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Our Inner Voices

Our Inner Voices | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

PLoS Blogs (blog)
Our Inner Voices

 

A pastiche of a post, putting together ideas and research on inner voices:

-How to document the conversations we carry on with ourselves most everyday (in the West at least)
-The importance of inner voices for rebuilding our notion of mental illness
-The role hearing voices (and working with those voices) can play in therapy for schizophrenia
-What it’s like to be without such an inner voice
-The inner voices in addiction.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Fascinating

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For One Crime Writer, Peaceful Shetland Is A Perfect Place For Murder - WSIU

For One Crime Writer, Peaceful Shetland Is A Perfect Place For Murder - WSIU | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
For One Crime Writer, Peaceful Shetland Is A Perfect Place For Murder
WSIU

 

"And then I thought, because I'm a crime writer: If there was blood as well, it would be really quite mythic," she says. "Like fairy stories with those colors — like 'Sleeping Beauty' or 'Snow White.' And just with that image I started writing Raven Black."

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

On the Shetland Islands as the perfect setting for crime

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Could reading dark literature harm your teenage children? - Irish Independent

Could reading dark literature harm your teenage children? - Irish Independent | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Irish Independent
Could reading dark literature harm your teenage children?
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A good look at both sides of this question. Includes a list "Five disturbing books that children should read"

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Five Indigenous female writers who should be on school reading lists - The Guardian (blog)

Five Indigenous female writers who should be on school reading lists - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)

Five Indigenous female writers who should be on school reading lists T

 

Overall, AustLit’s BlackWords dataset show women make up roughly half of the 5,452 First Nations writers in Australia, both past and present. That’s a lot of literature, stories, knowledge, opinions, commentary and perspectives to engage with, and the voices are as diverse as the nations these women come from: Wiradjuri, Wakka Wakka, Wadi Wadi, Wurundjeri to name a mere few.

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“Mr. Mercedes”: How Stephen King’s killers mirror real-life murderers

“Mr. Mercedes”: How Stephen King’s killers mirror real-life murderers | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The writer has long penned thrillers that hew uncomfortably close to bloody reality

 

But while it can’t be claimed to be either predictive or prescriptive, “Mr. Mercedes” proves to be more nuanced than it first appears. Perhaps it can make its readers think a little more closely about the heart of darkness in American culture.

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200 years on, Scott's Waverley is a must-read - Herald Scotland

200 years on, Scott's Waverley is a must-read

Herald Scotland

 

A ditherer and switherer, a reader and romantic, Edward Waverley is an unlikely hero. That his name graces Edinburgh's main railway station, a New York street, a pricey pen and much more besides is testimony to Scott's remarkable powers as a novelist. Waverley is not only the first historical novel but the first political novel, pitting pre-enlightenment Jacobite society against the so-called rational regime of the Georgian court in London.

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Reading Rainbow's Kickstarter campaign rakes in more than $6 million - Los Angeles Wave Newspapers

Reading Rainbow's Kickstarter campaign rakes in more than $6 million - Los Angeles Wave Newspapers | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Reading Rainbow's Kickstarter campaign rakes in more than $6 million
Los Angeles Wave Newspapers


He believes that they should be able to see themselves in characters that appear in literature they read.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Sometimes the good guys win

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A full-on CanLit feud - Macleans.ca

A full-on CanLit feud - Macleans.ca | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A full-on CanLit feud
Macleans.ca

 

Last fall, the author, broadcaster and sexagenarian CanLit bad boy David Gilmour caused the the Internet to explode when he said he doesn’t “love women writers enough to teach them” in his modern short fiction class at the University of Toronto. In an interview with the online literary magazine Hazlitt, Gilmour revealed he teaches only “serious heterosexual guys”—that familiar “manly man” canon that includes Chekhov, Tolstoy, Fitzgerald, Henry Miller and Philip Roth. Outrage was immediate: Editorials were written, bloggers fulminated. Gilmour was branded “sexist,” “misogynist,” an archaic relic of white-man privilege.

 

Now, in a podcast and a long essay titled “Of a Smallness of the Soul,” released last month on The Biblio File blog, the novelist André Alexis, who is black, has added a new charge: racism. More specifically, Alexis accuses the narrator of Gilmour’s 2011 roman à clef, The Perfect Order of Things, of relying on “obvious racist tropes.” The source of Alexis’s aggrievement is the depiction of René Goblin, a character known to be based on Alexis. The essay also names reviewers of The Perfect Order of Things who Alexis argues overlooked the racial politics in the portrayal of “an ugly, jazz-loving and dreadlocked spook—given his marching orders by a character named ‘Lynch’—[who] ends up happy once he’s put in his place for dissing and then eyeballing an endlessly appalled white man.”

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Ana Castillo: A 'Chicana' Writer Breaks The Mold On Strong, Beautiful Women - Huffington Post

Ana Castillo: A 'Chicana' Writer Breaks The Mold On Strong, Beautiful Women - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Ana Castillo: A 'Chicana' Writer Breaks The Mold On Strong, Beautiful Women

Huffington Post

 

Her writing is populated by women who differ from the feminine archetypes in literature--Alice in Wonderland or Little Women -- who "were not anything like the women I knew or the girl I was." Rather, Castillo writes about "beautiful brown women -- and by beautiful, I don't mean an aquiline nose or tall and blond. Strong, resourceful, capable of making the best of it."

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Hedgehog versus fox: how do we tell the story of the novel? - New Statesman

Hedgehog versus fox: how do we tell the story of the novel? - New Statesman | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

New Statesman
Hedgehog versus fox: how do we tell the story of the novel?


There are two potential methods of narrating this story: a fox way and a hedgehog way, both of them rife with problems. In his study of War and Peace, Isaiah Berlin adapted a fragment by the Greek poet Archilochus – “The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing” – to divide centripetal thinkers who “relate everything to a single central vision” and centrifugal thinkers who “pursue many ends, often unrelated and even contradic­tory”. If you credit the novel with a single vision – for example, “The novel traces man’s alienation from God” – a clean, forward-thrusting narrative may emerge but you will commit imprecisions on every page (quibbles of the “What about Jane Austen?” variety may prove hard to silence). But although writing novel-history in accordance with Virginia Woolf’s statement that there is “no such thing as the novel, only ‘novels’” might allow for greater nuance, readers will be too busy wading through the names and movements and titles to thank you for your rigour.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at three recent books about the history of the novel as literary form

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Strange and Wistful: Randall Jarrell's Children's Books by Katherine Rundell

Strange and Wistful: Randall Jarrell's Children's Books by Katherine Rundell | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

For those who know him as a hardboiled reviewer, a kind of Philip Marlowe of literary criticism, it would seem an anomaly that he wrote five books for children. For those who know his poetry, though, it might not be surprising at all. His later work especially drew often on images of childhood—as in “The Lost Children,” which begins “Two little girls, one fair, one dark/One alive, one dead, are running hand in hand.” The adult poetry speaks of a desire for a lost innocence. This becomes a block in Jarrell’s work for children; great children’s literature has no truck with the idea that children are pure, as the target audience is very aware that they are not. Children, as children know best, can be nasty, brutish, and short. J. M. Barrie knew it; the closing sentence to Peter Pan makes it clear: “and thus it will go on, so long as children are gay and innocent and heartless.” Sendak, the illustrator of several of Jarrell’s books, knew it; Where the Wild Things Are is as chaotic as it is gleeful. And Jarrell’s stories are best when they are at their most dark and strange.

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Books for the Masses | Editors' Picks BEA 2014

Books for the Masses | Editors' Picks BEA 2014 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Fans of Boardwalk Empire would enjoy this crime thriller as well. ... Often philosophical, it's a fully illustrated book of literary criticism that examines the way we read and how we picture characters (“Characters have only implied corporeality.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An eclectic collection of book reviews by Library Journal from BookExpo America (BEA), which took place May 29–31 in New York City

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The Fantastic Life of Paulo Coelho: Between Insanity and Spirituality - Huffington Post UK

The Fantastic Life of Paulo Coelho: Between Insanity and Spirituality - Huffington Post UK | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Fantastic Life of Paulo Coelho: Between Insanity and Spirituality Huffington Post UK

 

Immensely quotable, universally appealing, read all over the world - that's Paulo Coelho, the indisputable king of popular Brazilian literature. The man behind The Alchemist, one of the best-selling novels ever written, may be a spiritual guru to many, but his past is marked by episodes of black magic, drugs and orgies.

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The Rise Of Young Adult Authors On The Celebrity 100 List - Forbes

The Rise Of Young Adult Authors On The Celebrity 100 List - Forbes | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Rise Of Young Adult Authors On The Celebrity 100 List

Forbes

 

Young Adult authors John Green and Veronica Roth, newcomers on this year’s Celebrity 100 list, sold approximately 8.5 million copies combined in 2013. Green’s The Fault in Our Stars propelled him to an estimated $9 million in yearly earnings, while Roth’s Divergent trilogy earned her around $17 million.

 

The rising popularity of an increasingly visible genre means there have never been as many Young Adult (YA) authors on the Celebrity 100 roster. Roth and Green join the queen of YA, J.K. Rowling, on this year’s rankings. (Fellow Celebrity 100 authors include stalwarts James Patterson and Stephen King.)

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Franco Moretti and the Science of Literary Criticism

Franco Moretti and the Science of Literary Criticism | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Should literary criticism be an art or a science? A surprising amount depends on the answer to that question.

 

Should literary criticism be an art or a science? A surprising amount depends on the answer to that question. If you’re an English major, what should you study: the idiosyncratic group of writers who happen to interest you (art), or literary history and theory (science)? If you’re an English professor, how should you spend your time: producing “readings” of the literary works that you care about (art), or looking for the patterns that shape whole literary forms or periods (science)? Faced with this question, most people try to split the difference: if you relate to criticism as an art, you take a few theory classes; if you relate to it as a science, you put on bravura close readings. . . .

 

Franco Moretti, a professor at Stanford, whose essay collection “Distant Reading” just won the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism, fascinates critics in large part because he does want to answer the question definitively.

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How conservative novelists can make a comeback - Washington Post

How conservative novelists can make a comeback - Washington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
How conservative novelists can make a comeback
Washington Post

 

In the cover story of the July 7 issue of National Review, Adam Bellow issued a refreshing call for conservatives to re-engage with mass culture. Specifically, he wants them to write more novels. He is not the first to suggest this–Mark Goldblatt considered the role of MFA programs in driving the literary establishment leftward in the same pages in 2010.

. . .

 I hope Bellow will not mind if I offer a little advice to conservative writers.

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List watch: A brief look at glazomania | drmarkgriffiths

List watch: A brief look at glazomania | drmarkgriffiths | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
As far as I am aware, there is no published empirical research on personality types and list making although there is some psychological literature showing that list making – as part of time management practices – appears to ...
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

For those of us who love our book lists

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Elizabeth Harrower: Australia's buried literary treasure is unearthed - The Guardian (blog)

Elizabeth Harrower: Australia's buried literary treasure is unearthed - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)

Elizabeth Harrower: Australia's buried literary treasure is unearthed

 

“Her great subjects are class, gender and power. She applies a spotlight to those things in a way I don’t think any other writer really does, with this intense, unsentimental and relentless psychological examination of men and women interacting with each other.”

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Stanford fellow investigates how literature shapes transnational fields of medicine

Stanford fellow investigates how literature shapes transnational fields of medicine | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Literary academic and Stanford Humanities Center fellow Alvan Ikoku explores how fictionalized accounts of the tropics and malaria research simultaneously foster and examine the foundations for global health.
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10 Most Reclusive Literary Geniuses

10 Most Reclusive Literary Geniuses | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The world’s greatest writers use their literary genius to illustrate and comment on the human condition. And yet, those who could be considered to have the best understanding of human feelings often choose to hide themselves away from the public eye. The stereotype of the reclusive author is not always true, but for these literary greats, a life of solitude had more appeal than the draws of fame and awards.

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5 British Literary Characters That Made a Comeback - Anglophenia

5 British Literary Characters That Made a Comeback - Anglophenia | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Anglophenia
5 British Literary Characters That Made a Comeback

 

Some literary creations are so potent they cannot be contained by one book, one series, or one author alone. They may make the move from the page to the stage, from the stage to the radio, from the radio to the television, and from the television to the movie screen, but what happens then?

. . .

Enter the literary sequel-erizers. They come in after the original author has become unavailable (most commonly through death) and rescue the characters, giving them new things to do in suitably respectful—but not-quite-the-same—prose clothes.

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How to write a modern ghost story - The Guardian

How to write a modern ghost story - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Guardian
How to write a modern ghost story
We don't believe in ghosts, so writing ghost literature for a modern readership presents particular challenges.

 

There is a fine balance between the psychological and the spectral. Ghost writing must involve a blurring between reality and madness or projection. So Sarah Waters's doctor in The Little Stranger slowly reveals himself to be an unreliable narrator; the protagonist of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper is either insane or accurate. The theory that the Governess in The Turn of the Screw may be a neurotic fantasist began when Edmund Wilson wrote his Freudian psychopathology interpretation in 1934, though I believe that James did not intend this. The dead Rebecca of Daphne du Maurier's novel skews the narrator's mind as powerfully as if she had appeared thumping round Manderley. The modern ghost writer inherits a tradition of unreliable narrators, vastly ramped up by later psychoanalytic thinking. I found it interesting to subvert this by writing about apparent madness, in a girl who insists on dressing as a shabby Victorian, while the real chaos lies where no one is looking.

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8 More African-Born Writers You Should Be Reading - Flavorwire

8 More African-Born Writers You Should Be Reading - Flavorwire | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
8 More African-Born Writers You Should Be Reading

Flavorwire

 

Fiction can be a revealing window into cultures that are unfamiliar to us — and reading the work of an author who lives in another country or was born across the world from us can elucidate a different point of view. Whether it be a country’s political situation, the lexicon, the history, or the people, immersing oneself in the fiction of a specific nation, region, or even an entire content can provide an opportunity to better understand other places and experiences. And, as a recent New York Times article noted, this is an especially great time for literature from Africa and by authors who were born there

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The Summer's Most Unread Book Is… - Wall Street Journal

The Summer's Most Unread Book Is… - Wall Street Journal | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Wall Street Journal

The Summer's Most Unread Book Is…

 

How can we find today's greatest non-reads? Amazon's "Popular Highlights" feature provides one quick and dirty measure. Every book's Kindle page lists the five passages most highlighted by readers. If every reader is getting to the end, those highlights could be scattered throughout the length of the book. If nobody has made it past the introduction, the popular highlights will be clustered at the beginning.

 

Thus, the Hawking Index (HI): Take the page numbers of a book's five top highlights, average them, and divide by the number of pages in the whole book. The higher the number, the more of the book we're guessing most people are likely to have read. (Disclaimer: This is not remotely scientific and is for entertainment purposes only!)

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An interesting take on summer reading

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, July 7, 6:29 AM
"A simple index drawn from e-books shows which best sellers are going unread"..
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How The Wire Is, and Isn't, "Dickensian" - Huffington Post

How The Wire Is, and Isn't, "Dickensian"
Huffington Post

 

The alternative to Dickensian melodrama is not, as Simon thinks, the bleak austerity of Greek tragedy, nor the allegory of a great white whale. It is better, modern melodrama -- one that even grants an occasional happy ending to a particular individual without betraying its principles of showing the way the "game is rigged" against the poor and black. The Wire thus is, and isn't, Dickensian. More properly, it is serial television melodrama in which good and evil are raised beyond the personal to the institutional level. If Dickens represented the great serial melodrama of his time, The Wire represents the great serial melodrama of our own.

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A two-male fairytale breaks ground in children's literature - Daily Californian

A two-male fairytale breaks ground in children's literature

Daily Californian

 

Let’s think back to bedtime stories: thin, hardbound books stacked atop the bedside table, unassuming but full of magic, wisdom and fantastical stories. Mother Goose, nursery rhymes, fairy tales and fables, princes slaying dragons, kings marrying off their fairest daughter to the most worthy suitor and the new royal couple living hetero ever after.

 

But what happens if the princess doesn’t want to get married? What if “hetero ever after” isn’t the only kind of happy ending?

 

University of the Pacific professor Jeffrey Miles answers these progressive questions in his groundbreaking children’s book, “The Princes and the Treasure.” The book follows Gallant and Earnest, two young bachelors on a quest to rescue Princess Elena, who was kidnapped by an evil witch. Along the way, they discover that teamwork and compatibility are their strongest suits and that neither of them was fit to marry the beautiful princess. Instead, they were meant to marry each other.

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