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AD reader spotlight: Life of Pi - Awards Daily (blog)

AD reader spotlight: Life of Pi - Awards Daily (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Ann Arbor News - MLive.com AD reader spotlight: Life of Pi Awards Daily (blog)

 

A film adaption of the Man Booker Prize-winning novel by Yann Martel, Life of Pi offers an introspective take on the mysterious, beautiful nature of life. A marvel of storytelling and visual resplendence, it tells the tale of Piscine Molitor “Pi” Patel, a young, religious teenager who, after a tragic shipwreck, is suddenly thrust into a harrowing journey on a lifeboat in the middle of the Pacific Ocean – a journey replete with spiritual motifs as well as extraordinary (and often dangerous) encounters with nature. Life of Pi is not only a parable for survival and the resilience of the human spirit; it is also a meditation on the mercurial, madcap, but ultimately glorious disposition of life in this universe. It is one of the very best films of 2012.

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This Little Girl's Scrapbook Proves Exactly Why Strong Female Characters Are So Important

This Little Girl's Scrapbook Proves Exactly Why Strong Female Characters Are So Important | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mia has pretty excellent taste if you ask me.
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This photo was retweeted and posted on Facebook all over the place. Here it is again, if you'd like to take a close-up look.

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Heart-stopped: Fiction and the rewards of discomfort - OUPblog (blog)

Heart-stopped: Fiction and the rewards of discomfort - OUPblog (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

One of the ideas my research explores is the belief, in the eighteenth-century, that fiction commands attention by soliciting wonder. Wonder might sound like a nice, calm, placid emotion, but that was not how eighteenth-century century thinkers conceived it. In an essay published in 1795 but probably written in the 1750s, Adam Smith describes wonder as a sentiment induced by a novel object, a sentiment that may be recognized by the wonderstruck subject’s “staring, and sometimes that rolling of the eyes, that suspension of the breath, and that swelling of the heart” (‘The Principles Which Lead and Direct Philosophical Enquiries’). 

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Seeking Inspiration in Jane Austen's World - New York Times

Seeking Inspiration in Jane Austen's World - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A novelist explores the two quiet villages in Hampshire, where the author spent the most creative periods of her short life.
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Literary works given new life in public domain - opensource.com

Literary works given new life in public domain - opensource.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When literary works are licensed in public domain, a new legacy is created from the creativity of new digital representations by fans in the 21st century.
Works in the public domain belong to everyone. Anyone can use public domain works in any manner they wish. They can republish the work as is, or they can use a public domain work as the inspiration and groundwork to create something new and exciting. However, the length of time before a creative works enters the public domain has grown longer and longer in recent decades. In the United States, the Copyright Act of 1976 and the Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998 greatly increased the length of time before a work would enter the public domain. The situation is very similar in other parts of the world.
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Review: Syfy's Event Series 'Ascension' - Yahoo TV (blog)

Review: Syfy's Event Series 'Ascension' - Yahoo TV (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Yahoo TV critic Ken Tucker says Syfy's 'Ascension' blends classic sci-fi premise fitted out with elements of a murder mystery and romance-novel shenanigans.
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The Scale of Female Literary Merit

The Scale of Female Literary Merit | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Titles such as The Lady’s Magazine didn’t only survive by being lucky. Monthly issues were printed with an expectation that subscribers would bind them according to the publisher’s printed instructions and preserve them in bound volume form for posterity. References were made to articles in earlier volumes in expectation that readers would still have them to hand. And there is anecdotal evidence that some magazine readers went to great lengths to preserve their libraries against the ravages of the elements and time, such as the brine soaked, shipwrecked and salvaged copies of The Lady’s Magazine that Charlotte Bronte recalled reading as a child when she should have been paying attention to her lessons and which had once belonged to her mother or aunt (Letter to Hartley Coleridge 10 December 1840).

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13 of the Most Anticipated YA Novels of 2015, aka What You Need to Be ... - Bustle

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13 of the Most Anticipated YA Novels of 2015, aka What You Need to Be ...
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'Teresa, My Love,' Julia Kristeva's Latest Novel - New York Times

'Teresa, My Love,' Julia Kristeva's Latest Novel - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

It is hard, even knowing just a few facts about Teresa of Ávila, not to fall in love with her. . . . 

The French psychoanalyst and literary critic Julia Kristeva has not been immune to the charms of this holy woman. She has put Teresa on the couch before (most recently in “Hatred and Forgiveness”), and in “Teresa, My Love,” she, or rather her alter ego, the clinical psychologist Sylvia Leclercq, analyzes Teresa and her historical, spiritual and sexual significance.

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Discover Dorset’s literary landscape

Discover Dorset’s literary landscape | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
With authors across the centuries finding inspiration around the Dorset coast and countryside, discover the areas they called home and the locations that inspired their work.
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Helen Macdonald: ‘I was feral, I identified with the hawk, took on her character’

Helen Macdonald: ‘I was feral, I identified with the hawk, took on her character’ | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The author who wrote the acclaimed H Is for Hawk, an extraordinary memoir of grief that became the year’s most talked-about work of nonfiction

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How fairytales grew up - The Guardian

How fairytales grew up - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
With Hollywood spending millions on new versions of age-old characters, from Frozen’s Snow Queen to Cinderella, fairytales are more popular than ever.

 

Frozen has become the most successful animated film of all time: Anna and Elsa dolls have overtaken Barbie in sales for the second Christmas running, a jolly seasonal short has been made called “Frozen Fever”, and the studio is assumed to be planning a sequel.

 

It isn’t, of course, the first time a classic fairy story has been seized, disarticulated and recast, its apparently defining elements radically altered. The sequence of twists and variations it has undergone reveals how fairytales respond to social values and needs over time. For instance, female screenwriters and directors, whether working in Hollywood or arthouse cinemas (and taking their cue from women artists and writers), are making a difference. Since the 1960s, criticism has pointed to the lies peddled by stories such as “Beauty and the Beast” – especially the overvaluing of wealth and power invested in the male – and as a result, the generations brought up by grandmothers and mothers who know their Betty Friedan, Angela Carter and Naomi Wolf have brought a new consciousness to the way classic stories are reshaped for the screen.

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PM's Literary Awards ignite fresh history wars - The Saturday Paper

Awarding a PM’s literary prize to a poorly sourced anti-union tome is an unsubtle attempt to rewrite history.

 

Tony Abbott has not had a lot to smile about lately. But on Monday night in the Great Hall of the National Gallery of Victoria, as he prepared to announce the Prime Minister’s Literary Award for history, he wore a big old grin.

 

He went through the motions of envelope opening, but he knew already what the judges’ decision was. The government factotum placed in charge of the judging process had told him weeks ago.

 

The $80,000 prize was to be split between two authors. One who had produced a fine work of academically acceptable history and one who had produced a politically acceptable polemic.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

The latest literary scandal, this one from Australia

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Turkish novelists Orhan Pamuk and Elif Shafak accused of being Western ... - The Guardian

Turkish novelists Orhan Pamuk and Elif Shafak accused of being Western ... - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Reports in pro-government papers say high-profile novelists are part of ‘international literature lobby’ recruited by western powers to attack Turkey’s government
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Do they really think novelists have such power?

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Religious Reading

Religious Reading | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
We took the opportunity to ask a few writers to recommend novels with religious themes, preferably lesser known.
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Don't Write for Awards - The Atlantic

Don't Write for Awards - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
National Book Awards finalist Emily St. John Mandel says pomp and circumstance can derail the everyday work of creating complex, flawed characters.
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51 Of The Most Beautiful Sentences In Literature

51 Of The Most Beautiful Sentences In Literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
"At the still point, there the dance is." —T. S. Eliot
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The Psychology of Reading Affects How – and What – We Read

The Psychology of Reading Affects How – and What – We Read | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Is there some scientific rationale behind our reading habits and predilections? Why, for example, do you sometimes find that you can’t even finish a book that critics and your friends alike say they couldn't stop reading?
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WH Auden's Cheeky Tribute to Sigmund Freud - The New Republic

WH Auden's Cheeky Tribute to Sigmund Freud - The New Republic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The poet explains the lasting influence of the analyst.

 

W.H. Auden is famous for incorporating politics and world events into his poetry, but he was also deeply interested in and influenced by psychoanalysis. Freud’s ideas about the subconscious, the Id, and repression surface throughout Auden’s work, including in the famous “September 1, 1939,” in which Auden refers to mankind as composed “of Eros and of dust.” The British poet even wrote an elegy for Freud, who died the same month Hitler invaded Poland. In this essay, written thirteen years after the poem, Auden’s admiration for the Austrian psychoanalyst continues to shine through: “Psychoanalysts and their patients may sometimes seem funny little people, but the fact that they exist is evidence that society is still partly human.”

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Philip K. Dick would have been 86 today: Some thoughts on his legacy - Los Angeles Times

Philip K. Dick would have been 86 today: Some thoughts on his legacy - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The late Philip K. Dick, born 86 years ago today in Chicago, is something of a cautionary figure in American literature: brilliant, prolific, often sloppy, and woefully underappreciated during his lifetime. It was only with the 1982 release of the film “Blade Runner” (loosely based on his 1968 novel “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?”) that Dick’s work truly began to saturate the mainstream; by that point, he had been dead for four months.

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12 of the Most Anticipated Books of 2015, aka the Titles We Can't Get Our ... - Bustle

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12 of the Most Anticipated Books of 2015, aka the Titles We Can't Get Our ...
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That's because there is a lot to look forward to in literature.
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To start next year's reading off right. . .

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Modern brands are embracing the savage side of fairy tales this Christmas - The Independent

Modern brands are embracing the savage side of fairy tales this Christmas - The Independent | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

As we grow up, we learn that fairy tales, folklore and fantasy stories don’t all end happily ever after, which makes them a surprising source of inspiration for brands that are selling a luxury lifestyle. Wealth, after all, is meant to be the great protector. But it seems there’s an appeal to darker, bewitching tales that, if not inherent or endless, certainly resonates right now.

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Hilary Mantel attacks critics over BBC's Margaret Thatcher story broadcast - The Guardian

Hilary Mantel attacks critics over BBC's Margaret Thatcher story broadcast - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Exclusive: Author makes spirited response to Mail on Sunday after corporation decides to air The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher on Radio 4’s Book at Bedtime

 

The BBC might have anticipated a brouhaha. There was vociferous criticism from Thatcher’s friends and supporters when the Guardian first published The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher – August 6th 1983, in September. The story imagines the killing of the prime minister in London by an IRA sniper, who uses the narrator’s window as a vantage point. It is set four years after Thatcher assumed office in 1979 – a few months before the real-life Brighton bombing that came close to ending her life.

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If You Loved 'Frozen,' Then These 15 Books Must Be On Your Reading List - Bustle

Bustle If You Loved 'Frozen,' Then These 15 Books Must Be On Your Reading List

 

I’ll be honest — when Elsa walked out that palace door letting it all go into the great snowy unknown, I had flashbacks to my earliest awareness of feminism (a T-shirt inherited from my mother emblazoned with the words “Women belong in the house… and the Senate”). And, after a recent, and deeply disturbing, encounter with some of my childhood Disney favorites (re-watch Peter Pan, I dare you), it feels good to fall so hard for a princess that brings new meaning — and some much needed nuance — to the idea of girl power.

 

So, if you feel a strong and unyielding connection with the modern snow queen, or even just a deep and abiding love for sentient snowmen, why not bring a little more of the snowy, sisterly, sweet, smart, strong Frozen fun into your life?

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A good companion piece to the one that follows here. . .

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Now We Are Rome - The Awl

Now We Are Rome - The Awl | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Ancient Roman torture on film, and modern American torture in the news.

 

Hollywood has a long history of using the Romans to comment, often simplistically, about America. Traditionally, one aspect that has been presented in film as incompatible with American ideals is torture. It was always the purview of the brute, barbarian, and tyrant– the activity of a cruel, pre-Christian era. When characters from antiquity resorted to torture, the filmmakers consistently made the point that coercive violence was historically irreconcilable with a modern, enlightened democracy.

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Four political dramas that play around with form - Los Angeles Times

Four political dramas that play around with form - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The words "political drama" may evoke finger-pointing lectures to some, but the subtlest works of dramatic literature have a political dimension, and the most enduring political dramas have an artistic suppleness.


A false dichotomy between aesthetics and politics persists nonetheless. It bears reminding in this intensely polarized era that "political" is not the same as "ideological" and that an interest in power relations, economic divides and injustice is hardly proof of a programmatic imagination.

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From the Los Angeles Times

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