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Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction - Los Angeles Times

Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction
Los Angeles Times

 

"There's a sense among readers and critics, and probably among authors too, that [science fiction and fantasy] are somehow more fictional than regular fiction," says Lev Grossman, author of the bestselling Magicians series. "They're more loosely tethered to the real world, so they don't reflect or aren't affected by what's happening in it. Which is silly if you think about it. Mrs. Dalloway is no more real than Harry Potter."

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On Hiatus

Literature & Psychology is taking a break while I am traveling. Please check back after June 16, and thanks for reading.

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8 Things You May Not Know About “The Wizard of Oz” - History

8 Things You May Not Know About “The Wizard of Oz” - History | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Explore the story of this literary classic and its author, L. Frank Baum, whose jobs ranged from chicken breeder to frontier storekeeper before he struck literary gold in 1900.

 

Find out more about “Oz,” including how Baum struck literary gold in his 40s then later attempted to end his famous series, why the movie version wasn’t a blockbuster when first released and what color Dorothy’s magical slippers are in the original book (hint: they’re not ruby red).

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Sea Literature Is a Sight for Shore Eyes

As summer nears, thoughts might turn to cruise ships, sailboats, and other relaxing watercraft. But we're here to talk about vessels and voyages in literature, where sea things are often more drama...
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How America Fell for the Private Eye - Daily Beast

How America Fell for the Private Eye - Daily Beast | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Ross Macdonald wrote his share of classic American detective stories. Here he takes a busman’s holiday and explores the origins of Sam Spade, Philip Marlowe and his own Lew Archer.
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Jodi Picoult on the Darker Side of Fairy Tales and Writing with Her Daughter - Phoenix New Times

Jodi Picoult on the Darker Side of Fairy Tales and Writing with Her Daughter - Phoenix New Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In the last couple weeks, New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult's daughter, Samantha van Leer, had to have a special meeting with a dean at Vassar College to move her statistics final.
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Is Laszlo Krasznahorkai about to be huge? - The Week Magazine

The winner of the Man Booker International Prize takes a rare turn in the spotlight
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The Philosopher Novelist - The New Republic

The Philosopher Novelist - The New Republic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Milan Kundera's latest novel becomes a “hymn to insignificance,” an ode to the ephemera of personal and political life.
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Vivian Gornick: 'Most people who are writing memoirs are not writers'

Vivian Gornick: 'Most people who are writing memoirs are not writers' | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Now 79, the writer has a new memoir out, and has firm views on both that form and her other lifelong passion, feminism
The first thing one notices about Vivian Gornick’s apartment is how spare it is.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Great article on a writer I much admire.

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So You Think You're a Literary Critic? 19 Books for Understanding Literature

So You Think You're a Literary Critic? 19 Books for Understanding Literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
From literary criticism to literary theory, the world has no shortage of people prepared to offer a strong opinion on literature. Here are 19 books covering the phenomenon.
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A solid list of resources

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Wrestling With Saul Bellow: A New Biography Renews the Fight Over the ... - Vulture

Wrestling With Saul Bellow: A New Biography Renews the Fight Over the ... - Vulture | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Brute or genius? Loathed or loved? For me, the war is personal.

 

Bellow, who won more literary prizes than any other American writer — three National Book Awards, a Pulitzer Prize, and the Nobel Prize in 1976 — has always aroused strong emotions. John Berryman, an intimate of Bellow, dedicated a poem in his Dream Song cycle to him. Anne Sexton, also a Bellow friend and swept up — unromantically — into Bellow’s magnetism, used a passage from Herzog as the epigraph to her Pulitzer Prize–winning Live or Die. Herbert Gold, once a friend of Bellow, lashed out at him in his memoir, describing him as a solipsist “who banged on his high chair with his spoon.” Philip Roth presented a thinly disguised Bellow as a suave meganarcissist in the character of Felix Abravanel in The Ghost Writer. Salman Rushdie and Ian McEwan both wrote novels based on earlier novels by Bellow. 

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Welcome to Literature's Duchamp Moment - The New Republic

Welcome to Literature's Duchamp Moment - The New Republic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
We don’t live like nineteenth-century French novelists anymore, so we should stop writing according to their conventions.

 

Call them, instead, the Reality Hunger generation, after David Shields’ ingenious and prophetic 2008 manifesto on contemporary writing. For Shields, novels that employ the traditional conventions of narration, plot, and story no longer make sense. Reality is fiction, and fiction is reality. For a more accurate reflection of how we experience this reality, we ought to think of novels the way we think about art. “A novel, for most readers—and critics—is primarily a ‘story,’” writes Shields. “But a work of art, like the world, is a living form. It’s in its form that its reality resides.” So if form is now all-important—more so than content—what is the form that contemporary works of art so often take? Collage. This also happens to be the form of Reality Hunger. In addition to outlining the future of artistic production, Reality Hunger doubles as a blueprint for it: It is a pastiche, a series of intentionally “plagiarized” aphorisms, presented without quotation marks.

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Writing a Psychological Thriller by C L Taylor

Writing a Psychological Thriller by C L Taylor | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Characters need to have a goal, something they desperately want more than anything else in the world. It has to be something that’s difficult for them to attain, there have to be a lot of risks and difficult decisions involved and there has to be real, or imagined (there’s the unreliable narrator again), danger along the way. If your reader likes your character enough they’ll be mentally urging her on to achieve her goal, holding their breath as they turn the pages.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This advice for writers also benefits readers.

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Can't wait for “True Detective 2″? Dive into Ross Macdonald's California noir ... - Salon

Can't wait for “True Detective 2″? Dive into Ross Macdonald's California noir ... - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The legendary writer of psychoanalytic mysteries captured the culture of postwar California better than anyone
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Literary Tourist | » Blog Archive » Writing Places project engages public with literary history

Literary Tourist | » Blog Archive » Writing Places project engages public with literary history | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Writing Places project engages public with literary history http://t.co/phWMzu3LHX
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From the U.K.

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Misplaced: why do novelists disguise real locations? - The Guardian

Misplaced: why do novelists disguise real locations? - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Whether to spare local feelings, to emphasise that their stories are fiction, or to license fanciful embroidering, writers love to hide the actual settings of their work
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40 Famous Authors On Reading

40 Famous Authors On Reading | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Any truly great writer also needs to be a voracious reader. Your favourite author probably has a list of favourite authors who also have a list of favourite authors and so on.

Via Sharon Bakar
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Agatha Christie's little-known Syrian memoir to be republished

Agatha Christie's little-known Syrian memoir to be republished | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Come, Tell Me How You Live recounts travels with her archaeologist husband after the second world war and features little-seen photographs Agatha Christie is best known as the ingenious plotter of scores of murder mysteries, but the queen of crime...
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Orson Welles memoir found 30 years after great director's death

Orson Welles memoir found 30 years after great director's death | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Newly found autobiography details Citizen Kane director’s musings on Hemingway, Rita Hayworth and DW Griffith An unfinished memoir by Orson Welles has been discovered by archivists at the University of Michigan more than three decades after the...
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In 'All the Wild That Remains,' David Gessner illuminates two great writers on ... - Washington Post

In 'All the Wild That Remains,' David Gessner illuminates two great writers on ... - Washington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In ‘All the Wild That Remains,’ David Gessner illuminates two great writers on the American West.

 

If you mention Wallace Stegner or Edward Abbey to a reader in the Western United States — Utah, say, or Montana — you’re likely to hear a strong opinion, and possibly even a personal anecdote, about “Wally” or “Ed,” two of the most influential Western novelists and environmentalists of the 20th century. But when David Gessner told friends in the East he was writing a book about them, “their names, as often as not, elicited puzzlement.” Did he mean Wallace Stevens? Edward Albee? This, even though “Stegner and Abbey were both so firmly entrenched in the pantheon of writers of the American West that if the region had a literary Mount Rushmore their faces would be chiseled on it.”

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Amitav Ghosh: ‘There is now a vibrant literary world in India – it all began with Naipaul’

Amitav Ghosh: ‘There is now a vibrant literary world in India – it all began with Naipaul’ | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The books interview: The writer discusses boiling in his Delhi garret, climate change in the Bay of Bengal and finishing his opium wars trilogy
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When Did Books Get So Freaking Enormous? The Year of the Very Long Novel

When Did Books Get So Freaking Enormous? The Year of the Very Long Novel | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When did books get so freaking long?

Via Sharon Bakar
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The Psychological Comforts of Storytelling

The Psychological Comforts of Storytelling | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Why, throughout human history, have people been so drawn to fiction?
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Multiple theories about why we are so drawn to stories.

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The brilliant Brontë sisters are getting a BBC series - Entertainment Weekly (blog)

The brilliant Brontë sisters are getting a BBC series - Entertainment Weekly (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë, together one of the most fascinating and mysterious literary trios in history, are coming to television.

Sally Wainwright, award-winning writer of Happy Valley and Last Tango in Halifax, will write and direct To Walk Invisible: The Brontë Sisters. Wainwright said to BBC: “I’m thrilled beyond measure that I’ve been asked by the BBC to bring to life these three fascinating, talented, ingenious Yorkshire women.”

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Author Anna Clark explores Michigan's rich literary history

Author Anna Clark explores Michigan's rich literary history | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Michigan has a long and well-known history of car manufacturing, mining, logging, and agriculture. But there's something else this state produces: writers.

 

Anna Clark's new book explores the lives of ten of Michigan's most notable writers. Michigan Literary Luminaries: from Elmore Leonard to Robert Hayden is a collection of essays that are not just biographies.

. . .

These profiles go beyond basic timelines and major milestones. Clark examines her subjects' day-to-day lives in a way that adds context to their literary works. Lost in the flurry of the thousand biographies in existence is how these larger-than-life characters juggled their responsibilities, rents, families, and jobs with a rarely lucrative passion.

 

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Top 10 (unconventional) ghosts in literature - The Guardian

Top 10 (unconventional) ghosts in literature - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
These ghosts do not need to rattle chains and howl; they may not necessarily scare, but they manage to haunt, long after the pages have been turned

 

“In literature,” says the writer Tabitha King, “the ghost is almost always a metaphor for the past.” This is true for literal ghosts who manifest in graveyards, and it’s true for figurative ghosts who are no more substantive than insistent memory. The ghosts I list here may not be what we usually think of when we hear the word “ghosts”. But these are the phantoms that kept me turning pages, the ones I never forgot when I finished the book. That means they are haunting me still, and really – what more can one ask of a ghost?

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