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Does Creativity Come With A Price? New Insight On Creatives And Mental Illness - Fast Company

Does Creativity Come With A Price? New Insight On Creatives And Mental Illness - Fast Company | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Fast Company Does Creativity Come With A Price?

 

This fall, the first statistically significant study linking creativity and mental illness was published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research. “Mental Illness, Suicide, And Creativity: 40-Year Prospective Total Population Study,” examined 1.2 million Swedish patients from the country’s national registry and compared this sample against the entire Swedish population.

 

Here’s what they found:

 

Overall, creative professionals were about 8% more likely to suffer from bipolar disorder than the general population. The study found this to be true for artists (practitioners of everything from photography to choreography) and scientists (professors and researchers). The most startling results, however, related to authors. Writers were a whopping 121% more likely to suffer from bipolar disorder than the general population. Moreover, Simon Kyaga, the study’s lead researcher, says that authors had a “statistically significant increase” in anxiety disorders--38% to be exact. Rates of alcoholism, drug addiction, and suicide also increased among writers.

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20 Forgotten, Overlooked Classics By Women Writers Everyone Should Read - Bustle

20 Forgotten, Overlooked Classics By Women Writers Everyone Should Read
Bustle

 

The novels on the following list might not have the recognition of the old standby classics, but they certainly share the same type of bold originality, unforgettable characters, lyrical writing, and important social messages inherent in some of our most revered literary works. Unfortunately the publishing world has been as notoriously late to the diversity party as it has been to the gender-equalization celebration, which means that there are loads of incredibly talented women writers whose work has been passed by and pooh-poohed for centuries.

 

So get ready to be amazed, enlightened, inspired, and educated by these forgotten and overlooked masterpieces by women writers. Reading them will change you, just like a true literary classic should.


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Famed literary boat getting $2M makeover in Port Townsend - KOMO News

Famed literary boat getting $2M makeover in Port Townsend - KOMO News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Famous authors can make their boats famous too: Hemingway, Darwin, Cousteau, even Humphrey Bogart. Famous boats often fall into disrepair before a resurrection.

 

Such is the case in Port Townsend, where they are getting started on a $2 million restoration of "The Western Flyer" on which John Steinbeck wrote "The Log of the Sea of Cortez."

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A Story That Could Only Be Told Online - The Atlantic

A Story That Could Only Be Told Online - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Homestuck is one elaborate, self-referencing inside joke collapsed in a truly digital narrative.

 

But then he created Homestuck, and with it, a new kind of storytelling on the web. Homestuck tells the story of a group of online friends who start playing a video game that both dooms their world and creates a new one. From a narrative standpoint, Homestuck has roots in participatory stories like Choose Your Own Adventure and early role-playing games. But as Hussie’s legions of fans would see—the site regularly sees upwards of 1 million unique visitors a day—Homestuck was and is something different.

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Ben Lerner, 10:04 & The Death Of “Silence” - The Quietus

Ben Lerner, 10:04 & The Death Of “Silence” - The Quietus | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Tom Evans considers the concept of silence, the relationship between artist and audience — author and reader — and the notion of collectivity, through the lens of Ben Lerner's 10:04.

 

The epigraph of the novel, taken from Walter Benjamin, is a Hasidic parable of how the world to come will be just like this one, only a little different. Totaled art; scarcity of goods during a crisis; Donald Judd sculptures seen against a desert backdrop rather than the white wall of a Manhattan gallery: all involve slight perceptual modifications. The novel is all about delicate shifts. Alien context, Lerner implies, entails greater proprioceptivity. And the inevitable question arises: what other kinds of perceptual shifts might there be and what socio-economic implications might they have?

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‘My solution to depression was never medical. What ultimately helped me was time’

‘My solution to depression was never medical. What ultimately helped me was time’ | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Novelist Matt Haig on family, writing and his recovery from depression
• Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig – extract
Why did it take you 15 years to get the courage to write about depression?
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The Case of Georges Simenon - New York Times

The Case of Georges Simenon - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

In many ways, the Maigrets were a sort of comfort food — the books that Simenon wrote to recover from the physical and psychological stress of writing his better, and far less comforting, novels. In these non-Maigret “thrillers,” often referred to as the romans durs (but to most aficionados known simply as the “Simenons”), the central, usually male character is lured from the stultifying cocoon of himself — and his suburban, oppressively Francophile (and often mother-dominated) life — into a wider, vertiginous world of sexual and philosophical peril, where violence, whether it occurs or only threatens to occur, feels like too much freedom coming at a guy far more quickly than he can handle.

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Reading Addict: The Scientific Effects Of A Damn Good Book On Your Brain

Reading Addict: The Scientific Effects Of A Damn Good Book On Your Brain | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
This is your brain; this is your brain on books.

Via Sharon Bakar
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Han Solo Shot First - The Atlantic

Han Solo Shot First - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The surprising significance of past tense, present tense, and everything in between on Wikipedia
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Words used in Chinese books illuminate how a nation's values changed during ... - Phys.Org

Words used in Chinese books illuminate how a nation's values changed during ... - Phys.Org | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
As China has undergone rapid economic and social change in recent decades, an increase of individualistic values has been reflected in the word choices of Chinese authors.
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Alexander McCall Smith writes about what he admires in others - gulfnews.com

“People say why I don’t write about the distress of the world...I find that odd. I write about what I admire in others,” says the Edinburgh-based writer.

. . .

Calling it one of his favourite recent projects, McCall Smith says, “I enjoyed rewriting Emma. I am happy with the result; I stuck fairly closely to the original plot but gave my particular view of it. Emma, who is what we might describe today as a real little madam, has to come to terms with social and psychological reality, but at the end of the day she survives the difficulties that she creates for herself. She finds happiness within the rules even if she has railed against them.”

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Always Already Alienated

Always Already Alienated | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Ben Lerner and the novel of detachment.

 

Lerner is the leading practitioner of the novel of detachment—an ascendant genre in contemporary American letters. What is the novel of detachment? . . . the novel of detachment’s sense of grief or loss is free-floating and general—as untouched by history as it is by present-day affairs either foreign or domestic. The protagonist of a novel of detachment is distinguished from his forerunners in part by his isolation from—and cynicism about—any human community or politics. The achievement of a perspective governed by impersonality and distance . . . is the novel of detachment’s fate, if not always its aspiration. From there, at least, it is presumed that we may look gaily down on the modern world, acknowledging its fraudulence and corruption right alongside our own.

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F.E.W. Harper: the case of a forgotten black woman writer

F.E.W. Harper: the case of a forgotten black woman writer | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
At the dawn of the twentieth century, the greatest black woman writer was Frances Ellen Watkins Harper. Yes, exactly.  Who?  And that’s the shame of it.  Anything can make such a seismic shift in o...
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The paradox of popping back in time - BBC News

The paradox of popping back in time - BBC News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Time travel often appears in the movies, From www.bbc.com - February 16, 9:10 A


Here we go again. The movie Predestination, released in the UK this week, is the very latest in the long history of time travel films. There’s been more than 100 since the Terminator and Back to the Future franchises began 30 years ago – all of which are science fiction that have little to do with the science facts.

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20 Female Harlem Renaissance Writers You Should Know

20 Female Harlem Renaissance Writers You Should Know | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
I'll keep this brief: we know too little about the women of the Harlem Renaissance. The more I look into these poets, writers, dramatists, essayists, critics, social critics, young adult writers, a...
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The Rodney Dangerfield of Literature - Daily Beast

The Rodney Dangerfield of Literature - Daily Beast | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
With 36 excellent books—novels, poems, memoir, even food writing—under his belt, Jim Harrison ought to be a literary superstar known to all. But we do not live in a just world.
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Why reading and writing on paper can be better for your brain

Why reading and writing on paper can be better for your brain | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Some tests show that reading from a hard copy allows better concentration, while taking longhand notes versus typing onto laptops increases conceptual understanding and retention
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Why James Baldwin's FBI File Was 1,884 Pages

Why James Baldwin's FBI File Was 1,884 Pages | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
William J. Maxwell's provocative F.B. Eyes: How J Edgar Hoover's Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature probes the FBI’s “institutionalized fascination” with black authors like Langston Hughes and Amiri Baraka. Here, Maxwell delves into the FBI's dossier on James Baldwin--at 1,884 pages, it was the largest one on file--and the unlikely FBI literary criticism that emerged from studying Baldwin's books.
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Better Than Gone Girl: CE Poverman's Love by Drowning - Huffington Post

Better Than Gone Girl: CE Poverman's Love by Drowning - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

I am not lying when I say this book is better than Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. Poverman gives us a situation and set of characters as mysterious and intriguing as Flynn does, he surprises us just as much, and we are as riveted to the author's slow unraveling of the main players' psychologies. We keep reading Love by Drowning because ultimately we must know about Davis and Lee Anne. We are as defenseless against their allure as is Val, and we will read on till we've been given the scenes with which to make sense of their tangled and dangerous triangle. But a difference between this book and Flynn's is Poverman invents characters we actually care about. The man and woman whose points-of-view we alternate between in Flynn's book are both so unlikable, it was difficult for me to keep reading.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

I loved "Gone Girl," and I don't agree with this reviewer's dislike of unlikable characters. Nonetheless, the book she reviews here does sound good.

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Reviews: 'Crazy Love You' and 4 more mysteries - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Reviews: 'Crazy Love You' and 4 more mysteries - Minneapolis Star Tribune | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

If you ask me, William Faulkner’s Nobel acceptance speech is one of the finest tributes to the enduring power of literature. In it, Faulkner insisted on a return to “the old verities” —“love and honor, pity and pride, sacrifice and compassion.” Otherwise, he said, a work is “not of the heart but of the glands.” If you ask me, a little of both is good for the soul. The mysteries I’m recommending below engage us with Faulkner’s truths with the bonus of an adrenalin rush.

 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A clever way of framing reviews of 5 debut mystery novels--and some good recommendations for us mystery lovers.

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Richard Price Has a Big Appetite for the Grey Areas Where Good Stories Live - Daily Beast

Richard Price Has a Big Appetite for the Grey Areas Where Good Stories Live - Daily Beast | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The author of ‘The Whites’ and ‘Clockers’ talks about genre fiction, about hitting the street for research, and about the details that can bring a story alive.
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The long read: How the First World War changed English poetry - The National

The long read: How the First World War changed English poetry - The National | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The soldier-poets of the First World War redefined English verse, turning the traumas of the trenches into timeless literature – and the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have created soldier-poets of their own.
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8 Reasons You Should Reread 'Little Women' As An Adult, Because You'll Feel It So Much More Now - Bustle

Bustle
8 Reasons You Should Reread 'Little Women' As An Adult, Because You'll Feel It So Much More Now

 

My Little Women obsession has leaked into just about every facet of my life. Not only did I read and reread the book too many times to count, I also read the sequels, watched the 1994 movie, and obsessively memorized the entire musical, subsequently using the songs during every audition I went on for a year. (Which I HIGHLY RECOMMEND, by the way; The soundtrack will make you cry many tears.) I had no specific reasons for why I was so drawn to it as a kid aside from the fact that I had two sisters of my own, but unconsciously, I realize now, it was soothing all the uncertainties I had about my own future, and basically introducing me to some of the best feminist characters childhood literature had to offer. 

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How Writing Fiction Masters Fear - The Atlantic

How Writing Fiction Masters Fear - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When novelist Harriet Lane received a serious diagnosis, she started telling stories that let her meet anxiety on her own terms.

 

In my everyday life I have no control, really: who does? But on paper, I hold all the cards. Fiction provides you with a way to shape a world, to exert the kind of power and agency our real lives so often lack. I seem to be drawn to characters— duplicitous or manipulative characters—who specialize in this sort of thing. Frances in Alys, Always and Nina in Her are both extremely skilled at shaping the world around them, and getting what they want from it. Nina’s whole life is about that control.

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My Back Pages: Reading is Discovering - KQED

My Back Pages: Reading is Discovering - KQED | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
There's nothing quite like the joy of discovering that a new favorite author has a deep back catalog; we take a look at nine authors with plenty of rewarding titles under their belts.
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Why the British Are Better at Satire - The Atlantic

Why the British Are Better at Satire - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Political mockery thrives on a more cynical spirit than Veep and the American House of Cards can muster.

 

viewers looking for political fare with a real comic edge have had nowhere to go but HBO’s Veep, an Americanized variation of the British series The Thick of It imported to our shores by the original’s creator, the Scotsman Armando Iannucci. What is it that the Brits understand about this enterprise that we Americans don’t?

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