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Season of the witch casts a powerful spell on culture – and empowers teenage girls - The Guardian

Season of the witch casts a powerful spell on culture – and empowers teenage girls - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Guardian
Season of the witch casts a powerful spell on culture – and empowers teenage girls

 

it is on television that the season of the witch has truly taken hold. In addition to American Horror Story, with its tale of voodoo queens and teenage witches, there's Lifetime's The Witches of East End, adapted from a novel by Melissa de la Cruz and featuring a family of spellcasters led by Julia Ormond. Vampire Diaries spinoff The Originals (on the Syfy channel) has a central storyline about witchcraft and in Universal's Sleepy Hollow,Ichabod Crane deals with duelling covens in present-day America.

 

So why witches – and why now? "The idea of being able to manipulate supernatural forces still resonates," says Owen Davies, professor of social history at the University of Hertfordshire and author of America Bewitched: The Story of Witchcraft after Salem. "Witches and ghosts speak to something fundamental and innate in our psyche. It's an emotional connection."

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Book Talk: Best-selling author James Patterson reflects on success - GMA News

Book Talk: Best-selling author James Patterson reflects on success - GMA News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Book Talk: Best-selling author James Patterson reflects on success
GMA News

 

The three rules of this kind of fiction for me are story, story, story. I'm telling a story, and I sort of have the sense that I'm talking to one person and I don't want them to get up until I'm finished. And the books are emotional. I think I'm pretty emotional. I think that's one of my strengths and I think that comes through to people.

There are a lot of thrillers that are exciting, but there isn't much humanity to them. I do create characters that people are comfortable with and that they want to know what happened to them next. Even the villains, I think, there's just a humanity to them as diabolical as they may be, there's something recognizably human, which I think is one of the keys to creating villains that are interesting.

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How Amazon and Goodreads could lose their best readers - Salon

How Amazon and Goodreads could lose their best readers - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Salon

How Amazon and Goodreads could lose their best readers

 

But if, at a casual glance, the two companies — Goodreads and Amazon — seem to be made for each other, look again. A small but growing faction of longtime, deeply involved Goodreads members are up in arms about recent changes to the site’s enforcement of its policies on what members are permitted to say when reviewing books, and many of them blame the crackdown on the Amazon deal. They’ve staged a protest of sorts, albeit one that’s happening mostly out of the public eye. Their charge is censorship and their accusation is, in the words of one rebel, that Goodreads and Amazon want “to kill the vibrant, creative community that was once here, and replace it with a canned community of automaton book cheerleaders.”

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

It's nearly impossible to keep up with all these literary rivalries. Fortunately, Salon's Laura Miller has this one covered in depth.

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What's Behind the Notion That Nonfiction Is More 'Relevant' Than Fiction? - New York Times

What's Behind the Notion That Nonfiction Is More 'Relevant' Than Fiction? - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
New York Times
What's Behind the Notion That Nonfiction Is More 'Relevant' Than Fiction?

 

Each week in Bookends, two writers take on pressing and provocative questions about the world of books. This week, Rivka Galchen and Pankaj Mishra discuss the boundaries of fiction and nonfiction, and the way each form reflects the world in which we live.

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Birte Hella's comment, October 23, 2013 10:21 PM
went to article, read it, and shared on Twitter... Thanks.
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Fear Factory - Detroit Metro Times

Fear Factory - Detroit Metro Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Detroit Metro Times

Fear Factory

 

Edgar Allen Poe, arguably the godfather of the horror genre (as well as the detective story), invented the template for horror literature back in the 19th century through mostly psychological excursions into dark recesses of the human condition. 

 

Then, in the 1920s and ’30s, Howard Phillips Lovecraft (better known as H.P. Lovecraft) repurposed that 19th century brand of horror to something more in line with the tastes of a blossoming 20th century.

 

Horror, be it in the form of the supernatural or the psychological, has been employed by such renowned literary writers as Henry James and William Faulkner, Virginia Woolf and Joyce Carol Oates.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A lot of articles about horror literature in the days leading up to Halloween

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Journey into the dark - The West Australian

Journey into the dark - The West Australian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Journey into the dark
The West Australian

 

Audaciously manipulating and misleading his readers while stretching the possibilities of the crime series format is par for the course for Nesbo, who clearly enjoys his "contract with the reader", but admits "every Harry Hole book I finish I have to take time off from because it is sort of a dark universe. Then a few months will pass and I will start longing to get back to that dark universe."

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An introduction to Scandinavian crime novelist Jo Nesbo through his latest novel, "Police"

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Sartre wins and declines Nobel Prize — History.com This Day in History — 10/22/1964

Sartre wins and declines Nobel Prize — History.com This Day in History — 10/22/1964 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

On this day in 1964, Jean-Paul Sartre is awarded the Nobel Prize for literature, which he declines.

 

In his novels, essays, and plays, Sartre advanced the philosophy of existentialism, arguing that each individual must create meaning for his or her own life, because life itself had no innate meaning.

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Our Veiw: Welcoming a new international city of literature - Iowa City Press Citizen

Our Veiw: Welcoming a new international city of literature
Iowa City Press Citizen

 

When first recognized by UNESCO as an international City of Literature back in 2008, Iowa City entered a very exclusive group in which the only other members were Edinburgh, Scotland, and Melbourne, Australia.

The list expanded in 2010 to include the very deserving Dublin, Ireland; then expanded again in 2011 to include the group’s first non-English-speaking member: Reykjavik, Iceland; and then further expanded in 2012 to include Norwich, England.

 

On Monday, UNESCO announced a seventh international city of literature: Krakow, Poland.

 

For Americans, Krakow might not seem as obvious a selection as Dublin — especially given the Irish capital’s well-known literary connections to authors such as Jonathan Swift, James Joyce and Roddy Doyle. But glancing through Krakow’s 66-page application (available at http://bit.ly/19okLtw), it’s clear that the city not only is the cultural capital of Poland, it’s also one of the main cultural capitals of Eastern Europe.

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“Roth Unbound”: The author as literary hero, despite a checkered past - Salon

“Roth Unbound”: The author as literary hero, despite a checkered past - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Salon

“Roth Unbound”: The author as literary hero, despite a checkered past

 

Claudia Roth Pierpont’s “Roth Unbound: A Writer and His Books” marks the beginning of Philip Roth’s attempt to curate his legacy.  A “hybrid” that deviates from the standard form of critical biography by virtue of the fact that Roth sat down with Pierpont for what appears to be months of conversations about every facet of his life and work, Pierpont’s book is the first on Roth to appear since his announced retirement last year, and will no doubt profoundly affect the man’s reputation going forward.

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'How to Read a Novelist': encountering literary all-stars - The Seattle Times

'How to Read a Novelist': encountering literary all-stars - The Seattle Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
'How to Read a Novelist': encountering literary all-stars
The Seattle Times

 

Though its title has shades of a Ph.D. thesis, John Freeman’s new collection, “How to Read a Novelist” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 384 pp., $15), is not a work of criticism, but rather an engaging, accessible series of encounters with dozens of the best writers working in the last 15 years.

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Why All the Fuss About Proust? - Wall Street Journal

Why All the Fuss About Proust? - Wall Street Journal | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Why All the Fuss About Proust?
Wall Street Journal

 

Proust is interested in minutiae because life, as he sees it, is seldom ever about things, but about our impression of things, not about facts, but about the interpretation of facts, not about one particular feeling but about a confluence of conflicting feelings. Everything is elusive in Proust, because nothing is ever certain. He isn't interested in characters the way Tolstoy and Dickens are interested in characters; he is interested in the vivisection of identity, in people who turn out to be everything they claim they are not, in relationships that are always inscrutably opaque, in situations that conceal an underside that ends up flattering neither the betrayer nor the betrayed. It is Proust's implacable honesty, his reluctance to cut corners or to articulate what might have been good enough or credible enough in any other writer that make him the introspective genius he is.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at the importance of Proust, in anticipation of next month's 100th anniversary of the publication of "Swann's Way," the first volume of Proust's six-volume masterpiece "In Search of Lost Time"

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Where Alice Munro found her stories - Toronto Star

Where Alice Munro found her stories - Toronto Star | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Where Alice Munro found her stories
Toronto Star

 

Another woman recalled her mother-in-law saying, after reading Lives of Girls and Women, “Alice Munro should be ashamed of herself,” because the people in her stories seemed so vividly recognizable — and often didn’t fare well in Munro’s fictionalized version.

 

Such is the fate of writers like Munro, keen observers who write about what they know best — their own hometowns and the people in them. The local people are delighted that one of their own has put the town on the world’s literary map. But there can also be a darker undercurrent of resentment and outright hostility.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An interesting take on the relationship between life and fiction

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Exploring the nature of storytelling, reality - The Jersey Journal - NJ.com

Exploring the nature of storytelling, reality
The Jersey Journal - NJ.com

 

For those who do not know, “The Unwritten” is about Tommy Taylor, son of author Wilson Taylor, creator of the wildly popular “Tommy Taylor and…” series of books. At the beginning of the series, Tommy has very little in his life and survives mainly by banking on the existence of his fictional counterpart within the “Tommy Taylor” books. The “Unwritten” begins with high aspirations, reaching into the true magic of fiction and imagination. It is clear after the first issue that the series will explore the murky borderlands between reality and fiction, and the relationship between all those who partake in the ancient relationship of storyteller, story and audience.

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Alex Miller: 'These characters have been me' – interview - The Guardian

Alex Miller: 'These characters have been me' – interview - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Alex Miller: 'These characters have been me' – interview

The Guardian

 

Miller seems to be always looking for complexity, genuinely interested in the people he meets, fossicking for the ways people resist being typecast. “We are all unusual individuals – none of us fits the stereotype perfectly, even if we’re trying to.”

 

Long diagnosed with “cowboy syndrome” – a reluctance to show or share personal emotions, or, as Miller describes it, “an absolute determination to have my autonomy” – the writer has always had a very strong sense of self. “Becoming a writer was about claiming my own autonomy from ever doing anything or saying anything or writing anything I didn’t believe in.”

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The Counselor: A-list cast outshined by Cormac McCarthy's hellbound script - The Globe and Mail

The Counselor: A-list cast outshined by Cormac McCarthy's hellbound script - The Globe and Mail | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
San Francisco Chronicle

The Counselor: A-list cast outshined by Cormac McCarthy's hellbound script

The Globe and Mail

 

In this doomed flirtation with fate, a game of chance played against the coldest house of them all, the Counselor is joining a team of certified losers who will be familiar to anyone who’s read McCarthy – you’ll recognize the similarly suicidal chance taken by the fortune-finding protagonist of No Country – and anyone who’s visited the literary or cinematic terrain the author evokes: the scorched-earth world of crime fiction practised by the likes of Dashiell Hammett, Jim Thompson and Patricia Highsmith, and the shadow-stricken world of film noir. In these traditions, the forces of darkness never have to recruit. They just sit patiently waiting for people to come knocking, which they always do.

 

It is the nature of people in these fictional worlds to do wrong: not because they are bad (though some are), or because they are stupid (though some are), or even because they are duped (though some are), but because it’s in people to damn themselves if the price is right. Call it Satan’s advantage: If God has to work to win people over to His side, the Devil just lets human nature take its course.

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Unveiling the mystery behind Mrs. Poe's past - Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

Unveiling the mystery behind Mrs. Poe's past - Fort Wayne Journal Gazette | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Unveiling the mystery behind Mrs. Poe's past
Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

 

[Lynn Cullen's] latest book, “Mrs. Poe,” released earlier this month, is the story of Frances Locke Osgood and her relationship with the poet Edgar Allen [sic] Poe.

. . .

“I’m always listening for my characters to tell me their story,” Cullen said. “They surprise me all the time. Having a character find me is one of the highs of being a novelist.”

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Ex-Mossad spy's fiction fascination - Jerusalem Post

Ex-Mossad spy's fiction fascination - Jerusalem Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Ex-Mossad spy's fiction fascination
Jerusalem Post

 

For retired Israeli spy Mishka Ben-David, writing fiction was a realization of artistic aspirations he had long suppressed.

Ben-David had a doctorate in Hebrew literature and four books published when the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad recruited him in 1987. He agreed to avoid the authorial limelight as he embarked on a career of surveillance and subterfuge. . . .

Ben-David, 61, spoke to Reuters at his home near Jerusalem about the benefits and drawbacks of taking creative inspiration from real-life espionage.

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Why Do We Watch Horror Films? Some Want To Understand Archetypal Fears ... - Medical Daily

Why Do We Watch Horror Films? Some Want To Understand Archetypal Fears ... - Medical Daily | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Medical Daily
Why Do We Watch Horror Films? Some Want To Understand Archetypal Fears ...

 

Torture. Demented, gory Nazi-like science experiments conducted by mad scientists. And people being killed by bloodthirsty, diseased fellow humans. Horror movies take on all these dark, twisted, and just plain frightful storylines. But why do we watch them? It turns out that there are many reasons: Some people want to watch something that addresses their archetypal fears, while others just want to go along for the psychological ride.

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Storycraft: Fiction's Inner Landscape: Point of View and Interiority in ...

Storycraft: Fiction's Inner Landscape: Point of View and Interiority in ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Jim Harrison has long held a prominent place on my shelf of great American writers. I love his affirmative and highly spiritual vision of nature’s place in humanity’s consciousness, and I love the wild beauty of his descriptive prose. One of the things he does best is portraying the thoughts and feelings of his characters: what some writers call “interiority.”

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An excellent introduction to this topic

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Meet Caesar, man of letters, says Stanford’s Christopher Krebs

Meet Caesar, man of letters, says Stanford’s Christopher Krebs | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Professor of classics revisits Julius Caesar’s time-honored work "The Gallic War," revealing that beneath the military garb prowled a man of supreme intellectual abilities.

 

Glorious general, cunning politician, ruler of the mighty Roman Empire: this is the Julius Caesar we have long known.

 

But this appears to be only half the story, according to Stanford Classics Professor Christopher Krebs. A specialist in ancient Roman literature, Krebs notes that, apart from his well-known military exploits, Caesar was a man of letters who saw eye to eye with the famed Roman orator Cicero; a prolific writer and skilled linguist; and commissioner of the Julian calendar.

 

It is this lesser-known Caesar – the literary virtuoso rather than the conqueror of Gaul – whom Krebs describes in a new project he calls "Caesar 2.0." His research involves reading Caesar's main surviving text, the Commentarii de Bello Gallico (also known as The Gallic War), in an entirely new way: as a piece of literary art and a product of its cultural context rather than as a straightforward military journal.

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Reissuing: How Jacket2 Is Saving Literary Magazine History

Reissuing: How Jacket2 Is Saving Literary Magazine History | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Reissues directly tackles the biggest problem in contemporary literary magazine readership and scholarship: historical access.

 

Danny Snelson and company have the most exciting ongoing digital archive project for literary magazines going on at Jacket2—titled, appropriately, Reissues. Reissues directly tackles the biggest problem in contemporary literary magazine readership and scholarship: historical access.

 

A big problem with 20th century (read: pre-internet) literary magazines is access. Literary magazines reasonably strive to be both timely and timeless—so that then, unlike novels, new issues are constantly eclipsing previous issues, which then disappear from public bookstores and many private bookshelves. Literary magazines are by definition in a constant state of self-replacement. And this “vanishing” problem is no doubt more dire in the independent, avant-garde periodical world, where magazines—and so their archives—lack the longevity offered from institutional support. And of course before literary publishing was common on the internet, there was almost certainly no digital life for these publications accessible online.

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Waiting for new literature - vestnik kavkaza

Waiting for new literature - vestnik kavkaza | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Waiting for new literature

vestnik kavkaza

 

Sergei Filatov, the chairman of the Union of Writers of Moscow, said: “At the beginning of the project "Young Writers of Russia" there was the hope that we will prepare a young group of writers that will make a turning point, in general, in our literature. From the period when it did not exist there was some time after the collapse of the Soviet Union, when we began to read mostly books that have come to us from our writers from abroad once exiled from the Soviet Union. But all the time we lived in anticipation of new literature. But the emergence of new literature, in general, quite frankly, has been delayed. Moreover, the disorder of a writer’s life, the lack of social protection, the lack of status of the writer in Russia today - all these problems are, in general, quite acute, and they've come out to the surface. So today there is a serious need to create a new literary community, which would include all the elements that help the development of literature and delivering the writer's work to our readers. There will be libraries, publishing houses, a book distribution system there. I believe that the basis in this case should be our literary journals”.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Russia waits for the emergence of new writers after the fall of the Soviet Union.

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The Cherokee trail that led to a killing: David Vann on his family history - The Independent

The Independent
The Cherokee trail that led to a killing: David Vann on his family history

 

Discovering his Cherokee heritage has taught Vann that “we’re shaped by legacies beyond our experience” and his corpse-strewn fiction consistently examines how the living reckon with what the dead leave behind. He describes his acclaimed story collection, Legend of a Suicide (2009), as “psychological revenge” on his father, who killed himself when Vann was 13. His previous novels, Dirt (2012) and Caribou Island (2011), also depict characters who are trying to come to terms with trauma.

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Ammonites & Leaping Fish: A Life in Time by Penelope Lively – review

Ammonites & Leaping Fish: A Life in Time by Penelope Lively – review | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Penelope Lively charts the story of her life via her six most treasured possessions in this powerful memoir

 

It's hard to know how to describe Penelope Lively's new book. At first, I thought she'd joined Diana Athill, Jane Miller and others in sending us a helpful and inquiring dispatch from the realms of old age (Lively is 80, with the result, she tells us, that people in their 60s seem not young exactly, but "nicely mature"). It turns out, though, that Ammonites & Leaping Fish is not precisely this kind of thing. Aches and pains are kept to a minimum; so, too, is the confusing behaviour of the young; death is mentioned hardly at all. The result is less of a memoir than a ledger on which its author has noted some of the objects and memories that, in this final stage of life, continue to tether her to the world that made her.

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Carl Jung Circle: Circus of Dreams - BusinessWorld Online Edition

Carl Jung Circle: Circus of Dreams - BusinessWorld Online Edition | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Carl Jung Circle: Circus of Dreams

BusinessWorld Online Edition

 

The Carl Jung Circle Center (CJCC) is an organization of professionals -- psychologists, counselors, psychiatrists, development workers, artists, advertising and business executives, and educators who advocate the analytical psychology of Carl Jung. It will present its fourth exhibition, an art fair, in November.

    Dr. Dido Gustilo Villasor, CJCC chair remarked, “[The art fair] Circus of Dreams is the third time that artist using different mediums are coming together to express unique images and symbol of the self.”
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This exhibition is taking place in the Philippenes. Wouldn't it be great if there were similar organizations and exhibitions in other places, too?

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