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Why Lack Of Women in Magazines is Linked to Dearth Of Women in Science

Why Lack Of Women in Magazines is Linked to Dearth Of Women in Science | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
PolicyMic

Why Lack Of Women in Magazines is Linked to Dearth Of Women in Science

 

The others address a lot of non-literary material: politics, economics, domestic and foreign policy, psychology, biography, history, and occasionally a book...

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Seattle writer David Shields can't stand most novels (And memoir? Don't get him started)

Seattle writer David Shields can't stand most novels (And memoir? Don't get him started) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Seattle writer David Shields can't stand most novels (And memoir? Don't get ...
OregonLive.com

 

The subject is his new book "How Literature Saved My Life," but the subject is really himself. Shields has written 14 books; all of them, once he abandoned fiction after three novels, are about him and his obsessions with popular culture and with big issues: sports, race, death. He writes in a form he calls collage, short bursts of personal essay and memoir and criticism and quotes from everywhere, blended into what he hopes is something new and exciting. He has no patience for narrative fiction and says he can't read long novels or long anything, really. It bores him.

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Rita Moreno's 6 favorite books

Rita Moreno's 6 favorite books | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Week Magazine
Rita Moreno's 6 favorite books

 

F

Feminine Psychology and Neurosis and Human Growth by Karen Horney (Norton, $20 each). Where does a young Latina in the 1950s find a healthy feminine role model? Struggling to figure out who I was, I eagerly read an article by German psychoanalyst Karen Horney — later published in Neurosis and Human Growth — on what she called "the tyranny of the should." Her writings helped change the course of my life. Intentionally or not, Dr. Horney was a trailblazer of the feminist movement.



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Dudes and Democrats - City Journal

Dudes and Democrats - City Journal | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Dudes and Democrats

City Journal

 

Szalay argues that the work of novelists such as Norman Mailer, John Updike, E. L. Doctorow, and William Styron made them “the most important political strategists of their time.” They paved the way, he rightly argues, for the creation of the contemporary liberal lifestyle of upwardly mobile people who, in their twenties and thirties, are square by day, swingers by night. Today, we might call them hipsters. By the time they settle into genuine adulthood, they’re no more capable of defending the bourgeois virtues that propelled their careers than a Communist commissar would be. But Szalay’s thesis also entails considerable overstatement: the sixties novelists, he asserts, cleaved the ties between economics and culture that Daniel Bell identified in The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism. A writer less attached to antique Marxist categories would have noted that the split between culture and economy was, in large measure, a matter of unprecedented affluence undermining the self-discipline and social relations that had long buttressed economic prosperity.

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Unlocking Indonesia Through An Exploration of Its Literature

Unlocking Indonesia Through An Exploration of Its Literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Jakarta Globe

Jakarta Globe

 

Thanks to the reading of the novels, however, I now had access to this shared world, and I could at last understand the existential orientations of my friends,...

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Good sex in literature: why is it so hard to find?

Good sex in literature: why is it so hard to find? | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Good sex in literature: why is it so hard to find?

 

Julian Barnes, writing in this week's Radio Times, identifies a specifically British problem about sex in literature. Ever since the ban on DH Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover was overturned in 1960 (when Booker-winning Barnes was 14), what was a blanket prohibition has been replaced by almost the reverse: "not just a writerly desire, but a commercial obligation to write in a detailed way about sex". On the one hand, at least we were catching up with all those mucky foreign writers – Jack Kerouac, Henry Miller, Pauline Réage and Georges Bataille – who'd been writing about sex for years without the postmaster general puffing and blowing unerotically in their collective earhole. But post-Chatterley, there was a problem for newly liberated BritLit, contends Barnes. "Sometimes all that happened was that the misleading old euphemisms were replaced by the misleading new cliches." Typical British: they come too late – and then unedifyingly.

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The Mixed Results of Male Authors Writing Female Characters

The Mixed Results of Male Authors Writing Female Characters | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Mixed Results of Male Authors Writing Female Characters

The Atlantic

 

Psychologist Dr. Vivian Diller believes, "Authors who write about their own gender use their internal experience and speak from the inside out. When they write about the opposite sex, their perspective has to shift—from the outside in. Neither is necessarily better but rather they try different points of view."

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Humanism's faith in reason represents our best hope - The Guardian

Humanism's faith in reason represents our best hope - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian

Humanism's faith in reason represents our best hope 

 

Humanism is a non-religious ethical outlook based on an interest in human affairs at the human scale. It is not a doctrine or a set of rules; it is a starting point, its founding idea being that ethics must be based on the facts of human experience. For some, the result of thinking for themselves about ethics might be close to a conventional moral outlook; for others, the result might be less conventional. Either way, there are just two constraints: that one's choices must not be aimed at harming others, and that one must be able to make a solid case for one's outlook if challenged by others.

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Pakistan: Not just India's unhinged sister - Salon

Pakistan: Not just India's unhinged sister - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Salon

Pakistan: Not just India's unhinged sister

 

if you look beyond the increasingly grim and sordid headlines and peer deeper into history, you will discover a Pakistan of brilliant, artistic richness as heard in the Qawwalis mastered by the late, great Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan or the philosophical meditations of Urdu poets Iqbal and Faiz.

 

Turn to the present. You are now witnessing the rise of a new wave of Pakistani authors writing fiction in English. They are informed and influenced by the unique challenges and cultural specifics of modern Pakistan, but they are grounding them for international audiences in universal themes of identity, love, religion, politics, class and family.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A conversation with one of those rising Pakistani writers, Mohsin Hamid

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The man behind 'Monstress'

The man behind 'Monstress' | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The man behind 'Monstress'
Rappler

 

The short story as a genre is not a terribly popular one—next to poetry, it’s one of the hardest genres for publishers to sell. One author who is getting praise for his mastery of the genre is Filipino-American author Lysley Tenorio, who is in Manila to talk about his debut collection, Monstress.

Published by Ecco, Monstress is a collection of portraits of eight “othered,” marginalized protagonists such as lepers, transsexuals, B-movie monster starlets, and a young comic book-obsessed immigrant.

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A literary bridge - The Hindu

A literary bridge - The Hindu | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Hindu
A literary bridge

 

I don’t remember exactly when Indira Goswami had announced to the Assamese media that she was working on a novel about the forgotten, legendary Bodo heroine Thengphakhri, who had apparently worked as a Tehsildar during the British regime in Assam. Thengphakhri is a compelling character to write a novel on. When the educated Indians, social reformers and the British government were trying to fight misogynist practices such as Sati, child marriage, purdah-system and encourage widow-remarriage, in Assam there was a woman working with the British officers, shoulder to shoulder, as a tax collector who rode a horse, wore a hat and had knee-length black hair. But the sad truth is that, until Goswami wrote about her, most people in Assam hadn’t even heard of this extraordinary lady.

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Literature does not stop at national borders

Literature does not stop at national borders | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Guardian
Literature does not stop at national borders

 

If the structure of national literature can be understood from a shared-language perspective, it occurs to me that no language can be defined by nationality. This is because language does not belong merely to those of the same race, but to communities. What is more, just as a language can contain repertories of borrowed words from other languages so can it play host to other languages that have melded into each other. For example, within the structure of Turkish there are reams of words borrowed from Arabic, Persian, Greek, Kurdish, French and English. On the other hand there is no intellectual benefit to be gained from hiding powerful literary texts away in the drawer marked "national literature". I have no objection to the lyrical lexical composition of Turkish literature being compared to Japanese literature, which introduced incomparable literary genres to world literature; or to Chinese literature, the first exponent of prose and essentially regarded at the progenitor of the novel. On the contrary, I see these characterisations as being the key to pluralism and diversity. What I disagree with is the idea of a nation being incubated upon a literature, as once literature is made into a vehicle, the population begins to be drawn into social engineering.

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Reviewed: Field Notes from a Hidden City: an Urban Nature Diary by Esther Woolfson

Reviewed: Field Notes from a Hidden City: an Urban Nature Diary by Esther Woolfson | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Reviewed: Field Notes from a Hidden City: an Urban Nature Diary by Esther Woolfson

 

It’s impossible actively to dislike Field Notes from a Hidden City. It is genial, readable, warm-hearted and on nature’s side. Yet it is, in all senses, a tame book. Woolfson likes urban nature to the extent that it comes into her willing embrace. It would have been a braver and more valuable book if she had taken on the challenge of these more wilful, multicultural denizens, which ride into civilisation on our coat-tails but keep a defiant independence. They may increasingly shape the contours of wildness in our overdeveloped country.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at a book that examines urban encroachment on the natural world

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New Study Reveals Which Authors Have Ignored Women Most - TIME

New Study Reveals Which Authors Have Ignored Women Most - TIME | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
TIME
New Study Reveals Which Authors Have Ignored Women Most


a recent study—reported this morning by Popular Science—has found that some of the most respected authors in literary history don't exactly treat men and women equally.

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Top novelists look to ebooks to challenge the rules of fiction

Top novelists look to ebooks to challenge the rules of fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Guardian
Top novelists look to ebooks to challenge the rules of fiction

 

In the vanguard is Iain Pears, the best-selling historical novelist and author of An Instance of the Fingerpost and Stone's Fall. Pears will offer readers the chance to go back to check detailed elements of his narrative and will even flag up sections they do not have to read. "I am trying to find a new way of telling stories, and once you start thinking about it, there are almost too many possibilities," said the Oxford-based writer, who is completing an interactive ebook for Faber that will stretch the form to its current limits. "There is no reason to think the printed book will be the defining literary format. I don't want to be cautious any more. This is about changing the fundamentals. The worst that can happen is that it won't work."

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Because novel readers are more socially intelligent

Because novel readers are more socially intelligent | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Because novel readers are more socially intelligent

The Express Tribune

 

For many of us thus, it would be highly fitting to know that a stream of research coming from the psychology departments in York University and University of Toronto in Canada is evidencing that fiction-reading leads to one being more empathising and socially intelligent.

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Sexy vampires - The Aggie

Sexy vampires
The Aggie


Beginning with Bram Stoker's Dracula, the vampire trope was used in Western European literature to describe psychological and social maladies rather than just physical ailments.

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Beyond Waikiki Beach: Take a literary tour of Hawaii

Beyond Waikiki Beach: Take a literary tour of Hawaii | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Globe and Mail
Beyond Waikiki Beach: Take a literary tour of Hawaii

 

So while preparing to visit family in Hawaii, I was pleasantly surprised to discover the gross inaccuracy of my Elvis-movie-abetted notions of the state. Several substantial writers – the likes of Robert Louis Stevenson, Paul Theroux, Joan Didion, Mark Twain and Jack London – have travelled here and described their encounters. There is also a long history of locals writing with passion and knowledge. And these observant visitors and residents can take the curious traveller well beyond Waikiki’s pristine beaches, right into the thick of things.

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Men still dominate books world, study shows

Men still dominate books world, study shows | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Guardian
Men still dominate books world, study shows

 

Male authors and reviewers continue to take a disproportionate slice of the literary pie, according to new research which reveals that publications including the London Review of Books, the Times Literary Supplement and the New Yorker all show a considerable bias towards men.

 

Vida, an American organisation for women in the literary arts, has analysed the reviews and bylines in a cluster of publications annually for the last three years in an attempt to highlight the huge imbalance between male and female authors and reviewers. But the latest figures show that little has changed since 2010: at the LRB, in 2012 24% of reviewers were women (66 out of 276), with 27% of books reviewed written by women. At the New York Review of Books, 16% of reviewers were women, with 22% of the books reviewed written by women. At the TLS, 30% of the 1,154 reviewers were women, and 25% of the 1,238 books reviewed were written by women.

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Bookmarks: Marisa Silver's novel inspired by Dorothea Lange's famous photo

Bookmarks: Marisa Silver's novel inspired by Dorothea Lange's famous photo

OregonLive.com

 

Marisa Silver's new novel "Mary Coin" is inspired by a classic American photograph and the women on either side of the camera when it was taken. The photograph is called "Migrant Mother," the subject was Florence Owens Thompson and the photographer was Dorothea Lange.

[. . .]

Silver's novel imagines three lives: Mary Coin, the woman in the photo; Vera Dare, the photographer; and Walker Dodge, a professor of cultural history who discovers a family secret in the photo many years later.

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From Woodrow Wilson to Twitter: A Q&A with Joyce Carol Oates

From Woodrow Wilson to Twitter: A Q&A with Joyce Carol Oates | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
From Woodrow Wilson to Twitter: A Q&A with Joyce Carol Oates

 

The Seattle Times (blog)

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

I highly recommend that you follow Joyce Carol Oates on Twitter. Her tweets are always truly bright little gems.

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I'll tell you what's funny - Salon

I'll tell you what's funny - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Salon

I'll tell you what's funny

 

Humor is a complicated phenomenon, and highly dependent on context, as Seth MacFarlane recently learned. The Oscar host’s much-discussed performance – and in particular his quasi-ironic opening musical number, “We Saw Your Boobs” – has inadvertently launched a cultural debate about several interlocking subjects, including sex and gender in Hollywood, whether p.c. attitudes are destroying humor, and the role of Twitter and other social media during major cultural events. That’s without even getting into the unresolvable and inherently subjective question of what’s funny and what’s not.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

How DO we decide what makes a joke funny?

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Author's notes: Anna Lewis - WalesOnline

Author's notes: Anna Lewis

Wales Online

 

Why, after hundreds or even thousands of years, are new generations of writers still compelled to turn back to the literature of the past and to re-write it, again and again?

 

For me, writing poems about myths and folktales is a way of reading the tales more deeply.

 

Part of the appeal of these ancient stories is that their emotional and moral resonance, as well as their sense of peril, can still affect us today; but unlike in modern literature, we rarely get inside the characters’ heads.

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TV Friday: Touch is sexier, but still spiritual

TV Friday: Touch is sexier, but still spiritual | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Canada.com
TV Friday: Touch is sexier, but still spiritual

 

"I’ve been interested in this theme of interconnectivity for a long time, and this is really a chance to continue what you might call social-benefit storytelling, the idea of using an archetypical narrative to create and promote a positive energy in the world,” Kring said. “The emerging story of our time, I think, is that we are more connected to one another than we ever thought or knew. That’s borne out by the whole social-networking world we live in. We need to figure that out and to solve the bigger problems we all face.”

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

On Fox TV's show "Touch"

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Life and literature in Pakistan

Life and literature
DAWN.com

 

This criticism springs from a narrow appreciation of the place of literature in a people’s life and the responsibility of writers not only to enable fellow beings to gainfully fill their leisure hours (if anyone still has such time available) but also to help them realise themselves in various fields, especially in times of conflict, turmoil and distress. Through interaction with farmers, workers and social activists, writers and artists too will find the means of enriching their thought and refining their expression.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

How two literary festivals in Pakistan contributed to the country's national narrative; discussion of the interaction between literature and society

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