Literature & Psyc...
Follow
6.7K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
onto Literature & Psychology
Scoop.it!

Nature, environment and a sense of place in fiction

Nature, environment and a sense of place in fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

To literary critic Scott Russell Sanders contemporary fiction "seems barren in part because it draws such tiny, cautious circles, in part because it pretends that nothing lies behind its timid boundaries. Such fiction treats some 'little human morality play' as the whole of reality and never turns outward to acknowledge the 'wilderness raging round.'" When we enter a new novel, Sanders says, we generally enter a room––a kitchen, bedroom, barroom, office––where characters talk. Absent, as much by innocent oversight as by choice, are the non-human contexts acting as forces on the events in the rooms. However "realistic" such fiction pretends to be, it is, Sanders says, "profoundly false, and therefore pathological." (See Michigan Quarterly Review, Fall, 1987).

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Literature & Psychology
interdisciplinary explorations
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Good Video Games Are As Meaningful As Literature And Cinema - Tech Times

Good Video Games Are As Meaningful As Literature And Cinema - Tech Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A new study shows that video games with a good story offer just as much – if not more – meaningful entertainment value than books, plays and movies.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Apparently a good story is a good story, no matter what the medium.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

My Top 5 Favorite Quotes from Psychological Thrillers - moviepilot.com

My Top 5 Favorite Quotes from Psychological Thrillers - moviepilot.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Psychological thrillers are easily one of my favorite genres. They all have some fantastic twists and turns, and incredible jaw-dropping scenes. But they also have some great lines in them, and it's really no surprise. This list today is compiled, not the buildup or the gimmicks, but only by the lines and how they were delivered.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Junot Díaz: 'Read more rebelliously' - Brooklyn Daily Eagle

Junot Díaz: 'Read more rebelliously' - Brooklyn Daily Eagle | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Junot Díaz: ‘Read more rebelliously’

 

Díaz, whose 2007 novel “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” was recently named the best novel of the 21st century to date by BBC Culture, was visiting St. Francis College as the latest speaker in the school’s Walt Whitman Writers Series.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Bizarre, Complicated Formula for Literary Fame - The New Yorker

The Bizarre, Complicated Formula for Literary Fame - The New Yorker | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
William Wordsworth died a hundred and sixty-five years ago next week, on April 23, 1850. Why is he still so famous?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Learn how to write creative fiction, short stories, memoirs, and novels | The Enneagram’s Nine Personalities in Literature

Learn how to write creative fiction, short stories, memoirs, and novels | The Enneagram’s Nine Personalities in Literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
RT @gioclair: Building characters with the Enneagram: examples in literature: http://t.co/BYEqXk8FeG
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An interesting approach to literary characters, although this may be more than you wanted to know.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Dancing into Anna Karenina's mind - The Globe and Mail

Dancing into Anna Karenina's mind - The Globe and Mail | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Russia’s Eifman Ballet adaptation of Tolstoy’s great novel, now touring in Canada, seeks to ‘psychoanalyze’ its heroine rather than reproduce its plot
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Literary democracy in action: 'The Little Free Library Book'

Literary democracy in action: 'The Little Free Library Book' | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
I’m a sucker for a Little Free Library . It is, to me, an almost perfect expression of literary democracy: Take a book, return a book, reading not as commodity exchange but exchange of identity, of ideas.

 

As it happens, such libraries are the subject of Margret Aldrich’s “The Little Free Library Book” (Coffee House: 260 pp., $25), a surprisingly nutritious account. I say surprisingly because this is a gift book, written with the cooperation of Todd Bol, the Wisconsin man who brought the Little Free Library phenomenon into being in 2009. The original plan was to develop 2,510 of them -- or one more than the 2,509 public libraries supported by Andrew Carnegie; six years later, there are more than 25,000 Little Free Libraries worldwide.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

From the Vaults: 'Blade Runner' - Harvard Crimson

From the Vaults: 'Blade Runner'

Harvard Crimson

 

Ridley Scott has had some hits, and he’s had some misses—I don’t think anyone has deliberately watched “G.I. Jane” since 1997—but “Blade Runner” is a masterpiece in a category of its own. Harrison Ford, then in his prime, is Rick Deckard, a bounty hunter who specializes in finding escaped replicants—genetically engineered robots who are human in all but their expiration date. The film is set in the Los Angeles of the future: grungy and smog-ridden, controlled by large domestic and foreign interests. This is not the bright IKEA-sleek future of “2001,” or even the alternating plastic garishness and urban decay of “A Clockwork Orange.” This is a future where everything is dark and dirty, and even at midday the sunlight is sick and yellow. In the financial uncertainty of the late 2000s, this looked a lot more like a real future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Reading With Imagination - New York Times (blog)

Reading With Imagination - New York Times (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Literature is a shared experience between the writer and her audience.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at the question "So how should one read?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

22 Books Women Think Men Should Read - Huffington Post

22 Books Women Think Men Should Read - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Why is it that we don’t think men should read books by and about women? In a canon and culture flooded with the perspectives and stories of men, men have no difficulty finding books that reaffirm their self-images and explore their masculinity. Why aren’t we encouraging men to also read great books that widen their horizons and show them life through the eyes of people unlike them? Reading great books reportedly has the capacity to strengthen our emotional intelligence, empathy, and understanding of others, and investing ourselves in the stories of people we don't easily relate to can only magnify these benefits.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Amidst too many "X [number of] Books Every [something] Should Read," this one is pretty good.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Rupert Goold, 'True Story' director, on the fictional nature of truth - Washington Times

Rupert Goold, 'True Story' director, on the fictional nature of truth - Washington Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Truth may be stranger than fiction, but when a film goes by the title of “True Story,” it immediately raises the question: How much of what is on-screen is real?

 

“On the surface it feels like a true crime thriller, and in many ways it is,” Mr. Goold said of his film, which opens in the District on Friday. “But I hope it [has] something else to do with friendship and good and evil, and to some extent the media” and how exposure both tantalizes and corrupts, he said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Best Science In Fiction - Forbes

The Best Science In Fiction - Forbes | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A look at some books that capture the feeling of being a scientist.

 

now that I’m a professional scientist, I end up finding a lot of stories about science to be lacking. Not just in the usual “the laws of physics don’t apply” sense, where science is bent to serve the purpose of the story– I’m generally pretty accepting of that, because sticking too strictly to known science dramatically limits your plot options– but in the way fictional science is done. Fictional portrayals of science lean very heavily on tropes like the Lone (Possibly Mad) Genius and other lazy clichés, and because of that, they often fail to ring true because of that.

 

My reading over the last fifteen or twenty years probably skews a bit more toward the fantasy side of the genre as a result, because I’m less likely to be bothered by the implausible behavior of people working with magic.

But there’s rather too much negativity in SF right now, so I want to offer something a little more positive: a list of fictional stories about science that get things mostly right.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A look at science fiction and fantasy, areas of literature I'm not very familiar with.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Function of Criticism at the Present Time – The Los Angeles...

The Function of Criticism at the Present Time – The Los Angeles... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The following essay is part of the Los Angeles Review of Books special series “No Crisis”: a look at the state of critical thinking and writing — literary interpretation, art history, and cultural studies — in the 21st century.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A long read, with a link to the rest of the series.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

As if Men Had a Monopoly on Murder: In Search of the Female Gus Fring - The Mary Sue

As if Men Had a Monopoly on Murder: In Search of the Female Gus Fring - The Mary Sue | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Perhaps no cultural phenomenon has generated more thinkpieces than the modern television antihero. Some of these have focused on the trend itself, and its roots
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Women can be antiheroes, too.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Time 100 adds Haruki Murakami to list of world's most influential figures - The Guardian

Time 100 adds Haruki Murakami to list of world's most influential figures - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Japanese novelist is joined by Nigeria’s Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in famous ranking of the people ‘shaping the future’
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Literary Idol: Amelia Gray on Shirley Jackson - Los Angeles Times

Literary Idol: Amelia Gray on Shirley Jackson - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Literature is a lonely art, but writers keep company with the heroes on their bookshelves. We asked five Festival of Books participants to pay tribute to authors who inspired them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Stacks: William Styron was Lits Big Game Hunter - Daily Beast

The Stacks: William Styron was Lits Big Game Hunter - Daily Beast | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A white southerner by birth, Styron scorned the label of regional author—the world was his territory and the bigger the subject the better, from American slavery to the Holocaust.

 

When Philip Caputo went to profile William Styron for Esquire in the mid-’80s, the two men had something to talk about other than writing—they were both Marines. Ultimately, though, writing occupied the heart of their discussion. Styron, author of the well-loved novels Lie Down in Darkness, The Confessions of Nat Turner, and Sophie’s Choice, was then working on a novel about World War II called The Way of the Warrior. He was notorious for long gaps between books and this one was turning out to be no different. But this one he never finished. The story you’re about to read is interrupted halfway through by Styron’s hospitalization for depression. A few years later, Styron instead published a fascinating account of his disease, Darkness Visible, a slim volume remarkable for its honesty and concision. Styron was candid about his illness with Caputo here in “Styron’s Choices,” which originally appeared in the December 1986 of Esquire and is reprinted here with the author’s permission.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

'Moral Agents' dissects the critics who shaped mid-20th-century literature - Christian Science Monitor

'Moral Agents' dissects the critics who shaped mid-20th-century literature - Christian Science Monitor | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
One of today’s most trenchant literary critics digs into some of the voices who defined American letters for their generation.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Commentary on Saul Bellow, Norman Mailer, Lionel Trilling, Alfred Kazin, Frank O’Hara, William Maxwell, Dwight MacDonald, and W. H. Auden.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Far from the Madding Crowd: behind the scenes - Telegraph.co.uk

Far from the Madding Crowd: behind the scenes - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A new film of Far from the Madding Crowd, starring Carey Mulligan and Michael Sheen, provides a fresh take on a Hardy perennial. Georgia Dehn meets the cast and crew

 

Bathsheba Everdene’s essential dilemma in Far from the Madding Crowd is as relevant today as it was when Thomas Hardy’s novel was published in 1874. One of the first properly modern heroines in English literature, the headstrong protagonist attracts three suitors who offer her wildly different things. She’ll get loyalty and lifelong companionship from the capable shepherd Gabriel Oak; be ravished daily by the reckless Sergeant Troy; or live in status and comfort with the mature and prosperous William Boldwood. Yet Miss Everdene, the owner of a farm (which she inherits from her uncle early in the story), wishes to remain an independent woman, mucking in with milking cows and hay-baling, never wanting to be seen merely as someone else’s other half.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Metamodern Literature and the Metaverse - Huffington Post

Metamodern Literature and the Metaverse - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The term "metamodernism" first appeared in 1975, in a scholarly article by Mas'ud Zavarzadeh that focused its attention on 1970s domestic politics, a small subset of 1970s metafiction, and the burgeoning "technetronic culture" the...

 

Whatever its manifestation in literature or online, we must concede that the "metaverse" is, at its core, merely a shared falsehood that invigorates rather than enervates, one that permits the simultaneous occupation of a space by persons differently situated who are, in real-time and their honest selves, perhaps incompatible. That romantic love is often described thus says much about the simultaneous optimism and cynicism -- the juxtaposition of romanticism and poststructuralism -- of the metaverse concept and its (still non-exhaustively) theorized consequences.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This is way too meta for me. Maybe you'll understand it more than I do.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Greatness of Günter Grass - The New Yorker

The Greatness of Günter Grass - The New Yorker | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
He was the great dancer of German literature, dancing across history’s horrors toward literature’s beauty.

 

I loved him for his writing, of course—for his love of the Grimm tales, which he remade in modern dress, for the black comedy he brought to the examination of history, for the playfulness of his seriousness, for the unforgettable courage with which he looked the great evil of his time in the face and rendered the unspeakable into great art. (Later, when people threw slurs at him—Nazi, anti-Semite—I thought: let the books speak for him, the greatest anti-Nazi masterpieces ever written, containing passages about Germans’ chosen blindness toward the Holocaust that no anti-Semite could ever write.)

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

By Salman Rushdie.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

18 Literary Maps of the United States

18 Literary Maps of the United States | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
RT @mental_floss: 18 Literary Maps of the United States — http://t.co/rTyXd8Zcg9

 

The first United States transcontinental road trip was completed in 1903, and Americans have been enamored with the open road ever since. The only thing more American than a road trip? A literary route celebrating American authors. The Library of Congress’ Language of the Land exhibit collects bookish state maps that chart the regions and the writers who loved them, either through birth or discovery.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Unfortunately, the images here, even the supposedly enlarged ones, are unreadable. And there's no information on how to see the originals or purchase individual state maps. Pretty poor execution, Mental Floss.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Baileys Women's Prize For Fiction Shortlist Announced - Huffington Post UK

Baileys Women's Prize For Fiction Shortlist Announced - Huffington Post UK | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
For female authors, getting the recognition you deserve in literary circles can be almost impossible.

The majority of literary prizes are dominated by men.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Stories that shape: What are the best novels about the politics of technology? - The Guardian

Stories that shape: What are the best novels about the politics of technology? - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Georgina Voss: Which fiction books offer us useful and powerful ways to engage with the politics of science and technology?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Novels used to analyze evil - South Bend Tribune

Novels used to analyze evil - South Bend Tribune | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Evil is a theological and philosophical concept, and because most people have a connection with religion or philosophy, we know what evil looks like.

 

humanity does not possess a mechanism for examining the character traits and behaviors that lead some people to do incredibly evil things, retired University of Notre Dame professor Vera Profit says.


Profit served as a professor of French and German literature, and she used her interest in literature, along with her research into the work of scholars such as Scott Peck, who in his book “People of the Lie” sought to move the concept of evil more firmly into the scientific realm, to write her new book “The Devil Next Door: Toward a Literary and Psychological Definition of Human Evil.”

more...
No comment yet.