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One big fiction, read and written by us all - The Guardian

One big fiction, read and written by us all - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The Guardian One big fiction, read and written by us all

 

While critics carped at the fragmented, non-linear nature of the text, in hindsight 253 was the high point of early networked fiction, which is now finding expression on smartphones and tablets. The newly released iPhone and iPad app The Silent History collects case histories of a future epidemic of speechlessness, in the form of a serial novel released one day at a time. Each short episode is designed to be absorbed in 15 minutes and some of the stories are tied to particular locations: the reader stands within 10 metres of a dot on the map in order to unlock the section. In another echo of Ryman, who invited submissions from readers to continue the story, readers can submit their own stories to the Silent History world.

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15 Things Only Contemporary Literature Lovers Know, Other Than The Fact That Rules Don't Matter - Bustle

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15 Things Only Contemporary Literature Lovers Know, Other Than The Fact That ...
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I was a latecomer when it came to loving contemporary literature.
And then, in a graduate creative writing class, a fellow student introduced me to Lorrie Moore. Boom. Doors flew open. Her story “Two Boys” — which deals with sex, gender roles, depression, and melancholy — was like nothing I’d read before. Her mix of breathtaking poetic language and a conversational tone were raw and accessible. The intelligent, self-aware protagonist helped me find liberation from the dead white guys of my past. Suddenly, I felt as if writing was something I could do, as if my opinion mattered.
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A Tourist In One's Own Country: An interview With Simon Sylvester - The Quietus

A Tourist In One's Own Country: An interview With Simon Sylvester - The Quietus | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
It would be hard to resent Simon Sylvester, an affable thirty-four year old who seems almost apologetic that his first novel won the prestigious 2014 Guardian Not the Booker prize. Besides being an edgy supernatural “whatdunnit” about mysterious disappearances on a remote Scottish island, The Visitors is also a meditation on myth, storytelling, growing up, the misery of love, and the act of writing itself – weaving folklore tales about the siren-like “selkies” (seal-people) that ensnare human souls with a nuanced Bildungsroman.
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Experts examine bones as Spain hunts for Cervantes' remains

Experts examine bones as Spain hunts for Cervantes' remains | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Forensic experts began excavating graves and examining bones Saturday in a tiny chapel in Madrid, hoping to solve the centuries-old mystery of exactly where the great Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes was laid to rest.

The author of "Don Quixote" was buried in 1616 at the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians in Madrid's historic Barrio de las Letras, or Literary Quarter, but the exact whereabouts of his grave within the convent chapel are unknown.
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Canadian Literature Bingo

Canadian Literature Bingo | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Suggestions for filling your Canadian Literature bingo card.

Via Sharon Bakar
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, January 25, 8:58 PM

A fun way to read more Canadian fiction, with some nice reading pathway suggestions for greats such as Alice Munro and Margaret Atwood.

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11 Wonderfully Quirky Books for Readers Who Like Their Lit A Little Out Of The ... - Bustle

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Lucky for you, Miranda July isn’t the only author breaking the conventional narrative mould in favor of more daring storytelling. From an epic quest to move a couch to a riveting novel about boredom, these books all have one thing in common: they’re slightly off-kilter in the best possible way. Whether this describes you, too, or you just like to give your sanity a night off once in a while, curl up with one of these quirky reads for a guaranteed good time.

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Bloggers are destroying Nigerian literature – Toni Kan - Daily Trust

Bloggers are destroying Nigerian literature – Toni Kan - Daily Trust | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Toni Kan is a famous writer who began his career writing for a popular romance fiction magazine. He opened up about his formative years, his new projects, becoming a novelist and what he thinks about Nigerian bloggers, among other issues.
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National Readathon Day: 10 classic and contemporary quick reads - The Guardian

National Readathon Day: 10 classic and contemporary quick reads - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
National Readathon Day, which aims to promote literacy, takes places across the US on Saturday from midday to 4pm. Here are works that could be read from start to finish in that time
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Literary double act: Anne Buist and Graeme Simsion - The Age

Literary double act: Anne Buist and Graeme Simsion - The Age | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Anne Buist and Graeme Simsion are Australia's hottest literary couple, spurring on each other to keep the words - and surprises - coming.

 

Anne Buist is showing signs of nerves - and it's all because of her husband, Graeme Simsion. The prominent Melbourne perinatal psychiatrist, who has written a psychological thriller, Medea's Curse, published next week, says that Simsion, author of the 2013 best-seller, The Rosie Project, sometimes threatens to write a psychological thriller himself.

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Discovering literary life in the North before Seamus Heaney - Irish Times

Discovering literary life in the North before Seamus Heaney - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
James Doyle’s Turnpike Press is championing forgotten writers such as Shan Bullock, Janet McNeill and St John Ervine

 

Many years later I came across a plaque commemorating a writer called Shan Bullock in the grounds of a Fermanagh hotel. I was intrigued by this evidence that there had been a novelist living within a few miles of where I grew up a century before and, after reading his work, I founded a small publisher, called Turnpike Books, to publish new editions of this forgotten writer and to build a series of books that will showcase other, undeservedly, forgotten writers from the north.


Northern writers made their own contribution to the Irish literary revival while depicting the northern character, its stony pride and austere self-reliance, as distinct from that of the “Irish”.

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Diving Deep Into the Other Worlds of Japan's Most Famous Living Writer - PopMatters

Diving Deep Into the Other Worlds of Japan's Most Famous Living Writer - PopMatters | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Haruki Murakami is famous for his magical worlds rich in issues of identity and psychology. Strecher's book is the road map to understand the twisting, metaphysical 'Over There' of Murakami.

 

Perennially snubbed for literature’s brass ring, the Nobel Prize, Haruki Murakami nevertheless is regarded as one of the finest living writers. For many Westerners, Murakami is their first contact with Japanese literature. And that’s quite interesting, considering the author’s conflicted, maverick-esque status in Japanese letters, and his lack of willingness to fit in and play by established rules.

 

Matthew Carl Strecher, professor and Murakami devotee, has much to say about this tension in his latest work, The Forbidden Worlds of Haruki Murakami. Strecher neatly maps out the impression the young Murakami made on the hidebound world of Japanese literature

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10 Public Domain Characters That Are Overdue For A Reboot - io9

10 Public Domain Characters That Are Overdue For A Reboot - io9 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Some older fictional characters turn up again and again and again: Count Dracula and his foes, Victor Frankenstein, Dorothy Gale and the denizens of Oz.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This was educational for me, since I'd never heard of any of them.

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James Patterson's Disappearing Book: Sales Gimmick Or Future Plot Device? - Huffington Post

James Patterson's Disappearing Book: Sales Gimmick Or Future Plot Device? - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Such unconventional works may subvert our understanding of literature (and, in Gaiman's case, of authorship). Literary works that create moods and consider context rather than encouraging page-turning aren't exactly hash-taggable, nor should they be. But, in theory, stories with immersive plots could be transformed into cultural events when given a specific time peg. In Mitchell's case, the steady stream of tweets kept readers hooked. In Patterson's, the uneasiness that comes with potentially never knowing the book's conclusion is an incentive.

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Indian Novelist Reaches Finals of Top American Literary Award - NDTV

Indian Novelist Reaches Finals of Top American Literary Award - NDTV | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
An India-born novelist has been named among the finalists for one of the most prestigious American literary awards for his work about the culture of computer programming and classical Indian aesthetics.
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Does Fiction Need to Become Less ... Fictional? - Newsweek

Newsweek
Does Fiction Need to Become Less ... Fictional?
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Lots on the literary horizon for spring - Philly.com

Lots on the literary horizon for spring - Philly.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
They say the book is declining. But reading isn't. And anyone who loves reading is going to have a really good time this spring. From the Mafia to the Wright Brothers, from punk rock to Alfred Hitchcock to hawks to the cosmos, nonfiction offerings in the next six months will satisfy any hungry mind. And the season's imaginative fiction just teems, with great mysteries, Gothic novels, and new work from Toni Morrison, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Jane Smiley.
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Eye on Fiction - Where the wild things are | The Psychologist

Eye on Fiction - Where the wild things are | The Psychologist | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

According to the writer Francis Spufford, Where the Wild Things Are is ‘one of the very few picture books to make an entirely deliberate, and beautiful, use of the psychoanalytic story of anger’ (Spufford, 2003, p.60). For me, this book and Maurice Sendak’s other works are fascinating studies of intense emotions – disappointment, fury, even cannibalistic rage – and their transformation through creative activity. 

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Broadchurch is not alone in getting people's jobs wrong - Telegraph.co.uk

Broadchurch is not alone in getting people's jobs wrong - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Screen errors are endless when it comes to doctors, nurses, lawyers, forensic scientists – even women’s handbags
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

OK, so it's not exactly about literature. But don't you sometimes fume when a character on TV or in the movies does or says something that is obviously incorrect for the context? I know I do.

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10 Virginia Woolf Quotes That Show Us Why She's Still a Literary Boss - Bustle

Bustle 10 Virginia Woolf Quotes That Show Us Why She's Still a Literary Boss Bustle There is nothing that I wouldn't want to talk with Virginia Woolf about, from the suffragette movement to literary criticism to what it was like to have William...
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'When Books Went to War,' by Molly Guptill Manning - New York Times

'When Books Went to War,' by Molly Guptill Manning - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In World War II, books helped lift the spirits of the troops

 

“From the Airborne Infantry of the front lines to the chair-borne Finance Corps of the rear,” an American soldier observed from an English hospital in the midst of World War II, “you can find the boys reading as they never have before.” He was referring to the ubiquitous presence, among troops stationed abroad, of Armed Services Editions, or A.S.E.s: disposable pocket-size paperback reprints of a wide range of current and classic titles paid for by the United States government and produced by a consortium of the nation’s publishers. The editions, as the soldier’s remark suggests, met the demand for print among American military personnel overseas while opening up possibilities for greater consumption of books in the postwar period.

 

In “When Books Went to War,” Molly Guptill Manning recounts the story of A.S.E.s.

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Sappho's New Poems: The Tangled Tale of Their Discovery - Live Science

Sappho's New Poems: The Tangled Tale of Their Discovery - Live Science | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When two, never-before seen poems by Sappho emerged last year, not all classicists rejoiced at the rare discovery.

 

Widely admired and studied in antiquity, Sappho was known as "the Tenth Muse," and her poetry was collected into nine books at the Library of Alexandria. But today, most of her first-person descriptions of erotic love and longing are read in tantalizing bits and pieces. Take the famous Fragment 130 (it's telling that Sappho's poems are labeled as numbered fragments in most 20th century translations), which reads in its entirety: "Once again Love, the loosener of limbs, shakes me, that sweet-bitter irresistible creature."

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What I learned from a year of fiction - The Christian Century (blog)

What I learned from a year of fiction - The Christian Century (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Like a lot of my preacher friends, I typically read nonfiction, theology, and fiction classics. So, it was a little different for me to delve into the world of hot-off-the-press page-turners. I did it for a year. This is what I learned:

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

interesting insights.

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From Lazarus Long To Capt. Jack Harkness: Bisexuality In Science Fiction - io9

From Lazarus Long To Capt. Jack Harkness: Bisexuality In Science Fiction - io9 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Why were there so many bisexual heroes in the 1970s (including Robert A. Heinlein's Lazarus Long), and was bisexuality viewed as "futuristic"?
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Archie and the Unexpected Virtue of Forgetfulness - The Atlantic

Archie and the Unexpected Virtue of Forgetfulness - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
What the classic comic's lack of continuity says about the increasingly serialized nature of storytelling

 

Beaty's monograph focuses on the Archie comics of the 1960s—roughly the period during which the comics cost 12 cents. The book is divided into 100 different self-contained sections—and as that form suggests, one thematic point Beaty keeps returning to is the startling lack of continuity in Archie. But that non-continuity goes beyond the simple fact of self-contained stories. Reality in the comic is actively inconsistent—what happens in one episode has no bearing on what happens in the next. At the end of a story, everything that occurred is utterly forgotten, erased, and reset.

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About ""Twelve Cent Archie" by Bart Beaty

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The strange and brilliant fiction of Hilary Mantel

The strange and brilliant fiction of Hilary Mantel | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mantel was writing novels for decades before her literary stardom – all of which display her dark wit and stylistic skill. What are her major works beyond the Cromwell bestsellers? As the BBC’s Wolf Hall hits our screens, John Mullan uncovers her career

Via Sharon Bakar
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Robert Stone, Out of the Sixties - The New Yorker

Robert Stone, Out of the Sixties - The New Yorker | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The novelist, who died January 10th, once described his subject as “America and Americans.” He could have added, “going to pieces.”

 

Numerous sentences from the novels of Robert Stone are permanently lodged in my mind. I didn’t sit down to memorize them—they’ve stayed with me because Stone, who died last week at the age of seventy-seven, had the power of being memorable. He wrote vividly and idiosyncratically about things that mattered, in a voice that occupied a high-low register of his own invention. He posed a slightly formal diction in ironic juxtaposition to gritty subject matter: war, drugs, poverty, madness, moral disequilibrium, betrayal—varieties of human folly set against epic backgrounds. In literature and life, he pushed his inclinations to their limit.

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