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In Uyo, writers beam light on security, social media, literature - The Guardian Nigeria

In Uyo, writers beam light on security, social media, literature - The Guardian Nigeria | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In Uyo, writers beam light on security, social media, literature The Guardian Nigeria

 

“I am saying that a thousand, two thousand years from now, a future civilization will look beyond the archives constituted by disciplinary history and privilege the truths secured by Nigerian fiction today as a window into how we negotiated our march towards the mountaintop, the roads taken and the road not taken (apologies to Robert Frost), how we lived, laughed, loved, and hated. How we kidnapped. How we bombed. How we killed. How we pogromed. If, as it is tempting to predict, given our talent for self-inflicted national injuries, we somehow never make it to the mountaintop, we need not worry. Our literature will secure that failure against forgetting.

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How do writers find their voices? - The Guardian (blog)

How do writers find their voices? - The Guardian (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)
How do writers find their voices?

 

The idea that writers can somehow "hear" the voice of their characters is a familiar one, as is the notion that characters seem to write themselves: that the author is merely a kind of conduit for voices that seem to have lives all of their own.


However, describing where that voice comes from, what it sounds like and how it feels to experience a character so intimately is a much more difficult – and more fascinating – matter, as a team of Durham University researchers have been discovering at the Edinburgh international book festival.

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Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset - India.com

Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset - India.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

India.com
Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset

 

“Consumers may choose to read a tragic fictional story because they assume that knowing it was fictional would make them less sad than reading a less dramatic but true story,” said study authors Jane E.J. Ebert from Massachusetts based Brandeis University and Tom Meyvis from New York University.

 

However, the fictional nature does not alter the impact of the tragic story, leaving them more emotionally distraught than if they had read the true story instead. In the midst of an emotional experience, consumers are so absorbed that they might be unable to take into account the fictional nature of the story.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

This is not that surprising, since good fiction transports us into a world that seems as real as the world around us.

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Christa Wojo's curator insight, August 28, 9:19 AM

Tragic stories are my favorite. Why do we love the ones that make us cry?

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Writers Should Examine Everything, Even the Supermarket - The Atlantic

Writers Should Examine Everything, Even the Supermarket - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Writers Should Examine Everything, Even the Supermarket
The Atlantic

 

Don DeLillo’s White Noise works a potent magic on author Stephan Eirik Clark: After re-reading that book’s billowing first paragraphs, he sat down and began typing the first words of his own first novel, Sweetness #9. As he explains in an essay for this series, Clark loves DeLillo for the way he imbues American culture with a nearly religious significance, unpacking its intricacies like a theologian. He discussed why, more than any other book a shelf of cherished classics, DeLillo makes him want to sit down and write.

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Family tries to find 'normal' after their lost boy returns - Press Herald

Family tries to find 'normal' after their lost boy returns - Press Herald | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Family tries to find 'normal' after their lost boy returns

Press Herald

 

A page-turner of a plot alone usually is not enough to keep me reading long into the night, abandoning my dreams for a writer’s creative imaginings. Bret Anthony Johnston delivers the special something that makes a book worth losing sleep over: a masterfully designed architecture of psychological truths and observations that build ironclad believability.

 

Just a couple of chapters into “Remember Me Like This,” I cared enough about the family to live in this novel until Johnston delivered the final word. Like the best contemporary American authors, he abstains from sermonizing and builds his story with description and the accumulation of telling details.

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A Master of Many Universes - New York Times

A Master of Many Universes - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
New York Times
A Master of Many Universes

 

In the past decade, Mr. Mitchell has evolved from being a cult author with a small but rabid fan base to a major literary figure whose work has been compared to that of Nabokov, Pynchon and Dostoyevsky. Five of his six novels have been nominated for the Man Booker Prize, including his latest, “The Bone Clocks.” His genre-defying 2004 novel, “Cloud Atlas,” sold a million copies in North America and was adapted into a feature film. Academics and superfans pore over his works with the intensity of Talmudic scholars, and gather at David Mitchell conferences that feature panel discussions on subjects like “Narratology and the Mitchell Multiverse.”t cast their previous literary incarnations in a strange new light.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Mitchell's new novel, "The Bone Clocks," will be published in the U.S. on September 2.

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'Wizard of Oz' forever linked to Kansas' legacy - Kansas.com

'Wizard of Oz' forever linked to Kansas' legacy - Kansas.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
'Wizard of Oz' forever linked to Kansas' legacy

Kansas.com

 

The 1939 movie defined much of the Kansas image more so than the book, said Thomas Averill, a Kansas historian and a professor of English at Washburn University in Topeka.

 

“It’s not always a positive image,” Averill said. “Kansas is seen in black and white. Judy Garland is sort of an emotive Dorothy, where in the book Dorothy is pretty determined and practical.”

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Ferguson's Literary History

Ferguson's Literary History | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
If much else is murky, one thing is clear: you cannot understand #Ferguson without hitting the books. Though the continued relevance of many of our best nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers on...
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Can sci-fi save the romantic comedy? - The Week Magazine

Can sci-fi save the romantic comedy? - The Week Magazine | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Can sci-fi save the romantic comedy?

The Week Magazine

 

there's a key exception to the general dearth of quality romantic stories at the cineplex: science fiction. The sci-fi romance — whether comedy or drama — has quietly pushed the genre to the cutting edge of thoughtful, emotional cinema.

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Alan Gibbons: why YA fiction is crucial for shaping our attitudes to subcultures - The Guardian

Alan Gibbons: why YA fiction is crucial for shaping our attitudes to subcultures - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian

Alan Gibbons: why YA fiction is crucial for shaping our attitudes to subcultures

 

In the end, what I had to say about identity came down to a simple human impulse. Whether your search for identity revolves around something innate or social, your class, gender, sexuality or the colour of your skin, or whether it is conditioned by the life choices you make, you have the right to express it without facing prejudice, hostility or crude judgements. Literature is as effective a forum for upholding this, as music or fashion or any other form of expression.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

The author of the novel "Hate" on the relationship between literature and the search for identity

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Why Do We Read? - The Weekly Standard

Why Do We Read? - The Weekly Standard | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Why Do We Read?

The Weekly Standard

 

Gay Saul Morson is a rarity in American academia. The holder of an endowed chair at Northwestern University and winner of prestigious literary awards such as the René Wellek Prize from the American Comparative Literature Association nevertheless admits publicly that he most often turns to literature “as a source of wisdom and insight.” Despite his renown, Morson has few followers among contemporary critics: The compendious Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism lists 12 modern and contemporary schools and movements, but none of the 12—representative examples include deconstruction and poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, gay and lesbian criticism and queer theory—seems to have room for literary critics who search for “wisdom and insight.”

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The politics of fiction

The politics of fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Listening to stories widens the imagination; telling them lets us leap over cultural walls, embrace different experiences, feel what others feel. Elif Shafak builds on this simple idea to argue that fiction can overcome identity politics.

Via Sharon Bakar
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D​id Harry Potter Influence The Political Views of Millennials? - io9

D​id Harry Potter Influence The Political Views of Millennials? - io9 | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
SBS
Did Harry Potter Influence The Political Views of Millennials?
io9

 

Kids who grew up reading the Harry Potter books are voting in U.S. elections. And now a new study says the adventures of the young wizard might have cast an enduring spell on its fans, subtly shaping their values and political views. The Millennial Generation is actually the Muggle Generation.

 

Anthony Gierzynski, a political scientist at the University of Vermont, interviewed more than 1,100 Millennial-aged college students across the nation. He found that young people who grew up as Harry Potter fans are more open to diversity and are more politically tolerant than nonfans. The fans are also less likely to support the use of deadly force or torture, more politically active and more likely to have had a negative view of the Bush administration. Gierzynski says these correlations remained significant even when applying more sophisticated statistical analyses — controlling for other factors, such as parental influences.

... books had "brainwashed" Millennials.

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More Than a Century Later, Sophia Tolstoy Has Her Say - New York Times

More Than a Century Later, Sophia Tolstoy Has Her Say - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
New York Times
More Than a Century Later, Sophia Tolstoy Has Her Say

 

In her long and often turbulent marriage to Leo Tolstoy, Sophia Andreevna Tolstoy put up with a lot, but “The Kreutzer Sonata” qualified as special punishment. Published in 1889, the story presented Tolstoy’s increasingly radical views on sexual relations and marriage through a frenzied monologue delivered by a narrator who, in a fit of jealousy and disgust, murdered his wife.

 

In her diary, Sophia wrote: “I do not know how or why everyone connected ‘The Kreutzer Sonata’ with our own married life, but this is what has happened.” Members of the Tolstoy family circle and the czar himself had expressed pity for her, she complained. “And it isn’t just other people,” she added. “I, too, know in my heart that this story is directed against me, and that it has done me a great wrong, humiliated me in the eyes of the world and destroyed the last vestiges of love between us.”

 

Convinced that the story was “untrue in everything relating to a young woman’s experiences,” Sophia wrote two novellas setting forth her own views, “Whose Fault?” and “Song Without Words,” which both languished in the archives of the Tolstoy Museum until their recent rediscovery

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Sheridan Le Fanu's haunting legacy - Irish Times

Sheridan Le Fanu's haunting legacy - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Sheridan Le Fanu's haunting legacy
Irish Times

 

Sheridan Le Fanu: he greatly pushed out the boundaries of the Victorian ghost story. He was a meticulous craftsman who combined the contemporary Gothic literary conventions with his own realistic technique to produce stories with psychological insight and supernatural terror.

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'Lock In': A Cop Story For Robot Lovers, A Robot Story For Cop Lovers - KPLU News for Seattle and the Northwest

'Lock In': A Cop Story For Robot Lovers, A Robot Story For Cop Lovers
KPLU News for Seattle and the Northwest

 

crossing those streams — creating a science fiction procedural — is almost always a bad idea. By nature, your garden-variety procedural has to start with a bang that drops you not into the world, but into the middle of a mystery. And in science fiction, all but the best (or trickiest) authors have to front-load their stories with exposition and world-building that roots you in a place, but not necessarily in the action. Thus, the conundrum: Right from page one, the author either has to short the action or short the world. So it's a good thing that John Scalzi seems to have missed that memo.

 

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Fake memoirs: Academic says we should not disregard books because they unexpectedly change genre - The Independent

Fake memoirs: Academic says we should not disregard books because they unexpectedly change genre - The Independent | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Independent
Fake memoirs: Academic says we should not disregard books because they ...

 

"Readers might feel angry or betrayed when they discover the truth. But I wonder if very strict boundaries between different literary genres are partly to blame. If memoirs include even a small amount of fictional or reconstructed material, they may be judged as wholly worthless, even though they may have value in literary or psychological terms that exceeds their truth value."

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Rachel Cusk: 'Aftermath was creative death. I was heading into total silence'

Rachel Cusk: 'Aftermath was creative death. I was heading into total silence' | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

The controversial writer talks about the hostile reaction to her 2012 account of the breakdown of her marriage and how she finally rediscovered her voice.

 

Finding form as a writer, she argues, has always been her most important task – it took two years to hit upon Outline's outline. The writing itself is secondary. For a writer of eloquent precision, it is interesting to hear her shrug off the question of style. She sees style as inescapable from self, allied to it: "Just as a person, don't you sometimes get sick of being yourself and want to be the thing you aren't? But you are the thing you are – to me, that is style. It is relatively bonded to self and there is not a lot you can do about it. Form is different." She cannot be found in the new novel, she says, yet she is there. She believes Outline's "annihilated perspective" might be the "beginning of something interesting" (she is already working on a sequel). And now she makes another astonishing assertion: "I'm certain autobiography is increasingly the only form in all the arts. Description, character – these are dead or dying in reality as well as in art." Is she right? I'm not sure. Even on literary turf, she is effortlessly provocative.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Much here about writing: voice, form, style, life

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Lucy Mangan on whether literature can fix the economy - Radio Times

Lucy Mangan on whether literature can fix the economy - Radio Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Radio Times

Lucy Mangan on whether literature can fix the economy

 

In the end, I settled on five books whose authors offer brilliant illustrations of various aspects of our [economic] troubles and possible ways to solve or avoid them in the future. 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

From the U.K.

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what makes a great thriller - Telegraph.co.uk

what makes a great thriller - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk

what makes a great thriller

 

My favourite thrillers, however, are those that reflect society. There couldn’t be two more contrasting narratives than Raven Black by Ann Cleeves, about a murder on Shetland and The Collini Case, Ferdinand von Schirach's chilling courtroom drama based on true events which helped to change the course of German legal history.

 

Yet both books held me gripped by their detailed description of time and place and their forensic analysis of the motivations of men.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

See also what this article has to say about the adaptation of thrillers to film.

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Publish and Cherish - New York Times

Publish and Cherish - New York Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
New York Times
Publish and Cherish

 

“O, rocks! she said. Tell us in plain words.” So goes Molly Bloom’s plea to Leo­pold to explain metempsychosis, the transmigration of souls.

 

I thought of this line often while reading Kevin Birmingham’s “The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses,’ ” a rich, detailed, mostly wise account of how the novel’s decade-long ban inspired the modernizing of the legal definition of obscenity and extended the categories of speech covered by the First Amendment.

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Required Reading: 10 Books We Read For Class That Will Change Your Life - Huffington Post

Required Reading: 10 Books We Read For Class That Will Change Your Life - Huffington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Required Reading: 10 Books We Read For Class That Will Change Your Life

Huffington Post

 

No summer, no matter how sunny and fun-filled, can last forever, as kids must painfully remember every year with the return of back-to-school shopping and early-morning alarms. Now that back-to-school season has rolled around once again, kids everywhere are engaging in a time-honored ritual: pulling out the school summer reading lists they've been ignoring since June and groaning with dismay and panic.

 

But it doesn't have to be that way! Sometimes reading books we're assigned to read, rather than those we would pick up on our own, can be a blessing rather than a curse. It can lead us to unexpected treasures, introduce us to unfamiliar and unexpected points of view, and challenge us in surprising ways. HuffPost Entertainment's team rounded up their absolute favorite required reading from their school years and revealed what made those assigned books so memorable.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Look especially at what Maddie Crum had to say about reading Freud.

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Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction - Los Angeles Times

Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction - Los Angeles Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Sci-fi and fantasy authors reveal truths in the strangest fiction
Los Angeles Times

 

"There's a sense among readers and critics, and probably among authors too, that [science fiction and fantasy] are somehow more fictional than regular fiction," says Lev Grossman, author of the bestselling Magicians series. "They're more loosely tethered to the real world, so they don't reflect or aren't affected by what's happening in it. Which is silly if you think about it. Mrs. Dalloway is no more real than Harry Potter."

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Feeling short on banter? Here are the 5 books you need to read to improve your holiday chat - Telegraph.co.uk

Feeling short on banter? Here are the 5 books you need to read to improve your holiday chat - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Telegraph.co.uk
Feeling short on banter? Here are the 5 books you need to read to improve your holiday chat

 

A holiday (even a long weekend) is the perfect time to catch-up on some reading and improve the calibre of your conversation. Even Alexa Chung is at it. Radhika Sanghani suggests five books you should read to stimulate your brain when it's in 'relax mode'

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

There's at least one thing for everyone on this eclectic list

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Elena Ferrante on the Origins of her Neapolitan Novels - Vogue.com

Elena Ferrante on the Origins of her Neapolitan Novels - Vogue.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Elena Ferrante on the Origins of her Neapolitan Novels
Vogue.com
“Relationships between women don't have solid rules like those between men,” says the Italian author Elena Ferrante.

 

“Relationships between women don’t have solid rules like those between men,” says the Italian author Elena Ferrante. “I was interested in recounting how a long friendship between two women could endure and survive in spite of good and bad feelings, dependence and rebellion, mutual support and betrayal.”

 

It would be difficult to find a deeper portrait of women’s friendship than the one in Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels, which unfold from the fifties to the twenty-first century to tell a single story with the possessive force of an origin myth. Beginning with My Brilliant Friend, published in the U.S. two years ago, they’re ruminatively narrated by a writer named Elena, who looks back upon a defining, lifelong bond with the “terrible, dazzling” Lila, whom she meets in first grade.

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10 Genre-Fiction Novels You Might Have Missed - Den of Geek (US)

10 Genre-Fiction Novels You Might Have Missed - Den of Geek (US) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Den of Geek (US)

10 Genre-Fiction Novels You Might Have Missed

 

Here are ten fast-paced genre reads, all published in the last decade, that you may have missed and will keep you hooked.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Because you can never have too many book recommendations

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