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'Twilight' Is Not Simply a Pro-Life Fantasy

'Twilight' Is Not Simply a Pro-Life Fantasy | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
It understands that childbirth is scary and dangerous, transformative and worthwhile.

 

In particular, I think it's false, to my own experience at least, to deny that there is something transformative about bringing children into this world. As a father, my son is just about the most important thing that's ever happened to me. I wouldn't say that he's made me "more beautiful, stronger, more sexual" than I'd ever been as a human (and I doubt my wife would say that he'd made her any of those things either)...but still. It's a pretty fucking big deal. Bella's transformation from human to vampire is in part a metaphor for her transition from woman to mother—a transition accomplished in fear, pain, terror, and love. And while I can't speak to that in terms of women changing to mothers, I can testify that, as a metaphor for the transition from man to father, it has a certain emotional veracity.

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When Did Books Get So Freaking Enormous? The Year of the Very Long Novel

When Did Books Get So Freaking Enormous? The Year of the Very Long Novel | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
When did books get so freaking long?

Via Sharon Bakar
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The Psychological Comforts of Storytelling

The Psychological Comforts of Storytelling | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Why, throughout human history, have people been so drawn to fiction?
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Multiple theories about why we are so drawn to stories.

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The brilliant Brontë sisters are getting a BBC series - Entertainment Weekly (blog)

The brilliant Brontë sisters are getting a BBC series - Entertainment Weekly (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë, together one of the most fascinating and mysterious literary trios in history, are coming to television.

Sally Wainwright, award-winning writer of Happy Valley and Last Tango in Halifax, will write and direct To Walk Invisible: The Brontë Sisters. Wainwright said to BBC: “I’m thrilled beyond measure that I’ve been asked by the BBC to bring to life these three fascinating, talented, ingenious Yorkshire women.”

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Author Anna Clark explores Michigan's rich literary history

Author Anna Clark explores Michigan's rich literary history | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Michigan has a long and well-known history of car manufacturing, mining, logging, and agriculture. But there's something else this state produces: writers.

 

Anna Clark's new book explores the lives of ten of Michigan's most notable writers. Michigan Literary Luminaries: from Elmore Leonard to Robert Hayden is a collection of essays that are not just biographies.

. . .

These profiles go beyond basic timelines and major milestones. Clark examines her subjects' day-to-day lives in a way that adds context to their literary works. Lost in the flurry of the thousand biographies in existence is how these larger-than-life characters juggled their responsibilities, rents, families, and jobs with a rarely lucrative passion.

 

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Top 10 (unconventional) ghosts in literature - The Guardian

Top 10 (unconventional) ghosts in literature - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
These ghosts do not need to rattle chains and howl; they may not necessarily scare, but they manage to haunt, long after the pages have been turned

 

“In literature,” says the writer Tabitha King, “the ghost is almost always a metaphor for the past.” This is true for literal ghosts who manifest in graveyards, and it’s true for figurative ghosts who are no more substantive than insistent memory. The ghosts I list here may not be what we usually think of when we hear the word “ghosts”. But these are the phantoms that kept me turning pages, the ones I never forgot when I finished the book. That means they are haunting me still, and really – what more can one ask of a ghost?

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Six literary characters that entrepreneurs can learn from - YourStory.com

Six literary characters that entrepreneurs can learn from - YourStory.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
While fictional, literary characters do bring in admirable qualities that several entrepreneurs can learn from.
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When women step out of Indian epics to express real desires and choices in real books

When women step out of Indian epics to express real desires and choices in real books | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mythological characters are reincarnated as real women walking the corridors of literary history.
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Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 109, John Fowles

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 109, John Fowles | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Paris Review is a literary magazine featuring original writing, art, and in-depth interviews with famous writers.

 

The view of Lyme Bay from Fowles’s own Belmont House is described in the opening chapters of his most famous novel, The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1969), which won the Silver Pen Award from PEN International and the W. H. Smith Literary Award. The apprenticeship was over. This pseudo-historical novel revealed a new openness to experimentation with narrative voices and an intellectual sophistication that has marked all his later fiction: The Ebony Tower (1974), Daniel Martin (1977), Mantissa (1982), and A Maggot (1985).

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

An article about John Fowles from 1989.

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Colombia investigates stunning theft of Garcia Marquez's signed masterpiece - Winnipeg Free Press

Colombia investigates stunning theft of Garcia Marquez's signed masterpiece - Winnipeg Free Press | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
BOGOTA - Colombian police are investigating the theft of a valuable first edition copy of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's masterpiece "One Hundred Years of Solitude."The book disappeared over the weekend from a guarded display case at Bogota's book fair,...
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Lemony Snicket's writing advice also applies to living well - Mashable

Lemony Snicket's writing advice also applies to living well - Mashable | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Lemony Snicket may be new to the world of social media but his rules for online writing are pretty spot-on.

 

The author of childhood classics such as A Series of Unfortunate Events and All The Wrong Questions has dived more into social media recently, especially as he prepares for the #TwitterFiction Festival. Founded in 2009, the festival is an annual celebration of online storytelling.

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From the margins: JK Rowling, Hilary Mantel and Ian McEwan annotate their own works - in pictures

From the margins: JK Rowling, Hilary Mantel and Ian McEwan annotate their own works - in pictures | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
From Amsterdam to Wolf Hall, some of the world's most acclaimed writers have annotated their own first editions

Via Sharon Bakar
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, May 11, 10:32 PM

Fascinating insights.

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How to Make a Good Film About Writing - The New Republic

How to Make a Good Film About Writing - The New Republic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
As a new film starring James Franco shows, it's not easy. But other examples show it's possible.

 

The better, more enjoyable films about writers tend to externalize the writerly angst in a heightened, almost baroque fashion. John Torturro’s Barton Fink struggles to write on his first job in Hollywood and winds up being framed for a murder. Two of the more accomplished Stephen King adaptations, Misery and The Shining, play on the anxiety of literary fame and writer’s block, respectively.

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How poetry can help us say the unsayable - The Seattle Times

How poetry can help us say the unsayable - The Seattle Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
How art — especially literature and poetry most of all — can help us.
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So You Think You're a Literary Critic? 19 Books for Understanding Literature

So You Think You're a Literary Critic? 19 Books for Understanding Literature | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
From literary criticism to literary theory, the world has no shortage of people prepared to offer a strong opinion on literature. Here are 19 books covering the phenomenon.
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

A solid list of resources

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Wrestling With Saul Bellow: A New Biography Renews the Fight Over the ... - Vulture

Wrestling With Saul Bellow: A New Biography Renews the Fight Over the ... - Vulture | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Brute or genius? Loathed or loved? For me, the war is personal.

 

Bellow, who won more literary prizes than any other American writer — three National Book Awards, a Pulitzer Prize, and the Nobel Prize in 1976 — has always aroused strong emotions. John Berryman, an intimate of Bellow, dedicated a poem in his Dream Song cycle to him. Anne Sexton, also a Bellow friend and swept up — unromantically — into Bellow’s magnetism, used a passage from Herzog as the epigraph to her Pulitzer Prize–winning Live or Die. Herbert Gold, once a friend of Bellow, lashed out at him in his memoir, describing him as a solipsist “who banged on his high chair with his spoon.” Philip Roth presented a thinly disguised Bellow as a suave meganarcissist in the character of Felix Abravanel in The Ghost Writer. Salman Rushdie and Ian McEwan both wrote novels based on earlier novels by Bellow. 

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Welcome to Literature's Duchamp Moment - The New Republic

Welcome to Literature's Duchamp Moment - The New Republic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
We don’t live like nineteenth-century French novelists anymore, so we should stop writing according to their conventions.

 

Call them, instead, the Reality Hunger generation, after David Shields’ ingenious and prophetic 2008 manifesto on contemporary writing. For Shields, novels that employ the traditional conventions of narration, plot, and story no longer make sense. Reality is fiction, and fiction is reality. For a more accurate reflection of how we experience this reality, we ought to think of novels the way we think about art. “A novel, for most readers—and critics—is primarily a ‘story,’” writes Shields. “But a work of art, like the world, is a living form. It’s in its form that its reality resides.” So if form is now all-important—more so than content—what is the form that contemporary works of art so often take? Collage. This also happens to be the form of Reality Hunger. In addition to outlining the future of artistic production, Reality Hunger doubles as a blueprint for it: It is a pastiche, a series of intentionally “plagiarized” aphorisms, presented without quotation marks.

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Writing a Psychological Thriller by C L Taylor

Writing a Psychological Thriller by C L Taylor | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Characters need to have a goal, something they desperately want more than anything else in the world. It has to be something that’s difficult for them to attain, there have to be a lot of risks and difficult decisions involved and there has to be real, or imagined (there’s the unreliable narrator again), danger along the way. If your reader likes your character enough they’ll be mentally urging her on to achieve her goal, holding their breath as they turn the pages.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This advice for writers also benefits readers.

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Can't wait for “True Detective 2″? Dive into Ross Macdonald's California noir ... - Salon

Can't wait for “True Detective 2″? Dive into Ross Macdonald's California noir ... - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The legendary writer of psychoanalytic mysteries captured the culture of postwar California better than anyone
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Absinthe: How the Green Fairy became literature’s drink

Absinthe: How the Green Fairy became literature’s drink | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
It has inspired many great authors of the last 150 years – and may have ruined some as well. Jane Ciabattari investigates the green spirit’s peculiar power.
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John Rowlands: Author who eschewed popular taste in order to explore the human mind and his own inner life

John Rowlands: Author who eschewed popular taste in order to explore the human mind and his own inner life | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Among the prose writers who began making names for themselves in the 1960s, when the novel was enjoying a new vogue in Wales, John Rowlands ploughed a lone furrow. Instead of trying to appeal to popular taste, he made the exploration of inner life his priority. The consequence was that his seven novels, though admired by his peers, were thought “difficult” and “highbrow” by those who wanted merely a good yarn or easy read.

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Two physicians examine heart disease through a literary lens - News-Medical.net

Two physicians examine heart disease through a literary lens - News-Medical.net | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Heart disease has topped mortality charts as the No. 1 killer of men and women for many decades, but a novel analysis of American literary fiction by two physicians finds the disorder’s presence in great novels has remained relatively modest.

 

Oldfield and Jones say their analysis follows the parallel trajectories of literary narratives and biomedical science, seeking to understand whether new and improved medical understanding of cardiovascular disease fueled changes in the literary representations of it. Their conclusion: Although fictional heart disease narratives accurately reflect advances on the medical front, biomedical imagery remains limited in its capacity to convey the full meaning of what it means to live with heart disease.

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At West Point, warriors shaped through Plutarch and Shakespeare - Los Angeles Times

At West Point, warriors shaped through Plutarch and Shakespeare - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
So crisp in the morning light they were, nine cadets, dressed in fatigues and sand-colored boots, hearing the curious news that the poet would outlive the warrior.
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Marxist Literary Criticism, Then and Now : Mediations : Journal of the Marxist Literary Group

Marxist Literary Criticism, Then and Now : Mediations : Journal of the Marxist Literary Group | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Is there such a thing as a Marxist literary criticism? Imre Szeman argues that, despite the fact that Marxism has long privileged literature as an object of analysis and critique, there is no unitary...
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10 Utterly Brilliant Novels That Have One Fatal Flaw - io9

10 Utterly Brilliant Novels That Have One Fatal Flaw - io9 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

There’s no such thing as a perfect book — but some books feel as though they could be just about perfect, if they didn’t have one nagging problem. And sometimes, the most wonderful books have the most glaring shortfalls. Here are 10 amazing novels that are each marred by a fatal flaw.

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Crime writer Minette Walters: 'I've done a lot of research into what makes a ... - The Guardian

Crime writer Minette Walters: 'I've done a lot of research into what makes a ... - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
As the novelist brings out a new book after a long break, she talks about following in the footsteps of Ruth Rendell and PD James, violence against women in TV drama and why prisoners should be allowed to vote...
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Minette Walters is one of my favorite crime novelists. Read her early works mentioned in this article to find out why.

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