll return to.

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Taking Australian literature to the world stage - Sydney Morning Herald

Taking Australian literature to the world stage - Sydney Morning Herald | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Sydney Morning Herald Taking Australian literature to the world stage

Believing that the study of a nation's literature was the key to understanding its culture, he devoted the rest of his academic life to Australian literature. Perhaps a culmination of the thrust of his research was his publication in 2006 of Homing In: Essays on Australian Literature and Selfhood.

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Grief and Resilience After Loss of Mind, Body, and Homeland - Psychiatric Times

Grief and Resilience After Loss of Mind, Body, and Homeland Psychiatric Times Grief is the psychological, behavioral, social and physical reaction to a loss that is closely tied to a person's identity. Here, an exploration ...
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The Imposter shows the true story of a bold lie that's often stranger than fiction - stv.tv

The Imposter shows the true story of a bold lie that's often stranger than fiction - stv.tv | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
stv.tv The Imposter shows the true story of a bold lie that's often stranger than fiction stv.tv There is an undeniable coolness to the way it is told considering the emotive nature of the subject matter.
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Monday Guest Post: The book that I hate to love by Mason Engelander

Monday Guest Post: The book that I hate to love by Mason Engelander | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
I hate literary analysis and I hate literary criticism. In my eyes, never has a bigger waste of words existed. How about you just goddamn write something better if you don't like it? Or, for those who argue that it's important to ...
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