Literature & Psychology
9.7K views | +4 today
Literature & Psychology
interdisciplinary explorations
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Hard lines for hard times: American novelist Robert Stone talks about his pessimistic heart - The National

Hard lines for hard times: American novelist Robert Stone talks about his pessimistic heart - The National | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The National
Hard lines for hard times: American novelist Robert Stone talks about his pessimistic heart

 

For Stone, the plot twists are secondary to his efforts to observe, describe and critique contemporary America. “I think I was writing about the ways things are now, the ways things have become over the course of my lifetime, which is pretty long.” When I ask what he means by these “things”, his response hits that pessimistic note mentioned in the opening quote. “The selfishness, the dispensing with responsibility on any serious level. It really is about selfishness, about greed, self-satisfaction. A loss of perspective that we might have hoped we had been born with that is somehow disappearing.”

 

The tone of righteous anger is hard to miss as Stone launches broadsides against America’s economic inequality, class divides, religious fundamentalism, secular self-satisfaction and moral crises from mental health to sexuality, family to education.

 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

About Robert Stone's recent novel "Death of the Black-Haired Girl "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

James Ellroy's 'Perfidia' - New York Times

James Ellroy's 'Perfidia' - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
New York Times

James Ellroy's 'Perfidia'

 

Few writers, once established in the public consciousness, have changed their style as drastically as James Ellroy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Washington DC in books: readers' picks - The Guardian (blog)

Washington DC in books: readers' picks - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)
Washington DC in books: readers' picks

 

Family dramas, political intrigues, multiculturalism, and much more. From Ralph Ellison to Norah Ephron, if you’re planning a visit to the US capital, here’s your reading sorted – as suggested by our readers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

September 2014's Best Books: 12 Fiction Must-Reads for Your Imagination to RUN WILD THIS FALL - Bustle

September 2014's Best Books: 12 Fiction Must-Reads for Your Imagination to RUN WILD THIS FALL

 

Luckily for us, publishers kick things into high gear in September, dishing out a slew of brilliant releases, so you can expect quite a demanding course load. Including a post-apocalyptic novel that meditates on art and Shakespeare and a charming, gritty coming-of-age comedy, a delightfully dark short-story collection penned by the prolific Margaret Atwood and a riveting drama the illuminates the nuances of postwar 1920s London, these are the best September has to offer. With our carefully curated syllabus you’ll explore the anatomy of dreams alongside a pair of sleep researchers, grapple with legal dilemmas tangled in religious and moral conflicts, and gain some basic medical training while touring the inner world of emergency medical care.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Time Travel Simulation Resolves “Grandfather Paradox” - Scientific American

Time Travel Simulation Resolves “Grandfather Paradox” - Scientific American | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Time Travel Simulation Resolves “Grandfather Paradox”

Scientific American

 

What would happen to you if you went back in time and killed your grandfather? A model using photons reveals that quantum mechanics can solve the quandary—and even foil quantum cryptography

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Sense of Style review – lessons in how to write - The Guardian

The Sense of Style review – lessons in how to write - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian

The Sense of Style review – lessons in how to write

 

Most of us have strong views about how best to use language; where the more intricate details are concerned, those views are often an amalgam of aesthetic taste, ingrained social prejudice, popular myth and a form of reasoning that we insist is logic though it may smell like something else.

 

In The Sense of Style, Steven Pinker cheerfully launches himself on to this terrain. The Harvard psychology professor is a rigorous thinker whose previous books, including The Language Instinct and The Stuff of Thought, have been distinguished by a flair for making highly technical subjects seem not just accessible but positively jaunty. Now his distaste for the deathly edicts that glut most current volumes on literary style has led him to create what he calls "a writing guide for the 21st century".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Cut it out, Ian McEwan: there are plenty of great long novels

Cut it out, Ian McEwan: there are plenty of great long novels | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Alison Flood: The author says only a few 'earn their length' and he reads them itching to edit. But I can think of plenty of terrific giant stories – can't you?
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Shouldn't all novels be as long as they need to be, but no longer?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

'We Are Not Ourselves' is a rendering of the effect of Alzheimer's on one family - Washington Post

'We Are Not Ourselves' is a rendering of the effect of Alzheimer's on one family - Washington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
'We Are Not Ourselves' is a rendering of the effect of Alzheimer's on one family

Washington Post

 

We see, through Eileen’s experience, that when memory is gone, precious little is left. Alzheimer’s creates a very particular kind of horror: The loss of family bonds, of a life’s hard work, of everything that defines a person. Thomas masterfully captures this affliction, sparing us no detail in rendering the emotional, physical and financial toll it takes on a family.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Meet L. Frank Baum, the man behind the curtain - Kansas City Star

Meet L. Frank Baum, the man behind the curtain - Kansas City Star | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Meet L. Frank Baum, the man behind the curtain
Kansas City Star
He sold axle grease, fine china and prize-winning chickens, made and lost fortunes and changed the course of children's literature. ....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

NYC Chancellor Pushes for Schools to Reinstate Independent-Reading Time - Education Week News (blog)

NYC Chancellor Pushes for Schools to Reinstate Independent-Reading Time - Education Week News (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
NYC Chancellor Pushes for Schools to Reinstate Independent-Reading Time
Education Week News (blog)

 

Carmen Fariña, the new schools chancellor in New York City, is bringing the specifics of classroom reading instruction back into the public eye.

 

As I wrote in July, Fariña is a fan of "balanced literacy," an approach to reading instruction that was once mandated in the city but has since been abandoned by many schools. At the heart of the approach is an emphasis on independent reading, also known as "sustained silent reading" or "drop everything and read."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

5 Twisted Thrillers For 'Gone Girl' Fans - Huffington Post (blog)

5 Twisted Thrillers For 'Gone Girl' Fans - Huffington Post (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
5 Twisted Thrillers For 'Gone Girl' Fans
Huffington Post (blog)

 

As the film campaign for David Fincher's adaptation of Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl slowly but steadily barrels ahead (see the most recent trailer here), I can't help but remember why I was addicted to the novel. Flynn has previously proved her literary finesse (Sharp Objects, Dark Places) for crafting multi-layered characters that speak to the uglier sides of human nature.

 

These five indie titles may curb your appetite for the film until in opens on October 3rd.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

History and literary homage raise great expectations

History and literary homage raise great expectations | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
I

Ideas of secret selves and the places where these may be uncovered power a lithe, sprinting plot in The Paying Guests, a novel that pays homage to writers including Dickens. One of its protagonists originates from Walworth and retreats there during a crisis.

. . .

With the intricate plotting of Dickens and the gothic textures of the novels of the Bronte sisters, Waters blurs the lines of Victorian fiction by bringing the hidden sexual world into the light, reframing erotic secrets in marvels of pseudo-Victorian crafting.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Review of "The Paying Guests" by Sarah Waters

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Government-Funded Writing Careers - OZY

Government-Funded Writing Careers - OZY | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
OZY

Government-Funded Writing Careers

 

LLiterary patronage is an old problem, one that today is increasingly solved by mega-corporations: a mobile phone company funds one of England’s top literary prizes, the Orange; a financial services firm backs the Man Booker Prize; and Amtrak’s “writers’ residencies” — which give people free long-distance train rides on which they may write — isn’t the weirdest way writers have found a monetary safety net. But before this era of private sector funding, there was a time when many writers got their start with public funds — through government programs. Some of these were designed to inspire the creatives, and others did so entirely by accident.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Project Hieroglyph: Fighting society's dystopian future - BBC News

Project Hieroglyph: Fighting society's dystopian future - BBC News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
BBC News

Project Hieroglyph: Fighting society's dystopian future

 

Pop culture has painted a darkly dystopian vision of the future. But a new book hopes to harness the power of science fiction to plot out a more optimistic path for the real world.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

'Risk of Reading': UMass Dartmouth professor releases new book - Fall River Herald News

'Risk of Reading': UMass Dartmouth professor releases new book
Fall River Herald News

 

UMass Dartmouth English Professor Robert Waxler’s newest book “The Risk of Reading: How Literature Helps Us to Understand Ourselves and the World,” out in paperback and hardcover version this month, explores the implications of modern life through the reading of significant literary works. The author defends the need for “fiction” to give “real life” meaning. Bloomsbury Publishing, an award-winning company in New York City and London, is the publisher for “The Risk of Reading.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A Stranger Genius of Literature, Back When He Used Words - TheStranger.com

A Stranger Genius of Literature, Back When He Used Words - TheStranger.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A Stranger Genius of Literature, Back When He Used Words
TheStranger.com

 

tranger Genius of literature Jim Woodring is best known for his series of books starring Frank, a cartoon character who lives in a dreamlike world called the Unifactor. In these books, Frank—a “holy fool,” to use Woodring’s description, who resembles a mouse, a cat, a dog, or a perverted miscegenation between Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny depending on which way you squint—bumbles through adventures often involving nightmarish menaces who come to the Unifactor and threaten to upturn the placidity of Frank’s life. They’re entirely wordless; Frank is a Chaplinesque mute, and the vocabulary of the Unifactor is either pre- or post-literate, depending on whether you suspect Woodring considers his characters to embody a vocabulary of their own, spelling out a mysterious grammar on the page.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A 21st Century Literary Atlas of Europe | Book Patrol

A 21st Century Literary Atlas of Europe | Book Patrol | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Where is literature set and why?

 

Where is literature set and why?

 

For over a hundred years “literary criticism has been struggling with the question of how best to depict literary spaces on maps in an adequate and objectively accurate manner”

 

Combining the fields of literary geography and cartography researchers at the Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation in Zurich have been at work since 2006 compiling new interactive tools to assist researchers and others with an interest in literature and place.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

'The Twilight Zone' - OZY

'The Twilight Zone' - OZY | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
OZY
'The Twilight Zone'

 

It’s been 55 years since The Twilight Zone first aired, and it can be easy to look back and see it as tame, naive, maybe even a bit corny — but only if you deny the show’s context. In the late 1950s, no television show dared air such thought-provoking material. Mostly free from the heavy-handed interference of sponsors, Serling was able to fully flesh out controversial subject matter, sometimes thinly couched in science fiction or fantasy, sometimes stark and obvious. Weighty topics such as race, poverty and war were broached alongside more personal topics; loss of innocence, mental illness, alienation and myriad fears.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Gail Sheehy Books Passage to the Past - Daily Beast

Gail Sheehy Books Passage to the Past - Daily Beast | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Gail Sheehy Books Passage to the Past

Daily Beast S

 

he legendary journalist and ‘Passages’ author talks about her new memoir, the glory days of the new journalism, and the denizens of Grey Gardens.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Samuel Johnson prize 2014 longlist spotlights memoirs - The Guardian

Samuel Johnson prize 2014 longlist spotlights memoirs - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Samuel Johnson prize 2014 longlist spotlights memoirs

 

From artist Marion Coutts's searingly honest account of her husband's death from a brain tumour to Helen Macdonald's story of how she tamed a goshawk after her father died, memoirs dominate the longlist for the Samuel Johnson prize this year, in a line-up which the acclaimed biographer Claire Tomalin said shows "that non-fiction is certainly stranger and wilder than fiction".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Grace And Danger: A Flannery O'Connor Retrospective - The Quietus

Grace And Danger: A Flannery O'Connor Retrospective - The Quietus | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Grace And Danger: A Flannery O'Connor Retrospective

The Quietus

 

Though her work only received a moderate following during her lifetime, her posthumously published Collected Stories won the National Book Award for fiction in 1971, she became the first post-war American female author in the Library of America, and an annual short fiction award bestowed from University of Georgia Press now bears her name. At the time of her death Elizabeth Bishop wrote “I am sure her few books will live on and on in American literature. They are narrow, possibly, but they are clear, hard, vivid, and full of bits of description, phrases, and an odd insight that contains more real poetry than a dozen books of poems.” Over the years Bishop has been proved right, with the resonance and influence of O’Connor’s stories still measurably palpable in popular culture to this day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Helicopters of History: 1980s Literary Flights with Fidel Castro | Sampsonia Way Magazine

Helicopters of History: 1980s Literary Flights with Fidel Castro | Sampsonia Way Magazine | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Literature written in exile is always more mysterious than literature written from within the homeland. Exiles write from a multifaceted state of isolation: they are removed from their homeland, from their own language, and from other exiles. This gives rise to a literature of empty spaces. The works, filled with a rather laughable sense of nostalgia, create unexpected bridges between what each exile experiences in his or her solitude.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A back-to-school reading list of classic literature - OUPblog (blog)

A back-to-school reading list of classic literature - OUPblog (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A back-to-school reading list of classic literature
OUPblog (blog)

 

With carefree summer winding to a close, we’ve pulled together some reading recommendations to put you in a studious mood. Check out these Oxford World’s Classics suggestions to get ready for another season of books and papers. Even if you’re no longer a student, there’s something on this list for every literary enthusiast

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A list with a twist: This is not a static list, but rather suggestions for "If you liked . . . try . . ."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Mafia Killer's Autobiography Malerba Outrages Sicilian Literary Award Judge - International Business Times UK

Mafia Killer's Autobiography Malerba Outrages Sicilian Literary Award Judge - International Business Times UK | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
International Business Times UK

Mafia Killer's Autobiography Malerba Outrages Sicilian Literary Award Judge

 

The autobiography of a jailed Mafia killer has been selected as finalist for a Sicilian literary award, prompting the resignation of a juror who claimed the choice offended the memory of the author's victims.

 

Literary critic Gaspare Agnello said that the decision to admit a book by cosa nostra affiliate Giuseppe Grassonelli to the final has soiled the name of the prize dedicated to Leonardo Sciascia, a late Sicilian writer who helped raise awareness on Mafia issues through his work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Weight of Words: New Course Tackles Writers' Impact on Black History - The Root

The Weight of Words: New Course Tackles Writers' Impact on Black History - The Root | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Weight of Words: New Course Tackles Writers' Impact on Black History
The Root

 

In an online course, professor James Basker is hoping to bring new attention to anti-slavery writings in order to show the profound impact of literature on society. 

 

Literature—regardless of how it is delivered, whether in song, sermon, novel, short story, poem or essay—has the unique ability to inform, to uplift, and to shape our opinions and worldviews.

 

At least that’s how James Basker, the Richard Gilder Professor of Literary History at Barnard College at Columbia University, sees it. It’s a crucial point and question in his new online master’s course Amazing Grace: How Writers Helped End Slavery.

more...
No comment yet.