Literature & Psychology
10.8K views | +0 today
Literature & Psychology
interdisciplinary explorations
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Borges lectures reveal author's literary sensibilities - New York Daily News (blog)

Borges lectures reveal author's literary sensibilities - New York Daily News (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Borges lectures reveal author's literary sensibilities
New York Daily News (blog)

 

In “The Library of Babel,” Jorge Luis Borges imagines the universe as a library containing an infinite number of identical, hexagonal rooms. One of these rooms houses a book that offers “the formula and perfect compendium of all the rest,” and some of the inhabitants of this world believe in a godlike librarian who has access to it.

 

The Argentine writer demonstrates a likeness to his fictional librarian in “Professor Borges,” a compilation of transcriptions of lectures he delivered at the University of Buenos Aires in 1966. As a professor of English and North American literature, Borges offered a survey of English literature that indexes the poems, novels, and nonfiction he found most important. In a course that begins with “Beowulf” and ends with Robert Louis Stevenson, the erudite “Ficciones” author takes his students on an unconventional journey that spans 25 sessions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The making of Holly Golightly - Telegraph.co.uk

The making of Holly Golightly - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk

The making of Holly Golightly

 

The spirited heroine of Truman Capote’s most famous book is a bewitching blend of many different characters, including the author’s own, writes Jay McInerney

. . .

There were any number of New York party girls and society fixtures who claimed to be the real-life model for Holly, but, as Capote’s biographer Gerald Clarke remarked, “the one Holly most resembles, in spirit if not in body, is her creator”. Like Holly Golightly, Truman Capote invented himself pretty much from scratch, and became the toast of a town that celebrates the moment, and doesn’t give much of a damn about the past – about origins or ancestry or even the events of last week.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Memories are made of this - The Guardian

Memories are made of this - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian

Memories are made of this

 

Memory and disruptions to it have provided a surprising amount of fodder for science fiction and other pop culture, but it's often distorted or portrayed in ways which don't match what the science tells us. In an attempt to rectify this, and as someone who did his PhD in memory processing, what follows is a brief guide to the workings of human memory. And please be aware that there are probably other neuroscientists and psychologists out there who would take issue with parts/all of this. This is just how I learned things.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

17 Most Screwed Up Relationships In Books - Huffington Post

17 Most Screwed Up Relationships In Books - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
17 Most Screwed Up Relationships In Books
Huffington Post

 

From Oedipus and Jocasta to Anastasia and Christian Grey, here are the most dysfunctional book couples. Trust us, these people will make you feel good about your worst relationship.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

What about those kids from "Flowers in the Attic"?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Under The Dome is Under the Bar - Patheos (blog)

Under The Dome is Under the Bar - Patheos (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Patheos (blog)
Under The Dome is Under the Bar

 

The other potentially high-quality aspect about this show is the sheer number of characters involved.  I wrote 2 research papers on Stephen King’s novel Needful Things while in high school, and one thing I discovered in that process is that King is able to juggle an enormously large number of characters, and he makes them seem not only essential to the development of the story, but he also allows a level of character development, nearly unheard of for minor characters in literature.  There are thousands of possible outcomes for the inhabitants of Chester’s Mill, based solely on the fact that there are so many characters and personalities at work that the show focuses on.  The potential for greatness is certainly there.

 

But after having watched the entire Battlestar Galactica series for the first time earlier this year, after having been immersed in Breaking Bad, and after failing to really engage with any CBS drama since CSI: Miami went off the air a few years ago (admit it, you secretly loved it, too), I find Under The Dome too familiar.  I feel like I’ve been to Chester’s Mill before, and one visit was enough.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

I haven't read Stephen King's novel, but I've had some of the same reactions to the TV show.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Timothy Dalton Joins Penny Dreadful At Showtime - Cinema Blend

Timothy Dalton Joins Penny Dreadful At Showtime - Cinema Blend | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Timothy Dalton Joins Penny Dreadful At Showtime
Cinema Blend

 

License to Kill actor Timothy Dalton hasn’t had a big TV gig since he popped up on Chuck several seasons ago. Whether by choice or circumstance, he hasn’t worked nearly as frequently in recent years (unless you count Toy Story stuff), but that’s all about to change. He just found a new project in Showtime’s new series, Penny Dreadful, which is headed to the subscription cable network sometime in 2014.

Penny Dreadful’s title stems from a type of British fiction published in the 19th century that often featured horror tropes. Accordingly, the network is describing the series as a “frightening psychological thriller” that will fittingly be set in Victorian London. The series will reimagine London as a place filled with some of the most horrific and fanciful characters from literature in the time period, including Oscar Wilde’s Dorian Gray, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and more.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Murder for young readers - Boston Globe

Murder for young readers - Boston Globe | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Murder for young readers
Boston Globe

 

But in a new book, “Bloody Murder: The Homicide Tradition in Children’s Literature,” Michelle Ann Abate reveals that violence has always played a central role in children’s books—from actual fairy tales up to high school reading lists today. In short, it’s not just adults, with their true crime books and endless reruns of “Law & Order,” who are hooked on homicide. As Abate writes, “the American obsession with murder also permeates its literature for children.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

'Bone Season' author suggests 5 other books of dark futures - Today.com

'Bone Season' author suggests 5 other books of dark futures - Today.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
'Bone Season' author suggests 5 other books of dark futures

Today.com

 

Characters like Lucy Snowe from Charlotte Bronte’s “Villette” helped her forge a path for Paige Mahoney, the female protagonist of “The Bone Season.”

 

“Lucy is a fascinating character,” said Shannon. “She's very enigmatic and somewhat passive on the surface, but she faces a great deal of psychological pain. The way Bronte handles Lucy, wrapping the character in a kind of emotional façade, is something I'd like to emulate with Paige.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Plath Edits Book of Essays on Raymond Carver - Illinois Wesleyan University

Plath Edits Book of Essays on Raymond Carver - Illinois Wesleyan University | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Plath Edits Book of Essays on Raymond Carver

Illinois Wesleyan University

 

Plath’s new book Critical Insights: Raymond Carver (Salem Press, 2013) is a collection of 13 essays summarizing the short story master’s unique place in American literature and examining the major issues surrounding Carver criticism. Although he was also a poet, essayist and playwright, Carver is best known for his short fiction that consistently reflected his own hardscrabble, blue-collar life. His work often focused on ordinary people living everyday lives on the margins of society. Six of Carver’s stories won the O. Henry Prize given annually for the best North American short fiction.

 

Critics in Carver’s time insisted on calling his literary style “minimalism,” a style short on adverbs and long on oblique hints and even innuendo. Carver resented the term, feeling it diminished his work, said Plath, who also wrote the book’s introduction and contributed two essays

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Girls on Film: The confounding problems of fan fiction

Girls on Film: The confounding problems of fan fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The disappointing new film The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones was derived from a piece of Harry Potter fan fiction. That's not a good thing.

 

 

To be fair, fan fiction is neither a new invention nor an inherently questionable one. The term "fan fiction" gained popularity along with the rise of the internet, but a version of "fan fiction" has been the driving force behind the evolution of centuries-old stories, which were told, retold, and expanded by a wide range of storytellers — resulting in some of the most beloved stories in history. The practice has created classics like West Side Story (based on Romeo and Juliet, a story that didn't originate with Shakespeare anyway). Disney used a version of fan fiction to change grotesque fairy tales into family-friendly animated musicals. Aspiring television writers show off their chops by writing "spec scripts" for their favorite series. And fans write these stories as a means to let their beloved series continue for years after their official entries have concluded — even if the practice angers writers like Anne Rice, Orson Scott Card, and Ursula K. LeGuin.

 

But fan fiction has suddenly become the new big business — a way for fans (and publishers) to capitalize on a recently established writer's world and hope to ride the same waves of success.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

How archetypal stories become fan fiction

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Author's story collection full of magical talent - Technique

Author's story collection full of magical talent - Technique | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Technique
Author's story collection full of magical talent

 

[Karen] Russell’s stories are quirky in the best way. She twists standard tropes or archetypes and presents them in thought-provoking or hilarious situations (or both). To wit, the story “The Barn at the End of Our Term” depicts American presidents reincarnated as horses in the same barn. The story follows Rutherford B. Hayes, and the other equine Commander-in-Chiefs such as Dwight Eisenhower, as they attempt to figure out if they are in heaven, hell or even the U Part political satire. As the horses grant themselves such positions as “Spokehorse of the Western Territories,” the short story also manages to be a tale on handling death. Hayes tragically believes his wife is trapped in the body of a sheep on the farm in the same vein he is trapped as a horse. He trains the sheep to follow him with carrots, leading to funny and depressing moments of him realizing he is alone.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at "Swamplandia!" author Karen Russell’s short story collection "Vampires in the Lemon Grove"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Poetic dissection of childhood - The Age

The Age
Poetic dissection of childhood

 

Wish is really about the physical nature of language and the boundaries that communication both creates and dissolves. Of course, it is a sophisticated version of the science fiction that Goldsworthy loved as a young person and which he describes in His Stupid Boyhood. Yet the book's fascination with language is closer to Goldsworthy's mature poetic interests. James Bradley writes in an excellent new introduction that ''language, the novel suggests, is both liberating and confining, a creation capable not only of communicating but of isolating''.

 
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

About the novel "His Stupid Boyhood" and other writings by Australian physician Peter Goldsworthy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Best of British: Five iconic food moments in literature - The Independent

Best of British: Five iconic food moments in literature - The Independent | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Independent
Best of British: Five iconic food moments in literature

 

British authors know how to pen culinary delights. And while some of Britain’s literary greats bring food to life on their pages to get our taste buds tingling, others have equally repulsed through their gruesome narratives.

 

From writers of canonical prestige, to the classics of our childhood, appetizing and iconic literary food moments are at the forefront of many of our best books. Here is a selection of some of the tastiest:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Robertson Davies: erudite and entertaining - Telegraph.co.uk

Robertson Davies: erudite and entertaining - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Telegraph.co.uk
Robertson Davies: erudite and entertaining

 

His books were erudite and wise, almost philosophical meditations on the business of living, but they were also witty and whimsical, full of oddball characters. The man who won the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour said: "Comedy is fully as revealing in its probing of human problems as is tragedy. The thing about comedy that I greatly value is that it is infinitely harder to fake than tragedy."

 

His books (30 in all) often deliberately rambled, touching on magic, medicine, Jungian analysis, murder, art forgery and funeral parlours – and anything else that struck his remarkable imagination.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An appreciation of the British/Canadian author on the 100th anniversary of his birth

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

New Exhibit Explains Why We've Been Fascinated By Witches For More Than 500 Years - Huffington Post

New Exhibit Explains Why We've Been Fascinated By Witches For More Than 500 Years - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
New Exhibit Explains Why We've Been Fascinated By Witches For More Than ...

 

Before vampires swooped into popular culture and satiated our appetite for sexualized supernatural characters, there was a time when witches, witchcraft and general feminine maleficium held a prominent place in our hearts.

 

Our collective obsession with witches has been exaggerated over the years thanks to the literature, film and television shows that gave us the Weird Sisters, the Wicked Witch of the West and Sabrina the Teenage Witch. Whether we feared them, envied them or were utterly enchanted by them, witches held the attention of readers and cinephiles for as long as the media existed.

. . .

A new exhibit at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, aptly titled exhibition, "Witches & Wicked Bodies," is paying homage to art's heated affair with witches. The show dives into darker depictions of witches hidden in prints, drawings, paintings, sculptures and more, shedding light on attitudes perpetuated by everyone from Francisco de Goya to Paula Rego.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Lots of good illustrative art works

more...
Persephone Hades's curator insight, August 27, 2013 4:36 PM

Why the fascination? I find it is so interesting as the working of the witch/nature is so normal.

Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Does anyone read hyperfiction? - artsHub Australia (subscription)

Does anyone read hyperfiction? - artsHub Australia (subscription) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Does anyone read hyperfiction?

artsHub Australia (subscription)

 

But with the adoption of eTablets over dedicated technologically limited eReaders, the landscape has changed. An eTablet is a multi-functional device that supports a wide range of media. It is now possible for a publication to offer multimedia add-ons or branched organisation, where the reader gets to select a pathway in a kind of choose-your own adventure. A click can take you to an illustrative video, a sound-clip or a different narrative line.

 

Does this mean it’s finally time for hyperfiction?


Not necessarily. While eTablets can give us all sorts of additional functions in practice they have so far largely continued the trend of print book replication; and most consumers seem content with this traditional experience.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Cult TV: Three Shows You Should Be Watching - PopMatters

Cult TV: Three Shows You Should Be Watching - PopMatters | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Cult TV: Three Shows You Should Be Watching
PopMatters

 

American television has colonised the world’s unconscious. Television shows from other countries, however, can sometimes break through to the surface. We’ve decided to highlight three recent examples. Each is distinctive in their own right and have deservedly attracted cult followings. They are all readily available in one form or another. Consider watching these true originals before American remakes completely ruin them or force them back into hiding underground. 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Lest we Americans get too complacent about our "Mad Men" and "Breaking Bad" . . .

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A Breaking Bad (and Beyond) Reading List - The Millions

A Breaking Bad (and Beyond) Reading List - The Millions | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A Breaking Bad (and Beyond) Reading List
The Millions

 

One of the strengths of Breaking Bad is its richly layered storylines. There are worlds and worlds behind Walter White’s character arc. The story of the land and people of Northern New Mexico alone could be its own fascinating spinoff of Breaking Bad. Not to mention the history of The Drug War, cartels, and race relations in the borderlands.

 

The books on this list range from the personal to the mythological to the journalistic, and some intertwine all three. They all depict a world of stark contrasts. There is danger here. There are hardscrabble heroes and self-made gods dripping with hubris. Each book is infused with the poetry of landscape, in which humans like Walter White and Jesse Pinkman try to craft their own story with what their realities have handed them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Alice Hoffman 's latest work took her in a different direction - Boston Globe

Alice Hoffman 's latest work took her in a different direction - Boston Globe | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Boston Globe
Alice Hoffman 's latest work took her in a different direction

 

In a career spanning three decades, Alice Hoffman has published more than two dozen novels for adults and teens, many of which are suffused with magic. Now, years after her last treatment for breast cancer, she has written “Survival Lessons,” her first work of nonfiction, recounting what she has learned about life through enduring serious illness.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Herman Melville, great American reader - Salon

Herman Melville, great American reader - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Salon
Herman Melville, great American reader

 

IN THE GENERAL RARE BOOKS COLLECTION at Princeton University Library sits a stunning two-volume edition of John Milton that once belonged to Herman Melville. Melville’s tremendous debt to Milton — and to Homer, Virgil, the Bible, and Shakespeare — might be evident to anyone who has wrestled with the moral and intellectual complexity that lends Moby Dick its immortal heft, but to see Melville’s marginalia in his 1836 Poetical Works of John Milton is to understand just how intimately the author of the great American novel engaged with the author of the greatest poem in English. Checkmarks, underscores, annotations, and Xs reveal the passages in Paradise Lost and other poems that would have such a determining effect on Melville’s own work.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

The Library Foundation of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Public Library are launching a month-long celebration of Moby Dick, a way to encourage readers “to discover or rediscover the great literary masterpiece, Moby Dick, through the lens of the modern and equally mythical Southern California state of mind.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Angus Wilson: From darling to dodo - The Guardian

Angus Wilson: From darling to dodo - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian

Angus Wilson: From darling to dodo

 

Angus Wilson was once celebrated for his clear-eyed interrogations of moral behaviour and fretful liberalism, so how did he end up penniless in a French apartment block? DJ Taylor on a cautionary tale of a writer who lost touch with his time

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Rachel Trezise and Will Self join other writers in praise of the short story - WalesOnline

Rachel Trezise and Will Self join other writers in praise of the short story - WalesOnline | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Rachel Trezise and Will Self join other writers in praise of the short story WalesOnline

 

Tessa Hadley


Human beings think in short story shapes. The  short story comes naturally to us. A joke, or a  scrap of news, or a bit of gossip – all these are  short stories in embryo. So it’s surprising that  even passionate readers are sometimes wary of  the short form. Perhaps reading short stories is  more strenuous than reading a long novel –  because you have to keep starting over again,  plunging with each new beginning into a new  place with a new set of rules. But that  strenuousness is the joy of the form too.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Paris Review – Nabokov on Joyce, Sadie Stein

Paris Review – Nabokov on Joyce, Sadie Stein | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Splendid: Nabokov showing how data viz is often the best kind of literary criticism

 

Of teaching Ulysses, Vladimir Nabokov wrote, “Instead of perpetuating the pretentious nonsense of Homeric, chromatic, and visceral chapter headings, instructors should prepare maps of Dublin with Bloom’s and Stephen’s intertwining itineraries clearly traced.” Below is his.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Author book tours aren't what they used to be - Chicago Sun-Times

Author book tours aren't what they used to be - Chicago Sun-Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Author book tours aren't what they used to be
Chicago Sun-Times
I

 

authors still make in-person appearances. Readers still want autographed books. It’s the nature of their interactions, and where they take place, that has changed.

 

A virtual tour — in which an author makes pre-planned “stops” in the blogosphere through live chats, guest posts, and Q&A sessions on various websites — is one popular and inexpensive method for attracting readers.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at how the current publishing reality has affected the ways in which authors and readers interact.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Story About the Story II - Willamette Week

The Story About the Story II - Willamette Week | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Willamette Week

The Story About the Story II

 

To counteract the joyless misreadings and picking of scabs that have become today’s literary criticism, Hallman is collecting writing about books that is every bit as personal, humane and emotionally rich as the books themselves. Zadie Smith’s essay about reluctantly allowing herself to love Zora Neale Hurston—allowing herself to even acknowledge something like the “black experience”—is affecting enough it brought (manly, stoic) tears to my eyes even though I’d already read the essay in her 2009 book, Changing My Mind. Seattle writer David Shields’ appreciation of Bill Murray, “The Only Solution to the Soul Is the Senses,” is as tragic as it is funny. And Martin Amis’ obituary for the great misanthropic poet Philip Larkin is a classic of the form, an ode to a death that was “as comfortless as the life.”

 

more...
No comment yet.