Literature & Psyc...
Follow
5.3K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
onto Literature & Psychology
Scoop.it!

The Varsity » Keith Oatley in the spotlight

The Varsity » Keith Oatley in the spotlight | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Keith Oatley is a novelist and professor emeritus at U of T’s Faculty of Education, OISE. For more than 25 years, he taught, researched, and published in the field of psychology. In addition to his academic background in science, his research interests have extended into the humanities, combining literary theories with cognitive science. In this Professor Spotlight, The Varsity sits down with Oatley to discuss his background and influences, how he got to U of T, the intersection of science and humanities in the field of psychology, and his advice for undergraduate students.

more...
No comment yet.
Literature & Psychology
interdisciplinary explorations
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

NYC Chancellor Pushes for Schools to Reinstate Independent-Reading Time - Education Week News (blog)

NYC Chancellor Pushes for Schools to Reinstate Independent-Reading Time - Education Week News (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
NYC Chancellor Pushes for Schools to Reinstate Independent-Reading Time
Education Week News (blog)

 

Carmen Fariña, the new schools chancellor in New York City, is bringing the specifics of classroom reading instruction back into the public eye.

 

As I wrote in July, Fariña is a fan of "balanced literacy," an approach to reading instruction that was once mandated in the city but has since been abandoned by many schools. At the heart of the approach is an emphasis on independent reading, also known as "sustained silent reading" or "drop everything and read."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

5 Twisted Thrillers For 'Gone Girl' Fans - Huffington Post (blog)

5 Twisted Thrillers For 'Gone Girl' Fans - Huffington Post (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
5 Twisted Thrillers For 'Gone Girl' Fans
Huffington Post (blog)

 

As the film campaign for David Fincher's adaptation of Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl slowly but steadily barrels ahead (see the most recent trailer here), I can't help but remember why I was addicted to the novel. Flynn has previously proved her literary finesse (Sharp Objects, Dark Places) for crafting multi-layered characters that speak to the uglier sides of human nature.

 

These five indie titles may curb your appetite for the film until in opens on October 3rd.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

History and literary homage raise great expectations

History and literary homage raise great expectations | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
I

Ideas of secret selves and the places where these may be uncovered power a lithe, sprinting plot in The Paying Guests, a novel that pays homage to writers including Dickens. One of its protagonists originates from Walworth and retreats there during a crisis.

. . .

With the intricate plotting of Dickens and the gothic textures of the novels of the Bronte sisters, Waters blurs the lines of Victorian fiction by bringing the hidden sexual world into the light, reframing erotic secrets in marvels of pseudo-Victorian crafting.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Review of "The Paying Guests" by Sarah Waters

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Government-Funded Writing Careers - OZY

Government-Funded Writing Careers - OZY | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
OZY

Government-Funded Writing Careers

 

LLiterary patronage is an old problem, one that today is increasingly solved by mega-corporations: a mobile phone company funds one of England’s top literary prizes, the Orange; a financial services firm backs the Man Booker Prize; and Amtrak’s “writers’ residencies” — which give people free long-distance train rides on which they may write — isn’t the weirdest way writers have found a monetary safety net. But before this era of private sector funding, there was a time when many writers got their start with public funds — through government programs. Some of these were designed to inspire the creatives, and others did so entirely by accident.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena: A Literary Window into Russia's Chechnya ... - War on the Rocks

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena: A Literary Window into Russia's Chechnya ... - War on the Rocks | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
War on the Rocks
A Constellation of Vital Phenomena: A Literary Window into Russia's Chechnya ...

 

Anyone who thinks “western values” are an arrogant fiction created to perpetuate the dominance of market democracies or whitewash their crimes should read A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, a heartbreakingly poignant novel about the wars in Chechnya.  Based on the reporting of amazingly brave — and murdered — Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya, and the memoir of Chechen doctor Khassan Baiev, it chillingly recounts Russia’s arbitrary and brutal reign of terror during several attempts to subdue rebellion in one of its constituent republics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Emirati literature shifted from the political to the personal, research shows - The National

Emirati literature shifted from the political to the personal, research shows - The National | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Emirati literature shifted from the political to the personal, research shows

The National

 

In the last century, the focus and inspiration for Emirati literature has shifted from political commentary to societal constraints, argues the Arabic literature professor Olatunbosun Ishaq Tijani in his continuing survey of Emirati literature.

 

Since his arrival in the Emirates in 2006, the American University of Sharjah professor has studied modern Emirati literature from its inception in the early 20th century to modern stories of wedding hall romances and shopping mall dramas.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The literary theory idea that explains how we talk about pop culture - Washington Post

The literary theory idea that explains how we talk about pop culture - Washington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The literary theory idea that explains how we talk about pop culture Washington Post

 

But I think there is something odd about the demand that creators give their imprimatur to fans’ feelings, as if those reactions are not valid on their own, or if they will make dissenters go away. Even if David Chase really did definitively say that Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) did not die in the immediate aftermath of the final scene of “The Sopranos,” that would not shut up people who will believe the mobster got iced, nor should it. 

. . .

Rather than trying to resolve the unresolvable and aligning creators’ intentions with our own feelings, I think we ought to try to do something different: learn to live with ambiguous stories, and to embrace conflicts between authorial intent and our own interpretation.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

More on authorial intent

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Why Book Criticism and Literary Culture Needs a Poptimist Revolution

Why Book Criticism and Literary Culture Needs a Poptimist Revolution | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When bestselling author Jennifer Weiner was profiled by The New Yorker in January 2014 in an article called “Written Off,” writer Rebecca Mead made sure to outline Weiner’s two audiences: one, the ...

 

Immersion in “literary” culture, the cycle of writing criticism and having your work be the subject of other writers’ criticsm, is often boring half the time, and far too often irrelevant. A vital literary culture needs to move beyond just getting off on its own erudition and figuring out the pleasures of a sharply written plot or searing dialogue. Some of that can be found beyond the borders of what’s considered critically important. Let’s become more omnivorous, voracious, generous readers, ready to move beyond our biases and prejudices, in order to read books that are more than just some dead white guy.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An interesting take on the whole "high-brow vs. low-brow" controversy in literary criticism

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Fighting the Good Fight: Jane Haddam - Publishers Weekly

Fighting the Good Fight: Jane Haddam - Publishers Weekly | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Fighting the Good Fight: Jane Haddam

Publishers Weekly

 

Fighting Chance illustrates Haddam’s talent in keeping the long-running series, launched in 1990, fresh. Rather than follow detective fiction tradition and focus on her lead, Gregor, and the ups and downs of his personal life, Haddam makes her readers care about the characters who appear only in one book, often opening a novel with lengthy sections providing the perspectives of half-a-dozen people: one or more of whom will be the victim and one or more of whom will be unmasked as the killer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Sheridan Le Fanu's haunting legacy - Irish Times

Sheridan Le Fanu's haunting legacy - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Sheridan Le Fanu's haunting legacy
Irish Times

 

Sheridan Le Fanu: he greatly pushed out the boundaries of the Victorian ghost story. He was a meticulous craftsman who combined the contemporary Gothic literary conventions with his own realistic technique to produce stories with psychological insight and supernatural terror.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

'Lock In': A Cop Story For Robot Lovers, A Robot Story For Cop Lovers - KPLU News for Seattle and the Northwest

'Lock In': A Cop Story For Robot Lovers, A Robot Story For Cop Lovers
KPLU News for Seattle and the Northwest

 

crossing those streams — creating a science fiction procedural — is almost always a bad idea. By nature, your garden-variety procedural has to start with a bang that drops you not into the world, but into the middle of a mystery. And in science fiction, all but the best (or trickiest) authors have to front-load their stories with exposition and world-building that roots you in a place, but not necessarily in the action. Thus, the conundrum: Right from page one, the author either has to short the action or short the world. So it's a good thing that John Scalzi seems to have missed that memo.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Fake memoirs: Academic says we should not disregard books because they unexpectedly change genre - The Independent

Fake memoirs: Academic says we should not disregard books because they unexpectedly change genre - The Independent | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Independent
Fake memoirs: Academic says we should not disregard books because they ...

 

"Readers might feel angry or betrayed when they discover the truth. But I wonder if very strict boundaries between different literary genres are partly to blame. If memoirs include even a small amount of fictional or reconstructed material, they may be judged as wholly worthless, even though they may have value in literary or psychological terms that exceeds their truth value."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Rachel Cusk: 'Aftermath was creative death. I was heading into total silence'

Rachel Cusk: 'Aftermath was creative death. I was heading into total silence' | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The controversial writer talks about the hostile reaction to her 2012 account of the breakdown of her marriage and how she finally rediscovered her voice.

 

Finding form as a writer, she argues, has always been her most important task – it took two years to hit upon Outline's outline. The writing itself is secondary. For a writer of eloquent precision, it is interesting to hear her shrug off the question of style. She sees style as inescapable from self, allied to it: "Just as a person, don't you sometimes get sick of being yourself and want to be the thing you aren't? But you are the thing you are – to me, that is style. It is relatively bonded to self and there is not a lot you can do about it. Form is different." She cannot be found in the new novel, she says, yet she is there. She believes Outline's "annihilated perspective" might be the "beginning of something interesting" (she is already working on a sequel). And now she makes another astonishing assertion: "I'm certain autobiography is increasingly the only form in all the arts. Description, character – these are dead or dying in reality as well as in art." Is she right? I'm not sure. Even on literary turf, she is effortlessly provocative.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Much here about writing: voice, form, style, life

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

A back-to-school reading list of classic literature - OUPblog (blog)

A back-to-school reading list of classic literature - OUPblog (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
A back-to-school reading list of classic literature
OUPblog (blog)

 

With carefree summer winding to a close, we’ve pulled together some reading recommendations to put you in a studious mood. Check out these Oxford World’s Classics suggestions to get ready for another season of books and papers. Even if you’re no longer a student, there’s something on this list for every literary enthusiast

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A list with a twist: This is not a static list, but rather suggestions for "If you liked . . . try . . ."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Mafia Killer's Autobiography Malerba Outrages Sicilian Literary Award Judge - International Business Times UK

Mafia Killer's Autobiography Malerba Outrages Sicilian Literary Award Judge - International Business Times UK | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
International Business Times UK

Mafia Killer's Autobiography Malerba Outrages Sicilian Literary Award Judge

 

The autobiography of a jailed Mafia killer has been selected as finalist for a Sicilian literary award, prompting the resignation of a juror who claimed the choice offended the memory of the author's victims.

 

Literary critic Gaspare Agnello said that the decision to admit a book by cosa nostra affiliate Giuseppe Grassonelli to the final has soiled the name of the prize dedicated to Leonardo Sciascia, a late Sicilian writer who helped raise awareness on Mafia issues through his work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Weight of Words: New Course Tackles Writers' Impact on Black History - The Root

The Weight of Words: New Course Tackles Writers' Impact on Black History - The Root | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Weight of Words: New Course Tackles Writers' Impact on Black History
The Root

 

In an online course, professor James Basker is hoping to bring new attention to anti-slavery writings in order to show the profound impact of literature on society. 

 

Literature—regardless of how it is delivered, whether in song, sermon, novel, short story, poem or essay—has the unique ability to inform, to uplift, and to shape our opinions and worldviews.

 

At least that’s how James Basker, the Richard Gilder Professor of Literary History at Barnard College at Columbia University, sees it. It’s a crucial point and question in his new online master’s course Amazing Grace: How Writers Helped End Slavery.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

10 Best Patricia Highsmith Books

10 Best Patricia Highsmith Books | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The best of the best from one of the 20th century's greats.

 

Her great invention was Highsmith Country, the Alternate Earth where all her detail-saturated fictions are set. There, good intentions corrupt naturally; guilt afflicts the innocent; pursuit is everywhere; identities, genders, and genres are undermined; and life is a suffocating trap from which even her most accomplished escape artists cannot find a graceful exit.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Biographer of novelist Patricia Highsmith, creator of Tom Ripley, describes Highsmith's best books.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

14 YouTube Series Literature Lovers Must Watch - Mic

14 YouTube Series Literature Lovers Must Watch - Mic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mic
14 YouTube Series Literature Lovers Must Watch
Mic
The Lizzie Bennet Diaries is where this whole literary adaptation movement began.

 

So, what are the best series in this golden age of literary YouTube? Here's a look at 14 literary-inspired series that have been developed so far. They might not all be must-sees, but they are all part of a literary conversation that's happening in a very unlikely place.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Sheridan Le Fanu's gothic spirit lives on - The Guardian (blog)

Sheridan Le Fanu's gothic spirit lives on - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)

Sheridan Le Fanu's gothic spirit lives on

 

A great-nephew of Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Le Fanu was the son of a Protestant churchman. He studied law at Trinity, but neglected the bar in favour of journalism and fiction. From 1844 to 1858, he was married to Susanna Bennett, who suffered from mental disorders that must have influenced Le Fanu's depiction of extreme neuroses. He was among the first practitioners of the psychological ghost story, in which the haunting might be the result of supernatural intrusion into the everyday world but could also arise from the broken psyche of a protagonist.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

MaddAddam: Darren Aronofsky bringing Margaret Atwood trilogy to HBO - The Vancouver Observer

MaddAddam: Darren Aronofsky bringing Margaret Atwood trilogy to HBO - The Vancouver Observer | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Vancouver Observer

MaddAddam: Darren Aronofsky bringing Margaret Atwood trilogy to HBO

 

A sci-fi trilogy by Canadian literary giant Margaret Atwood is coming to HBO, courtesy of Darren Aronofsky and his production company, Protozoa Pictures.

 

Aronofsky's publicity team has confirmed that Protozoa Pictures is adapting "Oryx and Crake", "Year of the Flood", and "MaddAddam" into a TV miniseries that will simply be titled "MaddAdam".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

The Tony Soprano and Hello Kitty stories are about the same thing

The Tony Soprano and Hello Kitty stories are about the same thing | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
These two stories are about exactly the same thing (LITERARY CRITICISM 101 http://t.co/J25YXwpaYo)

 

Authorial intent is an idea within criticism of what the author intended when he or she created a work of art. It rose out of the world of literary criticism, which is why the word "author" is there, but it's gradually come to be applied to just about every possible artform.

 

If you are a big believer in authorial intent (sometimes called an intentionalist), then you believe wholeheartedly that what the author wanted to do with the work is one of the most important things that can be determined. Thus, if David Chase says Tony Soprano is alive or J.K. Rowling says Dumbledore is gay or Sanrio says Hello Kitty is a girl, you probably revise your opinions of the work in question to reflect these ideas.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Interesting explication of a basic facet of literary criticism.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

How do writers find their voices? - The Guardian (blog)

How do writers find their voices? - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)
How do writers find their voices?

 

The idea that writers can somehow "hear" the voice of their characters is a familiar one, as is the notion that characters seem to write themselves: that the author is merely a kind of conduit for voices that seem to have lives all of their own.


However, describing where that voice comes from, what it sounds like and how it feels to experience a character so intimately is a much more difficult – and more fascinating – matter, as a team of Durham University researchers have been discovering at the Edinburgh international book festival.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset - India.com

Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset - India.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

India.com
Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset

 

“Consumers may choose to read a tragic fictional story because they assume that knowing it was fictional would make them less sad than reading a less dramatic but true story,” said study authors Jane E.J. Ebert from Massachusetts based Brandeis University and Tom Meyvis from New York University.

 

However, the fictional nature does not alter the impact of the tragic story, leaving them more emotionally distraught than if they had read the true story instead. In the midst of an emotional experience, consumers are so absorbed that they might be unable to take into account the fictional nature of the story.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This is not that surprising, since good fiction transports us into a world that seems as real as the world around us.

more...
Christa Wojo's curator insight, August 28, 9:19 AM

Tragic stories are my favorite. Why do we love the ones that make us cry?

Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Writers Should Examine Everything, Even the Supermarket - The Atlantic

Writers Should Examine Everything, Even the Supermarket - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Writers Should Examine Everything, Even the Supermarket
The Atlantic

 

Don DeLillo’s White Noise works a potent magic on author Stephan Eirik Clark: After re-reading that book’s billowing first paragraphs, he sat down and began typing the first words of his own first novel, Sweetness #9. As he explains in an essay for this series, Clark loves DeLillo for the way he imbues American culture with a nearly religious significance, unpacking its intricacies like a theologian. He discussed why, more than any other book a shelf of cherished classics, DeLillo makes him want to sit down and write.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Daniels Brown
Scoop.it!

Family tries to find 'normal' after their lost boy returns - Press Herald

Family tries to find 'normal' after their lost boy returns - Press Herald | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Family tries to find 'normal' after their lost boy returns

Press Herald

 

A page-turner of a plot alone usually is not enough to keep me reading long into the night, abandoning my dreams for a writer’s creative imaginings. Bret Anthony Johnston delivers the special something that makes a book worth losing sleep over: a masterfully designed architecture of psychological truths and observations that build ironclad believability.

 

Just a couple of chapters into “Remember Me Like This,” I cared enough about the family to live in this novel until Johnston delivered the final word. Like the best contemporary American authors, he abstains from sermonizing and builds his story with description and the accumulation of telling details.

more...
No comment yet.