Literature & Psyc...
Follow
5.6K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
onto Literature & Psychology
Scoop.it!

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit - NPR (blog)

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit - NPR (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
NPR (blog) Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit

 

the feminist complaints came from 19th century, upper class Irish critics who argued that peasant women shouldn't be wasting their time — and limited resources — on tea. If women had time to sit down and enjoy a tea break, this must mean they were ignoring their domestic duties and instead, perhaps, opening the door to political engagement or even rebellion."Drinking tea was thought to threaten traditional ways," explains researcher Helen O'Connell of Durham University in the UK. In the 1800s, tea was an affront to the virtues of frugality and restraint, which underpinned rural Irish culture.

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Literature & Psychology
interdisciplinary explorations
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Transrealism: the first major literary movement of the 21st century? - The Guardian (blog)

Transrealism: the first major literary movement of the 21st century? - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

It’s not science fiction, it’s not realism, but hovers in the unsettling zone in between. From Philip K Dick to Stephen King, Damien Walter takes a tour through transrealism, the emerging genre aiming to kill off ‘consensus reality’

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Fictional Books Within Books We Wish Were Real - Huffington Post

Fictional Books Within Books We Wish Were Real - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The list of invented books mentioned in fiction is extensive, and it's always somewhat fascinating to see a hint of an alternative universe where a creative work exists that we don't have access to in our world. Most tantalizingly, some authors offer scraps of text or information about these fictional texts, or even weave them closely into the plot of their own story. In these cases, it's almost unbearable to realize that we can never read these books.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A 'Pemberley' that's less than the sum of its parts - Boston Globe

A 'Pemberley' that's less than the sum of its parts - Boston Globe | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

For period drama fans, PBS’s “Death Comes to Pemberley” ought to be a big event — a Corset-palooza or a Bonnet-aroo. The “Masterpiece Mystery!” miniseries is an adaptation of P.D. James’s 2011 novel, which is a sequel of sorts to Jane Austen’s beloved “Pride and Prejudice” mashed together with one of James’s murder-mystery plots. . . . 

 

So I am sorry to report that the two-part “Death Comes to Pemberley,” which premieres Sunday at 9 p.m., is thoroughly and frustratingly middling.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Does Literary Criticism Suffer From Elitism?

Does Literary Criticism Suffer From Elitism? | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The book publishing world is undoubtedly at a critical juncture. The dawn of Internet content has reduced the attention span of readers, as the popularity of eBooks threatens the once-powerful world of print. All the while, literary criticism seems to be stalling on progress, favoring establishment views at the expense of covering books written and enjoyed by women or those outside a narrow subset of society.

We caught up with Flavorwire journalist Elisabeth Donnelly to get her insights on a topic she calls "exciting and scary," shared below.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Inside the world of Amazon Vine book reviewers: how I ended up with a mailbox ... - The Guardian

Inside the world of Amazon Vine book reviewers: how I ended up with a mailbox ... - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The internet market for books has become a hotbed of authors and reviewers behaving badly.

 

The reality is that the internet has democratized book reviewing, just as it has every other form of commentary that leads to a purchase decision. If you travel, you go to TripAdvisor. For a restaurant, you visit Yelp. No longer is classical music reviewing the sole domain of critics for Gramophone and the like. Music aficionados share their experiences, blogging and commenting wherever they can find a forum. This creates a system where one reviewer doesn’t wield power, but potential consumers can look at many different points of view. 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An article referenced here several days ago discussed Margo Howard's reaction to Amazon Vine reviewers. Here, an Amazon Vine reviewer address the ongoing issue of internet book reviewing, particularly by Amazon Vine reviewers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Religion And The Rise Of The Detective Story - Huffington Post

Religion And The Rise Of The Detective Story - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

There is a theory (brilliantly advanced by me in the introduction to my anthology, The Best American Mystery Stories of the 19th Century--and, oh, yes, by dozens of scholars before me) that the detective story was able to achieve success only when people gave up their absolute adherence to religion, a phenomenon that occurred in the 19th century. The notion is that we all have a sense of guilt impressed upon us at a young age and that it can only be relieved by a higher power: to wit, God, or one of his lieutenants. When the extraordinary power of religious devotion diminished, the door opened for a different agency to lessen our guilt and this took the form of a detective.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

From the august Otto Penciler

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Youth lit soars as angst leaves lit fit tied up in knots - Sydney Morning Herald

Youth lit soars as angst leaves lit fit tied up in knots - Sydney Morning Herald | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Bestseller lists and cinemas are being filled with teenage protagonists fighting cancer, oppression and creepy mazes, so it's tempting to write off the mega-hits of teenage literature as juvenile escapism.

 

What all these books have in common is that they break open their characters at a time when they're truly vulnerable, when they need to learn to act according to their own lights, usually by making terrible mistakes. They are sometimes excruciatingly painful to read, but they're uplifting as well. These characters are forced to look at themselves and their choices, and work through the grief, guilt and anger they feel to piece themselves back together stronger and more humble than before. There's a kernel of hope in these books, and a sense of purpose and potential. It might be broken, they say, but we can make it better.


The literary-fiction landscape for adults, meanwhile, is heaped with serious, densely over-written novels about middle-class marriages that aren't quite the fairy tales they seem on the surface.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An interesting take on why adults like YA literature, and what they can learn from it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

What do you think? Website lists greatest books ever written about Montana - Montana Standard

The Montana Mint website provides the following list of what it thinks are the greatest books ever written about Montana.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Literature of Fear: 12 High-Quality Horror Books for Sleepless Nights - KQED

The Literature of Fear: 12 High-Quality Horror Books for Sleepless Nights - KQED | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A visit to the book store might have you thinking that the horror genre is all vampires and serial killers. For those who enjoy the literature of fear, with a touch of the fantastic, there are still lots of great writers out there.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Authors pick their favourite crime novels - Toronto Star

Authors pick their favourite crime novels - Toronto Star | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Writers appearing at Toronto’s International Festival of Authors this month reveal their favourite crime reads.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Would it surprise you to learn that I'm a big fan of mystery fiction?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Six Essential British Murder Mysteries - Huffington Post

Six Essential British Murder Mysteries - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

From around the year 1800 to the present day, the British have taken an unhealthy interest in murder. Over two centuries, this fascination has appeared in journalism, theatre, tourism... and particularly, in the whole body of detective fiction. Its development went hand-in-hand with what we might call 'civilization' -- gas-lighting, a police force, industrialization, life in the city -- everything that allowed people to feel safe from nature and its dangers. If you'd been an eighteenth-century Briton, you'd probably have lived in a village, and your greatest fears would have been dying of disease or famine. In the nineteenth century, it's likely that you'd have moved into a town. Life there might have been cleaner and more convenient, but there was a drawback: you'd no longer know your neighbours. And so, in the cities, the Victorians began to have the luxury -- for a 'luxury' it is -- of obsessing about something as inherently unlikely as getting murdered. This new fear, therefore, went along with paranoia, and anxiety, and neurosis, and all the other things we 'enjoy' about modern life. 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Murder mysteries from the 1820s to 1935.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Common People review family history as a new genre of non-fiction

Common People review  family history as a new genre of non-fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Alison Light’s evocatively written Common People: The History of an English Family may well inaugurate a new genre of non-fiction: public family history. Today the internet and regional record offices around the country are buzzing with people tracing their genealogies, looking up long-dead ancestors. The vast majority of this work is kept in the family or posted online for millions of us to ignore. Light offers another path: family history not as a catalogue of names, dates, occupations and events, but as a generational history of interconnected people, where the historian’s task is to get a sense of how a life was made and what it felt like to make it that way. This isn’t history from below so much as history from inside, to use the author’s neat phrasing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State

The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Several of these books number among the usual suspects of lists of this kind, but many remain anything but widely known. Almost all are fiction and most are novels; some were written for children, but just about every genre is represented. All are literary in voice and spirit; every last one will let you understand a time and place in a more profound way than you maybe thought possible.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

What's your state's representative book? And do you agree with that selection?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Writing Life by David Malouf examines reading as an experience - Sydney Morning Herald

The Writing Life by David Malouf examines reading as an experience - Sydney Morning Herald | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The second volume of the author's collected essays often blurs the line between criticism and personal reflection.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Twice upon a time: 10 fictional characters who are given a novel of their own - Irish Times

Twice upon a time: 10 fictional characters who are given a novel of their own - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
As Diana Souhami’s new novel Gwendolen takes up the story of George Eliot’s character from Daniel Deronda, we bring you 10 more novels inspired by characters from literature
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

10 Seriously Scary Books That You Won't Find On the Thriller Shelves - Bustle

Bustle

10 Seriously Scary Books That You Won't Find On the Thriller Shelves

 

I’ve never been a horror fan — my imagination is much too active, and my childish fear of the dark is still much too present to be able to deal with that particular genre. But I actually think that other types of fiction — particularly realistic stories — has a way of snaking into our guts more effectively — more realistically, if you will — than shock-tactic-loaded thrillers do. Often, the books that stay with us the longest remain not because they are revolutionary, or earth-shatteringly enlightening, but because they are unequivocally messed up. And sometimes, these deeply disconcerting tomes aren’t actually shelved under the “horror” or “thriller” sections, but settle sneakily beside mainstream literary novels.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A pretty good list, to which I would add "I Am the Cheese" by Robert Cormier

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

You Don't Have To Listen To Every Classic Rock Album Backwards To Find A ... - WBUR

You Don't Have To Listen To Every Classic Rock Album Backwards To Find A ... - WBUR | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

For some, Halloween is the season of the witch. And that’s also the name of the classic 1966 psychedelic song by the Scottish musician Donovan. Now, it leads the title of a new book: “Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll.” In it, Cambridge author Peter Bebergal makes some deeply researched connections between rock musicians, the supernatural and spiritual rebellion.

. . .

“My argument is that the spirit of rock and roll — the essential rebellious instinct of rock and roll — is certainly social and sexual and political, but it’s also a spiritual rebellion,” Bebergal explained. “And the way in which it expressed that spiritual rebellion was through the occult imagination.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

175 of Your Favorite Horror Novels - BOOK RIOT

175 of Your Favorite Horror Novels - BOOK RIOT | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
we asked for your favorite books that are so scary that you have to store them in the freezer and only read them during daylight hours. Here’s what you came up with
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A long list, with lots of entries by Stephen King. Consult the list right now, because soon all these horror entries will be gone until next Halloween.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Literary Criticism Is Anti-Intellectual

Literary Criticism Is Anti-Intellectual | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

So the problem isn’t with the anti-intellectualism of the ignorant masses who “just do not get” lit-crit. The problem is that lit-crit is itself anti-intellectual, having set itself up as the purveyor of true-sight while dismissing whole fields of empirical research psychology, social interaction, or even human biology. [They reject this criticism, however, because they know that privileging "empirical" research is situated, dominating discourse and relies on a subject they've already "proved" to not exist.]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Top Ten LGBT Characters in Young Adult Literature

The Top Ten LGBT Characters in Young Adult Literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
While there are some absolutely wonderful characters who identify as part of the LGBT community, there is undoubtedly a need for more. These characters better serve to provide insight into the LGBT community, and perhaps even more importantly, they allow someone who identifies as part of the community to see themselves reflected in popular culture. It is crucial for there to be more diversity in the sexual orientation of characters who make up the world of Young Adult (YA) literature, since it is within that world that many young people first start to form opinions about themselves and the people around them. With an underwhelming number of 94 books published with any kind of LGBT character in them in 2013 (http://www.malindalo.com), and the majority of them having cisgender male protagonists, the need for more representation is evident. Here are ten of the most important YA characters who identify as a part of the LGBT community.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Sports talk can help students develop critical thinking skills, says Stanford ... - Stanford Report

Sports talk can help students develop critical thinking skills, says Stanford ... - Stanford Report | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Through research that blends cognitive science and the humanities, Stanford English professor Blakey Vermeule finds that an in-depth knowledge of athletics can be a tool to broaden the intellectual horizons of students.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

UK Court Blocks Author From Publishing A Book About His Own Sexual Abuse ... - Techdirt

There's no doubt that even closely related or allied countries treat the issue of free speech quite differently. Perhaps our most natural European cultural equivalent, Britain, has laws that I often find either confusing or silly, with a particular eye towards their long-panned libel laws. But even correcting for cultural differences, I'm having a real hard time figuring out how a UK court can issue an injunction barring the publishing of an author's recounting of his own personal history with sexual abuse at his ex-wife's request. You'll have to forgive the vagueness here, because there are simply no names being discussed on the matter due to the ongoing litigation.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A very odd story from the U.K.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Georges Perec Tells You How To Organize Your Bookshelf - Huffington Post

Georges Perec Tells You How To Organize Your Bookshelf - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Alphabetically, chronologically or autobiographically. Such are the methods of organization we select from when sorting our beloved collections of movies, records or books.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

What type of sorter are you? I've recently gone with "by genre, alphabetically by author within each genre."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Prophetic Nature of Fiction: Richard Wright, John Steinbeck, and the Civil Rights Movement

The Prophetic Nature of Fiction: Richard Wright, John Steinbeck, and the Civil Rights Movement | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Literature has always served as a moral, social and political laboratory for many writers and often the issues that have plagued various societies appear in fiction before they ever appear in the public, political or physical world.  When one examines any debate that has taken place in the political sphere, one can always find literature that dealt with the same issues well before its political incarnation.  In examining the peak of the civil rights movement in the 1950’s and 60’s, within the context of Richard Wright’s Native Son and John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, it becomes clear that these two novels served as literary laboratories for the civil rights issues and class struggles that America would grapple with throughout the middle of the 20th century.  . . .  When examining the comparing the contents of both Native Son and The Grapes of Wrath with the political writings and events of the American civil rights movement, it becomes clear that the writings of both Wright and Steinbeck served as a literary laboratory where the issues and events of the civil rights movement were foreshadowed and prophesized with sometimes tragic accuracy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

'Where We Are Now' a powerful collection of stories - The Missoulian

'Where We Are Now' a powerful collection of stories - The Missoulian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Carolyn Osborn’s new book left me wondering whether we need a new category for the contemporary fiction she’s writing.

 

This blurring of the ever-thinning line between novels and short-story collections brought to mind three recent titles: “Acts of God” by Ellen Gilchrist (Algonquin, $23.95) delivers 10 stories on a theme: surviving incontrovertible reminders of mortality, such as a hurricane, flood or tornado. Except for the theme, there is little overlap between the stories. Of the nine tales in Margaret Atwood’s “Stone Mattress” (Nan A. Talese, $25.95), three unravel the entanglements of a group of aging writers and artists. Blurring the lines almost completely in 2010, Publishers Weekly added up the shifting narrators in Jennifer Egan’s prizewinning “A Visit From the Goon Squad” and declared it a powerful novel of interconnected lives, while some reviewers labeled it a collection of linked short stories.

 

Do we need a new category for hybrid books? Let’s call them shortovels, perhaps. Or novestories?

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Why is a label so important?

more...
No comment yet.