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Life After a Ponzi Scheme: Victim Turns Million-Dollar Loss into Literature - DailyFinance

Life After a Ponzi Scheme: Victim Turns Million-Dollar Loss into Literature - DailyFinance | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Life After a Ponzi Scheme: Victim Turns Million-Dollar Loss into Literature DailyFinance

 

The money may be gone, but the memories of being a victim of a Ponzi scheme will not soon be forgotten. McCabe reached out to fellow victims and interviewed 200 of the 700 to find out how the scheme had affected their lives.

 

His research informs the pages of his novel Betrayed, which gives a personal perspective on the fallout from a financial tragedy.

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Literary democracy in action: 'The Little Free Library Book'

Literary democracy in action: 'The Little Free Library Book' | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
I’m a sucker for a Little Free Library . It is, to me, an almost perfect expression of literary democracy: Take a book, return a book, reading not as commodity exchange but exchange of identity, of ideas.

 

As it happens, such libraries are the subject of Margret Aldrich’s “The Little Free Library Book” (Coffee House: 260 pp., $25), a surprisingly nutritious account. I say surprisingly because this is a gift book, written with the cooperation of Todd Bol, the Wisconsin man who brought the Little Free Library phenomenon into being in 2009. The original plan was to develop 2,510 of them -- or one more than the 2,509 public libraries supported by Andrew Carnegie; six years later, there are more than 25,000 Little Free Libraries worldwide.

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From the Vaults: 'Blade Runner' - Harvard Crimson

From the Vaults: 'Blade Runner'

Harvard Crimson

 

Ridley Scott has had some hits, and he’s had some misses—I don’t think anyone has deliberately watched “G.I. Jane” since 1997—but “Blade Runner” is a masterpiece in a category of its own. Harrison Ford, then in his prime, is Rick Deckard, a bounty hunter who specializes in finding escaped replicants—genetically engineered robots who are human in all but their expiration date. The film is set in the Los Angeles of the future: grungy and smog-ridden, controlled by large domestic and foreign interests. This is not the bright IKEA-sleek future of “2001,” or even the alternating plastic garishness and urban decay of “A Clockwork Orange.” This is a future where everything is dark and dirty, and even at midday the sunlight is sick and yellow. In the financial uncertainty of the late 2000s, this looked a lot more like a real future.

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Reading With Imagination - New York Times (blog)

Reading With Imagination - New York Times (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Literature is a shared experience between the writer and her audience.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at the question "So how should one read?"

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22 Books Women Think Men Should Read - Huffington Post

22 Books Women Think Men Should Read - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Why is it that we don’t think men should read books by and about women? In a canon and culture flooded with the perspectives and stories of men, men have no difficulty finding books that reaffirm their self-images and explore their masculinity. Why aren’t we encouraging men to also read great books that widen their horizons and show them life through the eyes of people unlike them? Reading great books reportedly has the capacity to strengthen our emotional intelligence, empathy, and understanding of others, and investing ourselves in the stories of people we don't easily relate to can only magnify these benefits.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Amidst too many "X [number of] Books Every [something] Should Read," this one is pretty good.

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Rupert Goold, 'True Story' director, on the fictional nature of truth - Washington Times

Rupert Goold, 'True Story' director, on the fictional nature of truth - Washington Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Truth may be stranger than fiction, but when a film goes by the title of “True Story,” it immediately raises the question: How much of what is on-screen is real?

 

“On the surface it feels like a true crime thriller, and in many ways it is,” Mr. Goold said of his film, which opens in the District on Friday. “But I hope it [has] something else to do with friendship and good and evil, and to some extent the media” and how exposure both tantalizes and corrupts, he said.

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The Best Science In Fiction - Forbes

The Best Science In Fiction - Forbes | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A look at some books that capture the feeling of being a scientist.

 

now that I’m a professional scientist, I end up finding a lot of stories about science to be lacking. Not just in the usual “the laws of physics don’t apply” sense, where science is bent to serve the purpose of the story– I’m generally pretty accepting of that, because sticking too strictly to known science dramatically limits your plot options– but in the way fictional science is done. Fictional portrayals of science lean very heavily on tropes like the Lone (Possibly Mad) Genius and other lazy clichés, and because of that, they often fail to ring true because of that.

 

My reading over the last fifteen or twenty years probably skews a bit more toward the fantasy side of the genre as a result, because I’m less likely to be bothered by the implausible behavior of people working with magic.

But there’s rather too much negativity in SF right now, so I want to offer something a little more positive: a list of fictional stories about science that get things mostly right.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at science fiction and fantasy, areas of literature I'm not very familiar with.

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The Function of Criticism at the Present Time – The Los Angeles...

The Function of Criticism at the Present Time – The Los Angeles... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The following essay is part of the Los Angeles Review of Books special series “No Crisis”: a look at the state of critical thinking and writing — literary interpretation, art history, and cultural studies — in the 21st century.
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A long read, with a link to the rest of the series.

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International Literature Festival runs May 16-24 - RTE.ie

International Literature Festival runs May 16-24 - RTE.ie | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Irvine Welsh, John Gray, Anne Enright, Jon Ronson, Peter Carey, Oliver Jeffers, Alexander McCall Smith, Paul Muldoon will be appearing at the International Literature Festival Dublin, from Saturday May 16 to Sunday May 24.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

I'd love to be there!

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The most banned and challenged books of 2014

The most banned and challenged books of 2014 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom today released its annual "Top Ten List of Frequently Challenged Books," based on over 300 reports of community members attempting to have literature removed from libraries and school curricula. The organization notes that "attempts to remove books by authors of color and books with themes about issues concerning communities of color are disproportionately challenged and banned."
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Sherman Alexie's "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" tops the list.

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The Best Literary References on Mad Men - Vulture

The Best Literary References on Mad Men - Vulture | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
"It’s these perfect little details that add a lot to the show."

 

Billy Parrott, managing librarian of the art and picture collections at the Mid-Manhattan Library, has been chronicling the meanings behind some of Mad Men’s most iconic literary references on his blog for the New York Public Library, The Mad Men Reading List, over the past five years. On the U.S.A. reference, Parrott noted, "It's that time period where things change. It was the end of innocence [for] that particular generation." Like the song that bookends this episode, the trilogy is a perfect fit for Mad Men's themes, and as Matt Zoller Seitz points out, an acknowledged influence on the show.

 

Parrott took Vulture through some of the best literary references on the show so far, and what he predicts we might see this season.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

MAD MEN gets a lot of press now that the final several episodes are upon us. Here's a look at the literary angle.

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From Laura Ingalls and Alicia Florrick to Elizabeth II: literary and historical women as role models

From Laura Ingalls and Alicia Florrick to Elizabeth II: literary and historical women as role models | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The more time I spend reading, writing, volunteering at the library, and exploring what I want to do with my life, the more I’ve learned that what I read and who I read about has influenced who I am and who I want to be. While I love Dickens, Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, and Shakespeare, my heart is with Laura Ingalls Wilder, Louisa May Alcott, Lucy M Montgomery, and Jane Austen. Half Pint (Laura), Jo March, Anne Shirley, and Elizabeth Bennett are some of the strongest, imaginative, passionate, and soulful characters in literature – determining their place and path in life while remaining devoted to family, friends, and love. 

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The Great Gatsby's New York City, in ten different scenes, from the Queensboro Bridge to the Plaza Hotel - The Bowery Boys: New York City History

BOWERY BOYS BOOK OF THE MONTH Each month I’ll pick a book — either brand new or old, fiction or non-fiction — that offers an intriguing take on New York City history, something that uses history in a way that’s uniquely unconventional or exposes a...
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Finding The Writer Within: How Young Adult Author Tracy Clark Realized Her Voice- Carson Valley Times

Finding The Writer Within: How Young Adult Author Tracy Clark Realized Her Voice- Carson Valley Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
 by Scott Neuffer I’m sitting in the J.T. on a Wednesday night with a rising star of young adult literature. In the publishing industry, the young adult market, otherwise known as YA, is like the N...
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Metamodern Literature and the Metaverse - Huffington Post

Metamodern Literature and the Metaverse - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The term "metamodernism" first appeared in 1975, in a scholarly article by Mas'ud Zavarzadeh that focused its attention on 1970s domestic politics, a small subset of 1970s metafiction, and the burgeoning "technetronic culture" the...

 

Whatever its manifestation in literature or online, we must concede that the "metaverse" is, at its core, merely a shared falsehood that invigorates rather than enervates, one that permits the simultaneous occupation of a space by persons differently situated who are, in real-time and their honest selves, perhaps incompatible. That romantic love is often described thus says much about the simultaneous optimism and cynicism -- the juxtaposition of romanticism and poststructuralism -- of the metaverse concept and its (still non-exhaustively) theorized consequences.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This is way too meta for me. Maybe you'll understand it more than I do.

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The Greatness of Günter Grass - The New Yorker

The Greatness of Günter Grass - The New Yorker | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
He was the great dancer of German literature, dancing across history’s horrors toward literature’s beauty.

 

I loved him for his writing, of course—for his love of the Grimm tales, which he remade in modern dress, for the black comedy he brought to the examination of history, for the playfulness of his seriousness, for the unforgettable courage with which he looked the great evil of his time in the face and rendered the unspeakable into great art. (Later, when people threw slurs at him—Nazi, anti-Semite—I thought: let the books speak for him, the greatest anti-Nazi masterpieces ever written, containing passages about Germans’ chosen blindness toward the Holocaust that no anti-Semite could ever write.)

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

By Salman Rushdie.

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18 Literary Maps of the United States

18 Literary Maps of the United States | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
RT @mental_floss: 18 Literary Maps of the United States — http://t.co/rTyXd8Zcg9

 

The first United States transcontinental road trip was completed in 1903, and Americans have been enamored with the open road ever since. The only thing more American than a road trip? A literary route celebrating American authors. The Library of Congress’ Language of the Land exhibit collects bookish state maps that chart the regions and the writers who loved them, either through birth or discovery.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Unfortunately, the images here, even the supposedly enlarged ones, are unreadable. And there's no information on how to see the originals or purchase individual state maps. Pretty poor execution, Mental Floss.

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Baileys Women's Prize For Fiction Shortlist Announced - Huffington Post UK

Baileys Women's Prize For Fiction Shortlist Announced - Huffington Post UK | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
For female authors, getting the recognition you deserve in literary circles can be almost impossible.

The majority of literary prizes are dominated by men.
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Stories that shape: What are the best novels about the politics of technology? - The Guardian

Stories that shape: What are the best novels about the politics of technology? - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Georgina Voss: Which fiction books offer us useful and powerful ways to engage with the politics of science and technology?
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Novels used to analyze evil - South Bend Tribune

Novels used to analyze evil - South Bend Tribune | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Evil is a theological and philosophical concept, and because most people have a connection with religion or philosophy, we know what evil looks like.

 

humanity does not possess a mechanism for examining the character traits and behaviors that lead some people to do incredibly evil things, retired University of Notre Dame professor Vera Profit says.


Profit served as a professor of French and German literature, and she used her interest in literature, along with her research into the work of scholars such as Scott Peck, who in his book “People of the Lie” sought to move the concept of evil more firmly into the scientific realm, to write her new book “The Devil Next Door: Toward a Literary and Psychological Definition of Human Evil.”

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Subject wise - a universal choice - Times of India

Subject wise - a universal choice - Times of India | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Here's a look at arts-related postgraduate programmes open to graduates from across streams

The humanities and social sciences have often played a catalytic role in bringing about changes in social realities through the growth and application of knowledge.Subjects such as philosophy, literature, religion, art, music, history, politics and language are essentially interdisciplinary and form the basis of the humanities and social sciences. However, a few arts disciplines have one thing in common -graduates from any stream are eligible to study for a postgraduate degree in these. So, students can take a Master's in one of these subjects even though they may have graduated with a different subject or subject combinations.While applying, one has to be in sync with the respective university's entry criteria, which may include an entrance test.Here are three such options that students can consider.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A plug for interdisciplinary studies.

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Günter Grass, Writer Who Pried Open Germany’s Past but Hid His Own, Dies at 87

Günter Grass, Writer Who Pried Open Germany’s Past but Hid His Own, Dies at 87 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mr. Grass was the novelist, social critic and Nobel Prize winner whom many called his country’s moral conscience but who stunned Europe when he revealed in 2006 that he had been in the Waffen-SS.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Once again, the question arises: Do we judge writers on their works or on their lives?

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Azar Nafisi on Why the Arts and Humanities Are Critical to the American Vision

Azar Nafisi on Why the Arts and Humanities Are Critical to the American Vision | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The author of "Reading Lolita in Tehran" and recipient of a Smithsonian award, discusses why in education art matters as much as science
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A voice of reason in the attacks on the arts in education.

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Poetry, History, and Dime Novels: The Literary Works of the Fuller Sisters

Poetry, History, and Dime Novels: The Literary Works of the Fuller Sisters | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Sisters Frances Auretta and Metta Victoria Fuller both made their mark on the literary world of the 19th century. Frances became well-known for writing history, particularly of the Northwest, while Metta wrote primarily popular fiction, including the newly popular Dime Novels. Although they made their mark writing in different genres, they began their careers in much the same way, writing for local publications in Ohio and for the Home Journal (now Town and Country), founded by Nathaniel Parker Willis and George Morris. By 1848, they had moved to New York City together where they met with immediate success.

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Wolf Hall is the next British cultural invasion - Vox

The themes of heresy, fear, death, and the problems of the powerful are universal, but the story of Wolf Hall is a specific story of one man's place amid all this drama. That's what makes it great.

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Shakespeare Wrote Contested Play, Suggests Psychological Text Analysis - University of Texas at Austin News

Shakespeare Wrote Contested Play, Suggests Psychological Text Analysis - University of Texas at Austin News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
University of Texas at Austin News
Shakespeare Wrote Contested Play, Suggests Psychological Text Analysis

 

“In the last few years, a new array of language analysis tools have surfaced that allow us to identify the personality and identity of authors through their use of some of the smallest and most insignificant words in English,” Pennebaker said.

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