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Using Technology to Preserve Indonesia's Literary History - Jakarta Globe

Using Technology to Preserve Indonesia's Literary History - Jakarta Globe | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Jakarta Globe Using Technology to Preserve Indonesia's Literary History

 

“Indonesia has a rich culture, which is at risk of being forgotten. It’s therefore critical that we document as much as we can to preserve this rich culture. Literature is one means of doing that. In part, it’s also the confidence to show to a broader audience Indonesia’s rich culture. So little of Indonesian literature has been translated and I am proud to be part of an organization which has for the past 25 years [worked] on making Indonesia’s literature accessible to everybody.”

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Teach the Books, Touch the Heart

Teach the Books, Touch the Heart | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Teaching English simply for test preparation rather than to develop a love of literature is a mistake.

 

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Call it serendiptiy. Call it Irony. I dunno. I've had this article open in my browser for days while I've been busy struggling to figure out how to measure the impact that the Google Lit Trips project has on engaging students in literary reading so that I can better position the project to be attractive to philanthropic funding sources. 

 

This article's author nails the dilemma. Current assessment structure do NOT address the important data, because the true value of literary reading can not be reduced to selecting a "correct answer" on a multiple choice question.  Current assessment structures as Sir Ken Robinson has pointed out, "...have a tendency to make the measurable important versus the important measurable."

 

Like many of my literary loving colleagues, I am concerned about the Common Core Standards' 50% devaluation of literary reading. Though, I support increased attention to informational reading.

 

But to pit one important set of reading skills against another seems more than counter productive; it may well have destructive, perhaps devastating impact on one of humankind's longest lasting and most universally cherished modes of passing wisdom from one generation to the next; that of storytelling.

 

From Aesop's Fables to biblical parables; from Zuess to Dr. Seuss, the greatest truths of the human condition have been passed through the generations of every culture since the beginning of time via the ENGAGING power of FICTION. 

 

However, unlike many of my literary loving colleagues, I am not opposed to the desire to hold both students and educators accountable. Truth be told, I was taught to hate Shakespeare before I was taught to love Shakespeare. In retrospect I realize that at times I was a bit more of a challenge to reach than other students and that I certainly could have done more to improve my receptiveness to what I had not previously been receptive to. But, there were teachers who worked much more effectively with "that me" than others who in too many cases assumed that expressing scorn and disappointment was an effective mode of opening my eyes, my mind, and...if they cared, my heart. Looking back, though admittedly I was a large part of the problem, I realize that too many of my teachers had much to learn about learning. 

 

Neither do I object to funders expecting to see results from their philanthropic generosity. 

 

The question is how do we who teach the great questions through fiction assess our effectiveness? This article articulates the dilemma fairly effectively. though the author's proposed solutions seem as "unviable" as they have always proven to be. 

 

Much of our current data driven assessment structures do not measure what we hope to accomplish through literary reading. And much of those structures, well-intended as they may be, not only measures the measurable but less important, but in not measuring the truly important, misdirect student learning and teacher efforts away from the actual values of literary reading.

 

My concern?

 

How CAN we measure the truly valuable aspects of literary reading? If we who love literature do not help meet the need for quality assessment and accountability, then perhaps, as I once learned through literary reading, we are as guilty as Nero.

 

And for those of you who may not remember the details of Nero's choice to fiddle while Rome was burning (IF the story is even true) might find it ironic that Nero apparently was more interested in promoting culture than taking care of business.

 

Are we fiddling while Rome is burning?

 

 Perhaps we ought to be figuring out ways to truly measure the IMPORTANT value of literary reading before there are only the ashes of literary reading left in the curriculum.

 

Dare I ask if complaining about the status quo of assessment needs is merely fiddling?

 

Can we do better at helping those who need to know whether literary reading education is valuable or effective, find a better way to measure that value or effectiveness?

 

 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Runa Svetlikova
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Bringing 'unfilmable' books to the screen - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Bringing 'unfilmable' books to the screen - Minneapolis Star Tribune | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Minneapolis Star Tribune Bringing 'unfilmable' books to the screen

 

Movies operate with different ground rules than literature, says Stillwater screenwriter Shawn Lawrence Otto. "Most novels move the plot forward, then dive back into character and reflections. In movies it's always action moving the plot first."

 

Readers will grant an author more latitude to create his imaginary world than viewers will give a filmmaker. Otto held that axiom in mind as he wrote the script for "House of Sand and Fog" starring Ben Kingsley and Jennifer Connelly as morally compromised foes whose financial struggle turns tragic. Otto recast the nihilistic ending of the novel by Andre Dubus III, saying it "wouldn't have worked in a movie," and instead offering hope of redemption for Connelly's character.

 

"When I see an adaptation that solves problems in the novel, I am inspired and filled with admiration, because I know how hard it is," Otto says. "They're telling a parallel story. Dancing around the novel and doing it in a beautiful way. That's a remarkable thing to see."

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Inspecting The Trend Of Autistic-Spectrum Characters : NPR

Inspecting The Trend Of Autistic-Spectrum Characters : NPR | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
As diagnoses of autism have risen, so too have autistic characters in literature. Tasha Robinson explains how an "intelligent outsider's view of humanity" has led to a growing number of autistic characters in young adult fiction.

 

Since Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time became a worldwide best-seller in 2003, there has been a rising wave of novels like Colin Fischer, written from autistic characters' perspectives or closely focused on their worldviews. Some of the boom can be attributed to increasing public curiosity about autism: As autism diagnoses have risen, more funding and research have been devoted to its causes, and public awareness of autism-spectrum conditions like Asperger's syndrome has increased dramatically. The mysteries behind autism make it an evocative topic — and ambiguity leaves room for writers to romanticize, theorize or appropriate at will.

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'Twilight' Is Not Simply a Pro-Life Fantasy

'Twilight' Is Not Simply a Pro-Life Fantasy | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
It understands that childbirth is scary and dangerous, transformative and worthwhile.

 

In particular, I think it's false, to my own experience at least, to deny that there is something transformative about bringing children into this world. As a father, my son is just about the most important thing that's ever happened to me. I wouldn't say that he's made me "more beautiful, stronger, more sexual" than I'd ever been as a human (and I doubt my wife would say that he'd made her any of those things either)...but still. It's a pretty fucking big deal. Bella's transformation from human to vampire is in part a metaphor for her transition from woman to mother—a transition accomplished in fear, pain, terror, and love. And while I can't speak to that in terms of women changing to mothers, I can testify that, as a metaphor for the transition from man to father, it has a certain emotional veracity.

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Second readings - Financial Times

Second readings Financial Times: On "Artful" by Ali Smith

 

Originally delivered as a series of lectures by Smith at St Anne’s College, Oxford, Artful is structured around a fictional conceit that – as the title might suggest – is both stylish and a little tricksy. The writer, we learn, has died, leaving behind her notes for a series of lectures on literature: “On time”, “On form”, “On edge”, and “On offer and on reflection”. Her bereft lover – the narrator of this work – finds these notes as she is attempting to piece her own life together a year after her lover’s death; the narrative of Artful, then, alternates segments of the lectures with the more immediate, visceral observations of the narrator. The result is a moving dialogue between people and genres. (“It was like we were reading the same book,” the narrator writes of her sense of communion with her lover, via the notes, “like you were just ahead of me in the reading.”)

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Stacked: Some thoughts on "new adult" and also "cross-unders"

Stacked: Some thoughts on "new adult" and also "cross-unders" | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Why "new adult" and "grown-up YA" literature aren't a distinct genre

 

There is not a NA market. There is an adult market, and there is a YA market. There is nothing in between them.

 

I'm not entirely sure why there is such stigma attached to these books becoming part of the adult market. I think it's a huge and welcome addition to the adult fictional landscape, especially since there are books out there currently and books that have been around for quite a while that tap into the 19-30ish world and voice. These books tackle adult challenges and do so with an adult perspective. Being an adult is such a long, varied, and challenging period of time, and it's one that is so different for every single individual. Whereas YA novels have some unifying themes to them -- growing up, discovering who you are, earning an education, dealing with adults who still exert control over you in a myriad of ways -- adult novels do not. This is why there are so many genres and why there are so many appeal factors. One of those is going to be voice, and one of them is going to be age/experience/perspective of the main characters. Books featuring emerging adults? They have appeal factors for many readers who identify with this period of life. The same can be said about books that tackle middle age romances, books that explore what the end of life might be like, and so forth. But those books aren't categorized as "middle adult" or "geriatric fiction."

 

They're adult fiction.

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Barry Eisler on self-publishing and the politics of liberty - Washington Times

Barry Eisler on self-publishing and the politics of liberty - Washington Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Washington Times Barry Eisler on self-publishing and the politics of liberty

 

Eisler on his political philosophy:

Mostly it's about the rule of law and adherence to the Constitution, topics to which everyone pays lip service but which are increasingly misunderstood among Americans. People don't know, for example, that the president isn't "our" Commander In Chief -- not unless "we" are active duty military. Or that the president can't just have people killed on his say-so -- not as long as we have the Fifth Amendment, which forbids the deprivation of life, liberty, or property without due process of law. Or that the government can't torture people or otherwise break the law because they believe torture "works."

 

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Sara Maitland's top 10 books of the forest - The Guardian

Sara Maitland's top 10 books of the forest - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian Sara Maitland's top 10 books of the forest

 

About four years ago I realised that ancient woodland gives me the same frisson of terror and delight that traditional fairy stories do. A remarkable number of people seem to share this feeling. I wanted to work out what was going on, so I went into the woods and revisited the old fairytales – especially those by the Brothers Grimm. And what became clear to me was that the stories were imaginatively rooted in our northern-European origins as people of the forest.

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Molly Ringwald: from actress to novelist - KansasCity.com

Molly Ringwald's "When It Happens to You" is a series of interconnected stories, each narrated by a different character:

 

Ringwald says her acting experience was helpful in creating that singularity of voices.

 

"I think it definitely made it easier," Ringwald says via telephone from her home in Los Angeles. "It was the same thing that interested me the most about acting - the opportunity to get inside different people's heads. I'm surprised there aren't more actors who write fiction, because our job helps us train us for it. But there's this whole other part you have to learn which is incredibly hard and achingly solitary, and most actors, myself included, have always been used to collaborating with other people and the immediate response of an audience. When you're writing, you're sitting there by yourself and putting things together brick by brick, and it's hard . But to hear different voices in your head and knowing when they sound authentic is helpful."

 

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Truth, Beauty, Freedom, and Books: The Definitive Version

What about books like Dracula, or Sherlock Holmes, two of the most adapted novels/characters in literature AND cinema, not to mention plays?

 

Have you ever come across an adaptation that overshadowed the original work? What do you think makes something a "definitive version"?

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YA Fiction and the Many Possibilities of Manhood | Malinda Lo

YA Fiction and the Many Possibilities of Manhood | Malinda Lo | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Although Mesle's essay purports to be interrogating the changing nature of manhood as expressed in contemporary YA fiction, it also slips very easily into the mainstream discourse on YA, which is much more about adult ...

 

Today’s boys — in the real world and in YA novels — are coming of age in a world in which they thankfully have the option to be more than only one kind of man. I’m going to bet that even in the nineteenth century, not all boys wanted to grow up to become “moral, leading men” — nor could they. Morality and leadership were constrained by race and class.

 

I know that many people find the idea of a world in which gender is flexible to be frightening. It does indeed destabilize a lot of things that we may have been taught when we grew up. In a world with so much change going on — environmentally, politically, culturally — I’m not surprised that many people might be nostalgic for a vanished past of strong men who became honorable leaders. I just hope that people can remember that this vanished past was largely mythical, and it was firmly based on inequality.

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Singapore books its place - The Nation

Singapore books its place - The Nation | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Singapore books its place The Nation Discussions about heritage and freedom enliven the Singapore Writers Festival...

 

With this year's curatorial theme of Origins, the Singapore Writers Festival celebrated the originality of literary works and the beginning of time, of language, of the story, of "our" identities, themselves a favourite subject explored by Singaporean authors in an attempt to define their own identity.

 

This year, the festival explored storytelling, biographies and historical fiction and the source of creative inspiration through a long line-up of special guests including Pulitzer Prize-winner Michael Cunningham from the US, children's writer and illustrator Jimmy Liao from Taiwan and socio-political commentator Marina Mahathir from Malaysia.

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Nature, environment and a sense of place in fiction

Nature, environment and a sense of place in fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

To literary critic Scott Russell Sanders contemporary fiction "seems barren in part because it draws such tiny, cautious circles, in part because it pretends that nothing lies behind its timid boundaries. Such fiction treats some 'little human morality play' as the whole of reality and never turns outward to acknowledge the 'wilderness raging round.'" When we enter a new novel, Sanders says, we generally enter a room––a kitchen, bedroom, barroom, office––where characters talk. Absent, as much by innocent oversight as by choice, are the non-human contexts acting as forces on the events in the rooms. However "realistic" such fiction pretends to be, it is, Sanders says, "profoundly false, and therefore pathological." (See Michigan Quarterly Review, Fall, 1987).

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Gender facts in fiction - The Nation

Gender facts in fiction - The Nation | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Gender facts in fiction The Nation Indonesia's SEA Write laureate Oka Rusmini champions feminist cause...

 

For restless Balinese writer Oka Rusmini, the fight for feminism is far from over. "Many people think that in Indonesia, feminism has succeeded in the form of texts and theories," Rusmini says. "But for as long as some women are still being discriminated against by their societies, cultures and religions, gender equality has not been established yet - not here, not anywhere."

 

And that is the reason she writes.

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Joseph Campbell and the Jungian Reading of Myth

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Joseph Campbell and the Jungian Reading of Myth | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Review of Ritske Rensma, The Innateness of Myth: A New Interpretation of Joseph Campbell's Reception of C. G. Jung

 

The benefits from reading this book are manifold to different readers. First, as the author suggests for the academic studies of Campbell's ideas, the book may open the road to a better understanding of Campbell whose ideas changed in time. Secondly, Jungian scholarship may benefit by seeing in Campbell one of the most important popularizers of Jung's ideas and a continuity of Jung's work. Religious Studies, a department in which Campbell is taught, may benefit as well from the findings in this book, as well as recent evolutionary approaches to the study of religion and even the research into New Age, which may resonate with some of Jung's work.

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Harrowing story of an African farm - Mail & Guardian Online

Harrowing story of an African farm - Mail & Guardian Online | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Harrowing story of an African farm Mail & Guardian Online

 

South African literature has a long tradition of farm novels, ranging from Olive Schreiner to Marlene van Niekerk by way of many others and the best of them go far beyond extolling the lyric loveliness of the (always contested) landscape and the rural life, digging deep into the lives of people on these farms.

 

Alistair Morgan's novel does likewise and he combines this with a psychological study, which in his title clearly foregrounds the inner landscape of the mind.

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Dial L for Literature: The History of Hitchcock in 9 Book-Based ...

Dial L for Literature: The History of Hitchcock in 9 Book-Based ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
WordandFilm.com: Throughout his storied career, Alfred Hitchcock often found inspiration on the page -- and we're celebrating by looking back at Hitchcock's literatarily steeped past.

 

Throughout his storied career, Alfred Hitchcock often found inspiration on the page. He so enjoyed the works of British author Daphne Du Maurier, he based three of his films on two of her novels (“Jamaica Inn” and “Rebecca”) and one short story (“The Birds”). Now the film “Hitchcock,” out November 23, takes us behind the scenes of a game-changer for the legendary director. Based on Stephen Rebello’s book, Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho, it shows the master of suspense at a time when he had a vision others didn’t understand until the watershed final print. . . . In honor of “Hitchcock,” starring Anthony Hopkins and Helen Mirren, here’s a sampling of other Hitchcock films with a literary past (may contain spoilers).

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Tammara Webber on “New Adult” lit | The Book Case

Tammara Webber on “New Adult” lit | The Book Case | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Easy is part of an emerging subgenre called “New Adult” literature. NA books are appropriate for older teens and adults, and they typically feature characters who are transitioning from teendom to adulthood.

 

I’m not convinced publishing needs a new category. Heck yeah, I slapped a “New Adult” tag on each of my “Mature YA” books, because I’m not stupid. If everyone is going to say I’m writing “NA,” and that tag helps readers find my books, then by all means, I’ll add it. But what needed to happen has happened: Authors are writing and selling novels with characters in the college age range, without benefit of a distinct category.

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In Uyo, writers beam light on security, social media, literature - The Guardian Nigeria

In Uyo, writers beam light on security, social media, literature - The Guardian Nigeria | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In Uyo, writers beam light on security, social media, literature The Guardian Nigeria

 

“I am saying that a thousand, two thousand years from now, a future civilization will look beyond the archives constituted by disciplinary history and privilege the truths secured by Nigerian fiction today as a window into how we negotiated our march towards the mountaintop, the roads taken and the road not taken (apologies to Robert Frost), how we lived, laughed, loved, and hated. How we kidnapped. How we bombed. How we killed. How we pogromed. If, as it is tempting to predict, given our talent for self-inflicted national injuries, we somehow never make it to the mountaintop, we need not worry. Our literature will secure that failure against forgetting.

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Math and reading can be done unconsciously new research shows - Examiner.com

Eureka! Science News Math and reading can be done unconsciously new research shows

 

Researchers at the Hebrew University in Israel are the first to demonstrate that the unconscious processing of reading material and the manipulation of mathematical problems that require multiple step solutions can be done unconsciously. The research was presented in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on November, 12, 2012.

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Tarzan of the planet earth - OUPblog (blog)

Tarzan of the planet earth - OUPblog (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Tarzan of the planet earth OUPblog

 

the intense reaction to Burroughs’ novel and its eponymous hero is a significant aspect of Tarzan’s history. It may be somewhat trite to say, but is nonetheless true, that Tarzan struck a chord with a large and wide-ranging audience 100 years ago, in ways that transformed the character from just another pulp hero and into an American cultural icon and a global phenomenon. As I write in that introduction, “the significance of the figure of Tarzan cannot be underestimated, certainly in relation to American culture, but arguably to global culture as well, given that the Tarzan novels have been reportedly translated into over fifty languages.” Part of Tarzan’s continued popularity, of course, stretches beyond the printed word, and arises from Edgar Rice Burroughs’ own management of his creation and his recognition of the role to be played by the then new media of film. That note struck by Tarzan’s popularity, much like the sound of his famous yell in the popular Johnny Weissmuller films of the 1930s and 40s, was literally heard around the world.

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South Coast Rep's Bible of Life

South Coast Rep's Bible of Life | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Bill Cain's play "How to Write a New Book for the Bible:

 

A play such as this doesn't serve as a reminder that theater remains a viable art form. Rather, it shows that theater is fundamental to the human experience. You don't reach emotional catharsis on YouTube, Susan Boyle or not; you get it with real people performing in front of other real people, performing an ancient ritual in a holy space.

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How Paula Broadwell wronged her readers

How Paula Broadwell wronged her readers | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Biographers agree that Broadwell wronged her readers -- and not just by sleeping with her subject...

 

If we have learned anything from the past decade of book-world scandals — whether over plagiarism, fabrication, Internet sock puppetry or simple inaccuracy — it’s that what seems like an obvious ethical violation to some observers will strike others as no big deal. Biography, a genre that can scale the heights or wallow in the gutter, is a particularly delicate enterprise. There’s no official — or even quasi-official — biographer’s code of ethics, and members of the profession are contemplating changing that. While informed readers are unlikely to confuse the likes of Broadwell with the the authors of definitive, years-in-the-making, doorstop “lives,” the biographical profession is at least slightly besmirched by the scandal. “When Jayson Blair did his nonsense, it reflected badly on all journalists,” said acclaimed biographer David Nasaw, “and this will reflect on all biographers.”

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'Muslim Protagonist' spotlights art, literature

'Muslim Protagonist' spotlights art, literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The idea for the event came from Mirzya Syed, BC '13, one of the event's organizers, who noticed a lack of Muslim characters in her literature classes.

 

Panelists stressed the importance of the arts and literature in educating people of all communities, placing a special emphasis on balancing personal ethnic stories with common human experiences. Being the Muslim protagonist “means being the most authentic, honest, sincere version of myself and making sure that I’m the one holding the pen writing my story,” Ali said.


In ethnic storytelling, “you’re taking complex ideas and translating them into things that people can understand,” Abdul-Matin said.

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