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Who is the bestselling author no-one has seen? - BBC News

Who is the bestselling author no-one has seen? - BBC News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
For reclusive authors such as JD Salinger, shying away from publicity has never harmed book sales. Lucy Scholes peeks into a secretive literary phenomenon.

 

But what of the infamous literary recluses whose work sells like hot cakes? This month sees the release of Paul Thomas Anderson’s film adaptation of Thomas Pynchon’s novel Inherent Vice. Pynchon is famously reclusive – something of an oxymoron in itself – in fact, he’s probably America’s most famous living literary recluse. A title that, until his death in 2010, was held by J D Salinger, a man who hid himself away from his fans after the phenomenal success of his now cult classic The Catcher in the Rye.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

On Thomas Pynchon

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Jacqueline Woodson On Growing Up, Coming Out And Saying Hi To Strangers - WUNC

Jacqueline Woodson On Growing Up, Coming Out And Saying Hi To Strangers - WUNC | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When author Jacqueline Woodson was growing up in Greenville, S.C., in the '60s and '70s, she was keenly aware of segregation. "We knew our
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The 15 Best Novels by Black Authors in 2014 - The Root

These literary gems are the best books by writers representing the full range of the African Diaspora.
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5 Most Haunting Psychological Thrillers - ARY NEWS (press release) (blog)

5 Most Haunting Psychological Thrillers - ARY NEWS (press release) (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Here are five of the most haunting and touching psychological thrillers of Hollywood.

 

First choice of intelligent cine lovers, Psychological thriller is a fictional thriller story which emphasizes the psychology of its characters and their unstable emotional states.

 

According to director John Madden, psychological thrillers focus on story, character development, choice, and moral conflict; fear and anxiety drive the psychological tension in unpredictable ways.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

I've only seen 3 of these 5. Looks like a Netflix weekend coming up.

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Desperately Seeking Susan: HBO's Regarding Susan Sontag Traces the Life ... - Vogue.com

Desperately Seeking Susan: HBO's Regarding Susan Sontag Traces the Life ... - Vogue.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Susan Sontag was known as the ultimate postwar New York intellectual, but she climbed to that perch from outside.
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In 'The Death of Santini' Pat Conroy Turns From Fiction To Memoir - WBUR

In 'The Death of Santini' Pat Conroy Turns From Fiction To Memoir - WBUR | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Readers of Pat Conroy‘s novels “The Prince of Tides” and “The Great Santini” are very familiar with his troubled family history, in particular his harsh military father.


But last year, Pat decided to step out from behind the guise of fiction and write a memoir: “The Death of Santini: The Story of a Father and His Son,” which is out in paperback this month.

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Gone For Good: The Long Lost Works Of English Literature - Huffington Post

Gone For Good: The Long Lost Works Of English Literature - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

in some cases, a frustrating and tantalizing gap can appear in an author's back catalog when an existing work is lost or destroyed, either intentionally or accidentally, leaving us with little more than fragments or descriptions of its content. From ancient to modern, covering almost three millennia, the stories behind 10 of literature's most intriguing long-lost works are explored here.

 

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‘The Lodger’ evokes lit pioneer who mirrored a woman’s mind

Louisa Treger’s earnest, carefully researched first novel spotlights a neglected pioneer of 20th-century literature: Dorothy Richardson, who published one of the earliest examples of stream-of-consciousness fiction, “Pointed Roofs,” in 1915. Fellow modernist Virginia Woolf praised her for inventing “the psychological sentence of the feminine gender,” and the best passages in “The ­Lodger” show Richardson developing a distinctive prose style to mirror “the mind of a woman,” which is “deeper, more instinctive ... able to see many things simultaneously.”

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New 'lost' Ayn Rand novel will bring her crimes against literature to new generation of jerks - Raw Story

New 'lost' Ayn Rand novel will bring her crimes against literature to new generation of jerks - Raw Story | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Raw Story

 

For the first time in more than 50 years, publishers are rolling out a new novel by the godmother of libertarianism, the previously unpublished Ideal. The book tells the story of a movie actress who is accused of murder.

 

Rand wrote the novel in her late 20s, but never published it, although at one point, she did write a stage adaptation, which will be included in the new edition along with the short novel.

 

The “objectivist” author’s works — particularly the novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged — have been held up by pro-business, anti-government zealots as exemplars of political fiction. Her acolytes praise her as one of the greatest minds of the 20th century and have made her, essentially, the patron saint of people who don’t tip.

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A Weapon for Readers by Tim Parks

A Weapon for Readers by Tim Parks | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A pen is not a magic wand. The critical faculty is not conjured from nothing. But it was remarkable how many students improved their performance with this simple stratagem. There is something predatory, cruel even, about a pen suspended over a text. Like a hawk over a field, it is on the lookout for something vulnerable. Then it is a pleasure to swoop and skewer the victim with the nib’s sharp point. The mere fact of holding the hand poised for action changes our attitude to the text. We are no longer passive consumers of a monologue but active participants in a dialogue. Students would report that their reading slowed down when they had a pen in their hand, but at the same time the text became more dense, more interesting, if only because a certain pleasure could now be taken in their own response to the writing when they didn’t feel it was up to scratch, or worthy only of being scratched.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Tim Parks on how his suggestion that students hold a pen in hand as they read increased their interaction with and understanding of the text.

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Writing from the Ruins: An Unreliable History of Postmodern Literary Fiction

Writing from the Ruins: An Unreliable History of Postmodern Literary Fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Postmodern literature defies a simple, coherent definition. The beginning, middle, and end of the movement — just as the stories which it contains — cannot easily be marked. Rather than clearly designated points on a timeline, postmodern literature exists as a sort of blur somewhere between the modernist movement and contemporary literature. 

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Seven ways schools kill the love of reading in kids — and 4 principles to ... - Washington Post (blog)

Seven ways schools kill the love of reading in kids — and 4 principles to ... - Washington Post (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Why don’t more kids love (or even like) to read? This post by Alfie Kohn explains all the ways that school actually kills a desire to read in many kids, and how that can be remedied.  Alfie Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org), who gave me permission to republish this piece, is the author of 13 books, the most recent titled “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom About Children and Parenting.”  This piece first appeared in the Fall 2010 issue of English Journal, but it remains as true today as it did then, perhaps even more so with the advent of the Common Core State Standards. 

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Julianne Moore works to find the person inside the struggle - Los Angeles Times

Julianne Moore works to find the person inside the struggle - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

For most actors playing fictional characters, role research tends to consist of watching a few similar movies, maybe reading a book or two. To prepare for her latest part as a middle-aged woman hit with a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer's, Julianne Moore met with the head of the national Alzheimer's Association, underwent a battery of tests and hung out with scores of patients suffering from the condition.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Julianne Moore on her role of Alice Howland, a woman with early-onset Alzheimer's disease, in the film based on Lisa Genova's novel "Still Alice."

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The Great American Novel Buried in Norman Mailer's Letters - The New Yorker

The Great American Novel Buried in Norman Mailer's Letters - The New Yorker | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mailer may well be best remembered as an author of essays, but the novel was his touchstone. The letters show how he got sidetracked.

 

Most great writers are also great talkers, but writing begins where talking ends: in silence. Norman Mailer is one of literature’s great talkers, and his voice—his speaking voice—is crucial to his work. As a founding partner of a new upstart Greenwich Village weekly in the mid-nineteen-fifties, he even came up with its title: the Village Voice. Perhaps no writer of his time endured such keen conflict between his personal voice and his literary voice, and that conflict is at the center of “Selected Letters of Norman Mailer,” edited by J. Michael Lennon (who is also the author of a biography of Mailer, “A Double Life”).

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How James Patterson Became the Ultimate Storyteller - Vanity Fair

How James Patterson Became the Ultimate Storyteller - Vanity Fair | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Todd S. Purdum explores the contradictions of this one-man publishing conglomerate.

 

The planet’s best-selling author since 2001, James Patterson has more than 300 million copies of his books in print, an army of co-writers, several TV deals in the works, and an estimated income of $90 million last year alone. But where’s the respect? Exploring the contradictions of this one-man publishing conglomerate, Todd S. Purdum learns how Patterson’s childhood and advertising career made him the ultimate storyteller.

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Mary Kennedy on married couples in romance and mystery fiction - USA TODAY

Mary Kennedy on married couples in romance and mystery fiction - USA TODAY | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mary Kennedy, author of Nightmares Can Be Murder, explores why we love married couples in fiction.

 

Many current best-selling series revolve around a married couple. Does marriage add a whole new dimension to the plot? Is there an extra layer of emotional conflict when the marriage is threatened or turns rocky? Here's what I found.

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Unseen CS Lewis letter defines his notion of joy

Unseen CS Lewis letter defines his notion of joy | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Author of spiritual memoir Surprised By Joy tells correspondent that joy is ‘almost as unlike security or prosperity as it is unlike agony’ A letter from CS Lewis which was discovered inside a secondhand book sees the author writing of how “real...
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A meeting of two literary converts - Catholic Herald Online (blog)

A meeting of two literary converts - Catholic Herald Online (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Catholic Herald Online (blog)

A meeting of two literary converts

 

Muriel Spark found Catholicism practical and rational, while Edith Sitwell was receptive to the power of sacramental grace

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Liam Harte on Raymond Carver, Seamus Heaney and Edward Said - Irish Times

Liam Harte on Raymond Carver, Seamus Heaney and Edward Said - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The challenge of finding the words to match the thought is never-ending

 

What lessons have you learned about life from reading?


In a nutshell, what it means to be a human being, in all aspects, and what it feels like to experience the world through the consciousness of different human beings.

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Leave Stephen King alone: “Misery,” income inequality and the connection ... - Salon

Leave Stephen King alone: “Misery,” income inequality and the connection ... - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Jealousy and creativity are closely intertwined -- and horror master Stephen King is one great example

 

But there is also a sense in which creative jealousy could be beneficial – or at least necessary. Harold Bloom’s The Anxiety of Influence (1973) argues that there exists between outstanding writers of different generations a profound but fructifying jealousy. Great writers, according to Bloom, sense a strong relation to tradition and their forerunners’ works and engage in a strong misreading, or a creative reinterpretation – a killing and a superseding, as it were – of that original material. It’s a kind of literary Oedipus complex. Bloom describes it as ‘a profound act of reading that is a kind of falling in love with a literary work’. The greats – Shakespeare, for instance – ‘will not allow you to bury him, or escape him, or replace him . . . The largest truth of literary influence is that it is an irresistible anxiety’. The anxiety comes from not knowing whether you can be better than those great predecessors. Whether you agree with Bloom or not – and many writers would disagree, jealously guarding the idea of the unique imagination, the importance of their own development, or uncomfortable with the idea of labouring under this hierarchical canonising impulse – the theory is a powerful enunciation of the importance of jealousy in literary creation.

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Jenny Diski on Doris Lessing: ‘I was the cuckoo in the nest’

Jenny Diski on Doris Lessing: ‘I was the cuckoo in the nest’ | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Writer Jenny Diski was taken in by Doris Lessing in 1963 when she was a teenager, but the relationship soon soured. Now Diski, recently diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer, has finally decided to tell her side of the story

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Slow readers learn to savor every word - Tribune-Review

Slow readers learn to savor every word - Tribune-Review | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

In today's tech-obsessed world, the simple act of reading a book often loses out to the lure of the web, incessant cellphone alerts and never-ending social-media streams.


A new movement is aimed at stripping away all those distractions. The act of slow reading is inspiring clubs where people gather to simply sit in silence and relish the written word.


“I've been amazed at how popular the concept of Slow Reading Clubs has been,” says Meg Williams, director of Slow Reading Co., based in Wellington, New Zealand. Williams started the first club in August. About 30 people gather at a small, cozy bar to read each week.

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Sound Off: What book influenced you the most? - Florida Times-Union

The holiday season is when many books are given as gifts. We asked member of the Times-Union/Jacksonville.com Email Interactive Group which book, besides the Bible or other essential religious work, has had the most influence on them and why? 

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Warren Motte Watches Literary Characters As They Watch Themselves - KGOU

Warren Motte Watches Literary Characters As They Watch Themselves - KGOU | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

When University of Colorado professor and French literature critic Warren Motte was a graduate student around 35 years ago, he noticed that he kept coming across scenes of people looking at themselves in mirrors in different works of literature.


“I started collecting these scenes, kind of as an antidote to the dissertation that I was writing at the time,” Motte says. “I collected these in my reading over the years and finally I ended up with somewhere between 12,000 and 15,000 of them.”


What interested Motte most was the gaze itself, and the fact that through literature, he was able to see these characters see themselves.

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Jonathan Yardley's favorite books - Washington Post

Jonathan Yardley's favorite books - Washington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

As longtime Washington Post book critic Jonathan Yardley retires this week, he lists some of the books he’s cherished most during his 33-year tenure with Book World. Some of the titles here he reviewed for The Post, and others he read for the first time over those years.

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