Literature & Psyc...
Follow
5.1K views | +2 today
Literature & Psychology
interdisciplinary explorations
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Allure of Romance | Psychology Today

The Allure of Romance | Psychology Today | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When something is as successful as romance novels, there's probably a solid reason that can be traced back to our nature as humans. ...

Not knowing much about romance novels, I wondered if there might be a risk of unrealistic expectations by their readers if real life partners can’t live up to romance novel ideals. People who have studied this though seem to find the opposite, that readers of romance novels are actually happier overall. One reason might be that their stories are examples of positive psychology. By the end of the story, everything reliably works out. Stories like this can be reassuring, and train our mind to have positive expectations. And when we have positive expectations about the world, we tend to be happier. We have a compelling attraction for stories, psychologists have found, so maybe it’s a good thing if we are drawn to stories with happy endings, and keep on optimistically working toward happiness in our own lives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Unsentimental Holidays, Part 1: James Joyce and "The Dead" - Huffington Post

Unsentimental Holidays, Part 1: James Joyce and "The Dead" - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Unsentimental Holidays, Part 1: James Joyce and "The Dead" Huffington Post

It's natural: we put pressure on each other to be merry, dress festively and carol with gusto.

The reality is we might want to cut off the lights, draw the curtains, and watch The Godfather on a loop until all the singing's done outside.

To help, I'm going to roll out a handful of suggested books, movies and albums to get you through the holidays without much sentiment -- while also not falling back on cynicism and despair. I hope these suggestions are clear-eyed clarifiers, letting you know it's okay to not be kissing under the mistletoe if you don't feel up to it.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A good suggestion for introverts, as well as anyone who gets overwhelmed by too much holiday togetherness.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Beth Fish Reads: Review: A Possible Life by Sebastian Faulks

Beth Fish Reads: Review: A Possible Life by Sebastian Faulks | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
For example, at least one character in each part suffers from a psychological crisis, such as post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, or mental breakdown. In addition, the protagonist of each story is on an upward journey, ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

How fiction can engage history students in the past

How fiction can engage history students in the past | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
History teachers know film is a great way to hook students in, but is the book better than the film?

 

"I've recently been experimenting with using fiction in the classroom. For history students, it's a great way to engage with the past, opening up avenues to lesser studied aspects of the subject such as social and cultural history."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Children's books portray the tough reality of hunger and poverty - Twin Cities Daily Planet (blog)

Children's books portray the tough reality of hunger and poverty - Twin Cities Daily Planet (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Twin Cities Daily Planet (blog) Children's books portray the tough reality of hunger and poverty

 

In recent times the world of children’s literature has expanded to embrace the plight of children closer to home. My amateur search for children’s books about poverty and hunger is grossly limited by my ignorance of the genre. A good children’s librarian, teacher or bookseller would be a far better resource. My thought has been to explore children’s stories about hunger in our midst. The goal has been to find books that tell a story that will some day have meaning for my grandson whose idea of severe hunger is missing a glass of milk at bedtime.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Rick Riordan: 'Myths are universal and are totally ingrained in our culture' - The Guardian

Rick Riordan: 'Myths are universal and are totally ingrained in our culture' - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian Rick Riordan: 'Myths are universal and are totally ingrained in our culture'

 

To a degree, the Greek and Roman mythological heroes are just the first superheroes. They appeal to children for much the same reason. These gods and heroes may have powers, but they get angry and they do the wrong thing. They are human too. Children relate to gods because they are really parental figures, who make mistakes and who seem very capricious.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Nadim Abbas explores the ambiguity of the image - South China Morning Post

Nadim Abbas explores the ambiguity of the image - South China Morning Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Nadim Abbas explores the ambiguity of the image South China Morning Post

 

In his work, Abbas explores the nature of the image and reality - namely, the ambiguity inherent in every image "and the way in which images possess this kind of reversible aspect. That's what makes them ambiguous. It applies to everything."

 

He uses a range of techniques: animation, sculpture and photography to expand and explode the very notion of the image. "For me an image is not necessarily this two-dimensional thing like a photograph or a picture. An image is also a psychological projection that you have in your mind. A moment can become an image, because it impresses itself on your memory," he says.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Critic's Notebook: 'Gatsby,' 'Gatz' and the fallacy of adaptation - Los Angeles Times

Critic's Notebook: 'Gatsby,' 'Gatz' and the fallacy of adaptation - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Critic's Notebook: 'Gatsby,' 'Gatz' and the fallacy of adaptation Los Angeles Times That's not a criticism — Fitzgerald was a popular novelist as well as a literary one, and he knew how to move a narrative along.

 

What's remarkable about "The Great Gatsby" is that it does this in a neat and tidy 189 pages. It is, in other words, a great American novel as opposed to the Great American Novel — the mythic beast that is another emblem of the excess at our core. You could read it in an afternoon, which may be what first drew the New York theater company Elevator Repair Service to adapt it for the stage show "Gatz." Unfortunately, I found the production problematic for a lot of reasons, beginning with its narrative conceit, in which a man in an office reads the book aloud to his co-workers while waiting for his computer to be fixed.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Horror-master novelist Stephen King talks writing tips, sequel to 'The Shining ... - Victoria Times Colonist

Kansas City Star Horror-master novelist Stephen King talks writing tips, sequel to 'The Shining .

 

"I've always wondered who I am when I write," King said, "because once I'm doing it, I'm not in the room with myself."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Gods can teach us - just don't worship them - ABC Online

Gods can teach us - just don't worship them - ABC Online | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
ABC Online Gods can teach us - just don't worship them ABC OnlineThis is the basic nature of myth. Any one myth "is always a tree with many branches," Calasso said recently in the Paris Review.

 

Must secularists be wary of gods? As political and ethical authorities, yes. As guarantors of knowledge, yes. But as literary inventions? Not at all.

 

Most obviously, this is because gods reveal a great deal about the human condition. Humans invent (or borrow) the gods we need. It's telling to see what we make of them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The discovery of Mars in literature - OUPblog (blog)

The discovery of Mars in literature - OUPblog (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
OUPblog (blog) The discovery of Mars in literature

 

Although there had been interest in Mars earlier, towards the end of the nineteenth century there was a sudden surge of novels describing travel to the red planet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

At Swim Two Birds – Flann O'Brien « Living with Literature

At Swim Two Birds – Flann O'Brien « Living with Literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

At Swim Two Birds follows an unnamed university student writing his first novel in-between classes and pub visits, Pooka McPhillimey, a member of the devil class, author Dermot Trellis, who (unknowingly) creates a cast of conscious characters who are none to happy about their creator’s ruling hand, and Fin Mac Cool & Mad King Sweeney, two Irish folk legends. By the end of the story, we wonder who is writing who? An admirer and friend of Joyce (who would’ve thought?), the fellow Irishman confines an excessively meta-world in his debut novel.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

TDKR review: Blu-ray trilogy brings art of Batman and his psychology to life - Examiner.com

TDKR review: Blu-ray trilogy brings art of Batman and his psychology to life - Examiner.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Examiner.com TDKR review: Blu-ray trilogy brings art of Batman and his psychology to life

 

The visceral appeal of The Dark Knight Trilogy on Blu Ray grabs me on two levels. One as a former literature major, I'm stunned by the psychology of Batman and how it plays out in the canon of literature and in these films. And two as a would-be artist and designer my appreciation for director Christopher Nolan's ability to translate the Dark Knight's psychology into stunning visuals on film is almost beyond measure.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A Year in Reading: Michael Schaub - The Millions

A Year in Reading: Michael Schaub - The Millions | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A Year in Reading: Michael Schaub The Millions...

In the years since I lost my brother, I’ve been thinking a lot about the moral force of literature, which didn’t mean much to me as a smirking faux-postmodernist teenager, but means everything to me now. May We Be Forgiven is a deeply moral novel, though it’s never moralistic. The characters cheat on their spouses; they lie and neglect and even murder. Homes keeps a distance throughout; she’s not judgmental, but neither is she naive enough to presume that we won’t, or shouldn’t, judge one another. One of the book’s main characters — in absentia, obviously — is the famously amoral President Richard Nixon, about whom Harold, a historian, is writing a book.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

And this, after all, is why we read.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Rehabilitation through reading: an opportunity to self-reflect and ...

Rehabilitation through reading: an opportunity to self-reflect and ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Reflection: When offenders openly analyze their own lives through literary characters, they get a chance for inner reflection that they may never have explored before. They put themselves in the spotlight for self-examination.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Top 8 Post-Apocalyptic Films - 411mania.com

The Top 8 Post-Apocalyptic Films - 411mania.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The 8 Ball 12.11.12: The Top 8 Post-Apocalyptic Films

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

10 great works of literature to use in your classroom - The Guardian (blog)

10 great works of literature to use in your classroom - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Guardian (blog) 10 great works of literature to use in your classroom

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

An extraordinary mother-daughter pair: Louisa May Alcott and her mother

An extraordinary mother-daughter pair: Louisa May Alcott and her mother | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Two new books by Eve LaPlante look into the extraordinary relationship between author Louisa May Alcott and her mother, Abigail May Alcott.

 

Abigail May Alcott, called Marmee by her four daughters, was the obvious model for the wise and beloved matriarch in Louisa’s best-selling book “Little Women.” But as LaPlante points out in her new biography, the real-life mother was more vociferous than her fictional namesake. Abigail was an ardent woman who chafed against convention and was an early advocate for women’s suffrage and the abolition of slavery.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Next Page: In praise of the massive, sprawling 19th-century novel (or, un ... - Pittsburgh Post Gazette

The Next Page: In praise of the massive, sprawling 19th-century novel (or, un ... - Pittsburgh Post Gazette | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Next Page: In praise of the massive, sprawling 19th-century novel

 

The book publishing industry today is financially tethered to the movie industry. When movie producers believe a novel can be translated into a successful film, they pay handsomely for the rights, and if the resulting movie does become a hit, its success can lead to vastly increased sales of the book. Many editors therefore dream of acquiring novels that will be adapted into movies. Books by authors like Dan Brown and Michael Crichton, indeed, read like blueprints for films.

 

Novels, however, are not movies or even screenplays. A typical screenplay is only about a 120 pages long, double-spaced. Of all the words therein, only the dialogue makes it into the movie as verbal information. The other words on the page suggest to the director and cameraman what they are to shoot and to actors how they are to move and behave.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Familiar - Online Literature Magazine

Familiar - Online Literature Magazine | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Com – Online Literature Magazine.  ... Call it the literature of the ontological wrong turn. 

 

In Familiar, J. Robert Lennon continues his profound and exhilarating exploration of the surreal undercurrents of contemporary American life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Power of Fiction | Psychology Today

The Power of Fiction | Psychology Today | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

A skilled writer writes from the vantage point of a person's truth, about psychological understanding of themselves, who they love, or she invites others to go on a journey with fictional characters.

 

In fiction you don’t have to come to a single way to respond to what’s being written about, you may even experience ambiguity. Fiction can prompt a reader to rethink previous positions on the issues at hand, about characters; the reader may go deeper than they’ve gone before emotionally. Enlarging their perspectives. In fiction, writers aim to move our hearts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Christopher Tolkien Laments The 'Evisceration' Of His Father's Work - Business Insider

Christopher Tolkien Laments The 'Evisceration' Of His Father's Work - Business Insider | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Business Insider Christopher Tolkien Laments The 'Evisceration' Of His Father's Work

 

Christopher Tolkien's reserve has a very different explanation: the enormous gap, almost an abyss, which has been created between his father's writings and their commercial descendants -- work he does not recognize, especially since New Zealand film-maker Peter Jackson made Lord of the Rings, three phenomenally successful films, between 2001 and 2003. Over the years, a sort of parallel universe has formed around Tolkien's work, a world of sparkling images and of figurines, colored by the original books of the cult, but often very different from them, like a continent that has drifted far from its original land mass.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Why are writers not weathering the storm? - Irish Times

Why are writers not weathering the storm? - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Irish Times Why are writers not weathering the storm? Irish TimesIn literary fiction, global warming rarely makes its presence felt.

 

if climate change is the elephant in the room in political culture, it is also curiously under-represented in contemporary literature; the fallout from the ongoing exploitation of the Earth’s natural resources is largely ignored in the present-day fictional landscape.Is there such a thing as contemporary eco-literature, and who are the writers best examining this most fundamental challenge to human existence? In literary fiction, global warming rarely makes its presence felt. Radically changed weather systems are occasionally evoked as a metaphorical reflection of psychological landscapes (think of the unusual snow that dominates Anne Enright’s The Forgotten Waltz), but they are rarely the central focus of the plot nor, indeed, a theme.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit - NPR (blog)

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit - NPR (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
NPR (blog) Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit

 

the feminist complaints came from 19th century, upper class Irish critics who argued that peasant women shouldn't be wasting their time — and limited resources — on tea. If women had time to sit down and enjoy a tea break, this must mean they were ignoring their domestic duties and instead, perhaps, opening the door to political engagement or even rebellion."Drinking tea was thought to threaten traditional ways," explains researcher Helen O'Connell of Durham University in the UK. In the 1800s, tea was an affront to the virtues of frugality and restraint, which underpinned rural Irish culture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Purple Noon - slantmagazine

Purple Noon - slantmagazine | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Purple Noon slantmagazineHow could auteurs as disjunctive as Minghella, Cavani, and Hitchcock have failed to realize that all of Highsmith's fleeted, concrete details derive their wicked power from psychological context?

 

One can't help but wonder if Patricia Highsmith's crime novels aren't intended to dupe film directors. As deeply cinematic as the author's morally contorted and readily visual style appears, adaptations of her work tend to traffic an indefinable lifelessness: They're thrillers trapped in quicksand. How could auteurs as disjunctive as Minghella, Cavani, and Hitchcock have failed to realize that all of Highsmith's fleeted, concrete details derive their wicked power from psychological context? Her deception is masterly: She makes the abstract not only seem concrete, but like a concrete surface, and therefore reproducible. Her Tom Ripley books are voiced in a nimble, rhythmic third person that says only precisely what needs to be seen and heard at any given moment. And yet they never stray far from the emotional perspective—the juicy, churning thoughts and affects—of their central con-artist-cum-murderer.

more...
No comment yet.