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72 Proverbs for Life… From Hell

72 Proverbs for Life… From Hell | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
72 Proverbs for Life… From Hell
PsychCentral.com (blog)


Several of the proverbs were familiar to me, from other reading, but I didn't know their origin in his book The Marriage of Heaven and Hell [by William Blake].

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Expansive in life and literature - Jewish Chronicle

Though a prolific and popular writer in her time, Naomi Jacob’s work has been somewhat neglected in recent years. However, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of her death, Corazon Books is publishing digital editions of her Gollantz family saga (the first of which is available now) spanning several volumes and generations of a Jewish family whose experiences take them all over Europe (Corazon Books ebook £1.99).

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Lemony Snicket and a Series of Unfortunate Remarks: A Brief History of Racism and Literary Awards

Lemony Snicket and a Series of Unfortunate Remarks: A Brief History of Racism and Literary Awards | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The “humor” is an attempt to acknowledge a changing social reality, but these jests also have the sinister effect of trying to put black writers in their place.

 

 the nature of “ill-conceived attempts at humor” is worth thinking about. Jokes are often a way of marking out territory and hiding social unease — and this was far from the first time a literary awards event has been the site of a badly framed racial comment.

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Ursula K. Le Guin's National Book Award Speech Was Stunning - Huffington Post

Ursula K. Le Guin's National Book Award Speech Was Stunning - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Ursula K. Le Guin, a science fiction author venerated for her poignant diction, gender-bending characters and eerily accurate speculations about politics and technology, was honored for her life's work at the 2014 National Book Awards. Her acceptance speech was both eloquent and bold in its predictions and accusations -- which is par for the course for the author, who's delivered a number of memorable commencement speeches.


In this speech, she targeted businesses aiming to commodify the art of writing (read: Amazon), and championed authors who delve into fantastical plots rather than sticking with straightforward realism. Accepting and sharing her award with "all the writers who were excluded from literature for so long," Le Guin offered many notable thoughts

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Grounded in erudition - The Hindu

Grounded in erudition - The Hindu | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Sharif Husain Qasmi and Saleem Akhtar, the recipients of this year’s Majlis-e-Farogh-e-Urdu award, look at the poets through the prism of psychoanalysis and search for Urdu works beyond the pale of colonial rule.
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What Absolutely Everyone Needs To Know About Isaac Asimov's Foundation - io9

What Absolutely Everyone Needs To Know About Isaac Asimov's Foundation - io9 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Soon, Isaac Asimov's legendary Foundation trilogy will be coming to HBO. But what do you need to know about this series, which explores questions of fate versus determinism and the cyclical nature of history?
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Books of the Year: NS friends and contributors choose their favourite reading ... - New Statesman

Books of the Year: NS friends and contributors choose their favourite reading ... - New Statesman | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Including: Hilary Mantel, Rowan Williams, Grayson Perry, Alan Johnson, A S Byatt, Geoff Dyer, Alex Salmond, Kate Fox, William Boyd and Dave Eggers. 
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Yesterday I saw the lot selling Christmas trees in my neighborhood Kmart was open. Now we have the opening of "best books of the year" season.

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10 period pieces to cheat English Lit 205: British literature on TV - A.V. Club Milwaukee

10 period pieces to cheat English Lit 205: British literature on TV - A.V. Club Milwaukee | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
With so many new series popping up on streaming services and DVD, it gets harder and harder to keep up with recent shows, much less the all-time classics.

 

Those satires have aged the best of the lot—mocking what the passage of time has proven needed mocking, and often looking toward the future with a cynical surety that the coming generations would know little better than this one. But even for those works that are frozen in time, or reveal more of the era around them by accident than by design, a good adaptation will apply a modern formula without disrupting the source. It will tease out the most complex readings of its characters (a benefit of having several hours of television as a canvas), let the camera describe the moors and the rooftops of Bath, and perhaps most importantly, bring new context to things that have been lost. Those in Austen’s era and a generation after would have innately understood the geometry of country dancing; to bring it to the screen is to raise it from the dead. When done well, the very nature of the form illuminates a foreign country until it starts to look a lot like home.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

The best TV adaptations of classic British literature texts.

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If Hamlet Had an iPhone: Talking With Mallory Ortberg About 'Texts From Jane ... - KQED

If Hamlet Had an iPhone: Talking With Mallory Ortberg About 'Texts From Jane ... - KQED | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The co-founder and editor of The Toast discusses her very funny new book, Texts from Jane Eyre, which imagines smartphones in the impulsive hands of classic literary characters.

 

Though it might seem like just another blog-to-book deal, Texts from Jane Eyre stands out from the rest. Part feminist literary critique, part tribute to classic literature and part dismantling of all that is holy and elevated, it’ll please the biggest book nerds and the grumpiest back-of-the-classroom freshman. But Ortberg downplays the notion that she’s created high satire (though she does love herself some P.G. Wodehouse). For her, it’s all just another day at the office, being funny as hell.

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The 10 Most Influential Science Fiction Stories of the 1920s - PJ Media

The 10 Most Influential Science Fiction Stories of the 1920s - PJ Media | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The 1920s were an important transition period in SF from the literary tradition of Wells to the wild west style action of what would become known as space opera. And even as Wells’ ability to fascinate faded, new writers, championed primarily in the United States by the likes of Edmond Hamilton and Jack Williamson, pioneered a growing market for pulp magazine based science fiction.

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EH Ward on staying the course to write his first racing thriller - Irish Times

EH Ward on staying the course to write his first racing thriller - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The feeling of seeing your book in print washes away the long hours spent hunched over a laptop. It’s a bit like watching your horse win a race

 

I find that writing what you know is a springboard or a lubricant. It gets you into it and permits you to give structure and colour to what pours out of you and, eventually, allows you to write what you don’t know with the same degree of clarity. Writing, like assessing horses at sales during my day job as a bloodstock manager, is a learning experience. As with any new venture, you make mistakes when you begin, but the more you do it, the better at it you become.

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Late-In-Life Surge Propels Writer Penelope Fitzgerald to Greatness - New York Observer

Late-In-Life Surge Propels Writer Penelope Fitzgerald to Greatness - New York Observer | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

What is most remarkable about Fitzgerald’s literary achievements is the relative lateness and frenetic pace of her output. Fitzgerald published her first book, a biography in 1975, when she was 58. Then she published four novels in the next five years, and won the Booker Prize for Offshore. Her last novel, her greatest, was The Blue Flower, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1997. She died in 2000.

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Alice Munro's 'Family Furnishings' is deep and surprising - Los Angeles Times

Alice Munro's 'Family Furnishings' is deep and surprising - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The most astonishing aspect of Alice Munro 's "Family Furnishings: Selected Stories, 1995-2014" may be its chronology.

 

We tend to forget that idea sometimes: to see stories, and especially stories written by women, as somehow peripheral, non-essential, when they are, in fact, the only thing we have. This is the primary faith of Munro's writing, that these lives, these interactions — often domestic, and only occasionally dramatic in the broadest sense — matter with the weight of life and death. "She is promising," Smiley insists, "no drama, no transcendence, only the peculiarity of objects that contain the history of our world and our ancestors, if not ourselves."

 

Such a line, between reality and fiction, life and literature, seems especially the province of the short-story writer, who can work by inference in a way novelists cannot.

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Turning Pages: What's the point of bibliomemoirs? - Sydney Morning Herald

Turning Pages: What's the point of bibliomemoirs? - Sydney Morning Herald | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
There are a lot of people writing memoirs about reading. What for?

 

Underneath this jolly collegial behaviour there's a deep insecurity. Does reading still matter? Does anyone else care the way I do? With so much to choose from, am I reading the right books? What are the right books anyway?

 

To the rescue comes a special kind of book: the bibliomemoir, a book about reading books. In the words of The New Yorker, "a new subgenre of books about books has emerged, a mix of literary criticism, autobiography, self-help, and immersion journalism: authors undertake reading stunts to prove that reading – anything – still matters".

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In Washington, D.C., a literary trail amid the monuments - The Denver Post

In Washington, D.C., a literary trail amid the monuments - The Denver Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In Washington, D.C., fans of the literary world can find some treasures amid the marble and monuments making up our nation's capital.
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Edinburgh, Scotland: A Bookworm's Haven - TravelersToday

Edinburgh, Scotland: A Bookworm's Haven - TravelersToday | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

For the people who experience both wanderlust and bibliophilism, there are several cities and countless sights to visit that will quench both passions simultaneously. Although, the best city to visit in the world for book lovers happens to be Edinburg, Scotland, the first ever UNESCO city of Literature.

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artist will spend 28 days in isolation wearing a virtual reality headset - Designboom

artist will spend 28 days in isolation wearing a virtual reality headset - Designboom | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

for 28 straight days, performance artist mark farid will wear a virtual reality headset, during which he will have no actual interaction with any human, and will only experience life through another person’s eyes and ears. ‘seeing-I‘ is a social-artistic experiment that seeks to investigate nurture vs. nature: how much of the individual is inherent personality and how large a portion is cultural identity.

the individual on the other end of the experiment — yet to be chosen, but currently being sought out through an application process – will be referred to as ‘the other’, required to wear a pair of virtual glasses at every moment of the day that covertly capture audio and video. this live footage will then be watched back by farid within the isolated environment he will inhabit — a gallery space in london comprising only a bed, toilet and shower. this area — as well as mark — will be on constant display to the audience. once ‘the other’ goes to sleep, the surrounding visitors will be asked to leave for one hour so that the artist can be evaluated by a psychologist with special training in neuroscience, while farid wears the headset throughout.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

I have to wonder if this is a good idea.

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Book explores works of women novelists in India - Business Standard

The development in the subject, technique and theme represented in the novels of women storytellers spread across 150 years in India is the subject of a new book.


In "Jasmine on a String: A Survey of Women Writing English Fiction in India", US-based literary critic Margaret Paul Joseph documents a journey of female writers through the 19th to 21st century, using the genre of the novel to describe their Indian experience.

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Talking With the Authors of 'Gone Girl' and 'Wild' - New York Times

Talking With the Authors of 'Gone Girl' and 'Wild' - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The authors of “Gone Girl” and “Wild,” both made into films this season, talk about confounding stereotypes and making their work relevant to men as well as women.

 

the authors share similarities that run deep. Feminists both, they create bluntly authentic, deeply engaging stories through characters that defy stereotypes.

 

They have also forged roads to Hollywood gold.

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Iconic Mystery Novelist James Lee Burke Charts His Path to Wayfaring Stranger - Paste Magazine

Iconic Mystery Novelist James Lee Burke Charts His Path to Wayfaring Stranger - Paste Magazine | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
This in-depth talk with iconic mystery novelist James Lee Burke—the most extensive and wide-ranging interview he’s ever done—began as we talked about the West, not the South.

 

It also allowed him the artistic freedom to eventually return to his first love and to explore the power of the written word to move the heart and the mind. Increasingly, Burke now calls upon his naturalist influences—Steinbeck, Faulkner, dos Passos—in historical literary fiction like his newest novel, Wayfaring Stranger. Alongside his more traditional Robicheaux mysteries, Burke’s historical fiction (White Doves at Morning) draws on his Texas and Louisiana roots, mining his plentiful and powerful familial stories and influences.

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Baddies in books: Hannibal Lecter, magnetic and unhinged - The Guardian (blog)

Baddies in books: Hannibal Lecter, magnetic and unhinged - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Cannibal psychopath he may be, but Lecter feeds our hungry fantasies of being singled out by a hyperintelligent outsider, writes Dan Holloway

 

If anything can explain the breadth of Lecter’s appeal, it is this structure of safety. Danger is always appealing to a part of our psyche. Many of us fantasise about being, or being chosen by, the hyperintelligent outsider who shuns all rules and disposes of enemies at will, while stopping for some Bach and Château D’Yquem on the way.

 

But such people are usually as dangerous to their friends as to their enemies: they are fundamentally unpredictable. The Lecter of The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal is not. Be honest and courteous and smart and you know that, all things being equal, you will not only live through the experience of sharing time with Lecter, you may be safer than in your day-to-day life. That gives us a secure mental space in which to conduct our daydreams, and explains why Lecter looms so large there.

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The Importance of Scaring Children - The Atlantic

The Importance of Scaring Children - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The long tradition of moral ambiguity and unhappy endings in kids' fiction returns with Evangeline Lilly's The Squickerwonkers.

 

Dark children’s stories aren't new (think Neil Gaiman, Lemony Snicket, or Roald Dahl), but the past few months have seen a resurgence in telling tales for children that blend pure horror with age-appropriate themes. Lilly’s book mixes creepy characters with lighthearted language (the book is written in limericks). September’s The Boxtrolls, based on Alan Snow’s Here Be Monsters!, used cartoonish character design to offset the fact that the plot follows an orphaned boy who lives with underground “monsters.” And October’s Guillermo Del Toro-produced The Book of Life—about a man who dies for his beloved—takes place in fantastical settings.

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'Mockingjay': Why the worst 'Hunger Games' book should make the best film - Entertainment Weekly

'Mockingjay': Why the worst 'Hunger Games' book should make the best film - Entertainment Weekly | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

That being said, Mockingjay is also a study of post-traumatic stress. After two books of children both killing and being killed, Collins uses Mockingjay to finally give her characters time to be damaged. That divide—one half of the book focuses on extreme emotion, while the other half focuses on extreme action—keeps Mockingjay from flowing as smoothly as the rest of the series. But it’s also why Mockingjay—Part 1, if done correctly, should make for the best film in the Hunger Games franchise thus far.

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In search of the literary South - The Globe and Mail

In search of the literary South - The Globe and Mail | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Visit the homes and haunts of notable authors to see how the settings shaped their classic writings

 

The U.S. South is a storied land – a place of swaying palms and Spanish moss, where history always seems recent and the warm, sultry breezes feel like poetry in motion. Not surprisingly, the South has served as inspiration for some of America’s greatest writers; it’s the land of Gone with the Wind and The Sound and the Fury and A Streetcar Named Desire, titles that evoke a kaleidoscope of vivid images at their very mention. And the best part: The literary South is a place you can visit, retracing the steps of authors and playwrights, seeing where they lived, wrote and even drank. Many of the most interesting spots are close to snowbird destinations. Here are some of the very best.

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Readers love a good anti-hero – so why do they shun anti-heroines? - The Guardian (blog)

Readers love a good anti-hero – so why do they shun anti-heroines? - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Emma Jane Unsworth: Monstrous men are more than welcome in serious fiction, but create an unlikeable female character and you’re in for trouble

 

what makes a good “anti-heroine”? The definition usually draws on two categories: bad behaviour and unconventional life choices. Anti-heroines come in many guises. Here are some of my favourites …

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Literary music death match: Did James Franco or Michael Chabon write the worst song lyrics in history?

Literary music death match: Did James Franco or Michael Chabon write the worst song lyrics in history? | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The lyrics on both their forthcoming albums are so dispiritingly bad, it's hard to choose VIDEO
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Is this a question that anyone really cares about?

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