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Garrett Offers First Literary-Historical Analysis of the Episode in New Book - Wesleyan Connection (blog)

Garrett Offers First Literary-Historical Analysis of the Episode in New Book - Wesleyan Connection (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Garrett Offers First Literary-Historical Analysis of the Episode in New Book

Wesleyan Connection (blog)

 

Matthew Garrett, assistant professor of English, is the author of Episodic Poetics: Politics and Literary Form after the Constitution, published by Oxford University Press in April 2014.

 

In Episodic Poetics, Garrett merges narrative theory with social and political history to explain the early American fascination with the episodic, piecemeal plot.

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'Talking to Ourselves' an Affecting Examination of Death - Harvard Crimson

'Talking to Ourselves' an Affecting Examination of Death
Harvard Crimson

 

“Talking To Ourselves” takes a remarkably long time to read for a 150-page novel. At first glance, Andrés Neuman’s follow-up to his acclaimed epic “Traveler of the Century” has an easily navigable structure: it follows the brief and concurrent monologues of a mother (Elena), father (Mario), and son (Lito) as they experience Mario’s illness at the hands of an aggressive cancer. Yet Neuman, who crafts a different form of interior communication for each character—writing for Elena, voice recording for Mario, and thought for Lito—captures the cadences and mental progressions of his characters so accurately that it is necessary to read the book at the same pace one would hear speech. Each character is astonishingly consistent and life-like. Elena’s writings, buoyed by her knowledge of literature, are erratic and gorgeous ruminations on the confusing facets of illness. Her husband’s tape recordings to his son are heartbreaking and unsettlingly honest. And 10 year-old Lito’s thoughts are full of an innocence and sense of wonder that creates an inevitable yearning for youth. Neuman ties together his characters’ thoughts with an effective and chronologically elastic narrative, which magnifies the already staggering emotional and technical depth of his unforgettable “Talking to Ourselves.”

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Mentally ill in literature - University of Virginia The Cavalier Daily

Mentally ill in literature - University of Virginia The Cavalier Daily | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Mentally ill in literature
University of Virginia The Cavalier Daily

 

Some of the most memorable characters in classic American literature suffer from severe mental illness — Benjy Compson, Edna Pontellier, Holden Caulfield and Lennie Small. In a way, their illnesses give them a certain charm and realism which more stereotypical stock characters tend to lack. However, it raises questions about what the use of mental illness as a plot point says about American society and readers’ treatment of mental illness.

 

The portrayal of mental illness in the arts plays a substantial role in how society views it, as literature often reflects the values of its time. In the above four examples, each takes on a different mental illness and represents it in a distinct light.

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Literary legacy contributes to sense of community - Arizona Daily Star

Literary legacy contributes to sense of community - Arizona Daily Star | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Literary legacy contributes to sense of community
Arizona Daily Star

 

Harold Bell Wright was among the most popular American authors of his time, penning 19 novels — with 15 of them making their way to the silver screen.'

 

In 1930, The New York Times called Wright “the narrator of the hopes and dreams of the great mass of American readers from New York to California.”

 

Many of those hopes and dreams came to life on the pages of books Wright wrote from the beloved desert home he built, eight miles east of downtown Tucson. Constructed in the early 1920s, Wright made Tucson his home until signs of encroaching development caused him to flee to California in 1936.

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4 songs you had no idea were inspired by Gabriel García Márquez - Salon

4 songs you had no idea were inspired by Gabriel García Márquez - Salon | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Salon

4 songs you had no idea were inspired by Gabriel García Márquez

 

Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s monumental influence in Latin America and the world wasn’t confined to literature. His words and the lives of his characters were also the driving forces behind several iconic songs about love and loss.

 

Artists from Colombian diva Shakira, to Cuban crooner Silvio Rodriguez to Spanish rocker Joaquin Sabina all penned verses inspired by the Colombian writer known fondly as Gabo and his vast cast of characters from novels such as “One Hundred Years of Solitude.”

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Rage Against the Machine: A Brief History of Evil Movie Computers - RollingStone.com

Rage Against the Machine: A Brief History of Evil Movie Computers - RollingStone.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
RollingStone.com

Rage Against the Machine: A Brief History of Evil Movie Computers

 

Nor does Hollywood miss a moment to skewer the technological future in the name of entertainment. Transcendence adds another notch to the legacy of "Evil Computer" movies, a 2.0 sub-genre that's made room for sci-fi handwringers and paranoid thrillers while clinging to Frankenstein's brand of pseudo-science. The advent of computers in the '50s and '60s opened new doors for the technophobes and offered a great unknown within our reach. That made it terrifying, and more importantly for filmmakers, real.

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The genre debate: Science fiction travels farther than literary fiction - The Guardian

The genre debate: Science fiction travels farther than literary fiction - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian

The genre debate: Science fiction travels farther than literary fiction

 

Speculative fiction prompts the reader to pay so much more attention, looking for the details that make sense of this strange world. Reading speculative fiction isn't arriving in Manchester. It's finding yourself in Outer Mongolia with no help from Lonely Planet or a Rough Guide.

 

Which is why, done well, speculative fiction can be considerably harder to write than literary fiction. I can tell you from experience, as an author, as a reviewer, and after spending two years as a judge for the Arthur C Clarke Award and reading around 150 novels, that when readers are paying that much close attention to every hint and clue, the writer needs to have their internal logic, consistency of character and scene-setting absolutely nailed down. Readers have to be convinced that this unfamiliar world is solidly real if they're ever going to suspend disbelief and accept the unreal, whether that's magic and dragons or faster-than-light travel.

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Edgar Allan Poe's Death, How Edgar Allan Poe Died, What Killed Edgar Allan Poe? | The Medical Bag

Edgar Allan Poe's Death, How Edgar Allan Poe Died, What Killed Edgar Allan Poe? | The Medical Bag | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The death of Edgar Allan Poe has remained a mystery for over 160 years. From the day he was found delirious on a wooden plank outside Ryan’s Saloon on Lombard St. in Baltimore on October 3 by Joseph Walker, the mystery has only deepened.
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Donna Leon: 'I had the good sense to make Brunetti someone I liked' - Irish Times

Donna Leon: 'I had the good sense to make Brunetti someone I liked' - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Donna Leon: 'I had the good sense to make Brunetti someone I liked'
Irish Times

 

Was this a bit of mischief on Leon’s part: to deliberately make him the antithesis of the crime-fiction stereotype? “It was pure chance,” she says. “All I wanted to do was write one book. I had no idea that there would be 23 of them. I got the idea of the murder of a conductor, and I wondered if I could write a murder-mystery about it. And so I did. But I had the good sense, even then, to make him someone that I liked. A nice guy and an intellectually and ethically interesting man.”

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

About Donna Leon's series of mysteries, set in Venice, featuring Commissario Brunetti. The latest book, "By Its Cover," deals with the theft of valuable literary texts.

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How Literature Creates A More Moral Future CEO - Fast Company

How Literature Creates A More Moral Future CEO - Fast Company | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Fast Company
How Literature Creates A More Moral Future CEO

 

The class and the way it’s structured are part of Badaracco’s crusade to balance the left brain side of things with literature that helps his future MBAs learn how to deal with the ethical gray areas, competing interests and multiple points of view they’ll encounter during their careers. The analysis is possible among his students because they’re studying characters whose idiosyncrasies, motivations and inner dialogue are all right there on the page.

 

Which means that, in Badaracco’s class, the understanding of what makes a good leader starts with searching for truth in works of fiction.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

About a class called "The Moral Leader" taught by Harvard Business School professor Joseph Badaracco

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Teaching and Fantasy Literature: Worlds Without End - Black Gate

Teaching and Fantasy Literature: Worlds Without End - Black Gate | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In short fiction, I am similarly leery of sci-fi. The world-building component gives me the Romulan heebie-jeebies. I like to think I handle exposition with adroit grace, but by the polar caps of Mars, I have trouble handling the ...
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Advice from a writing instructor on writing science fiction (with a little help from Anne Lamott)

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The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science Fiction - The Atlantic

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science Fiction - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Atlantic

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science Fiction

 

The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.

 

This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But "genre" is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.

 

And now, a qualitative distinction creeps in. The assumption is made that the stuff on the “general fiction” shelves is the serious stuff—after all, it includes the literary greats—while the stuff cordoned off in those corners is, by definition, light, inconsequential, or even trashy.

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Libreria Donceles adds Hispanic layer to downtown literary scene - Downtown Devil

Libreria Donceles adds Hispanic layer to downtown literary scene - Downtown Devil | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Downtown Devil

Libreria Donceles adds Hispanic layer to downtown literary scene

 

Combine Studios, the site of ASU’s International Art Museum Artist Residency Program, is now the temporary home of Libreria Donceles, Phoenix’s only used Spanish-language bookstore.

. . .

The books at Libreria Donceles are written in Spanish by Spanish-speaking authors. The selection differs greatly compared to translated works found in English-language bookstores, said the exhibit curator Julio Cesar Morales.

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Doug Underwood scouts border between fiction, journalism in new book - UW Today

Doug Underwood scouts border between fiction, journalism in new book - UW Today | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
UW Today
Doug Underwood scouts border between fiction, journalism in new book

 

Doug Underwood is a University of Washington professor of communication. He answered a few questions about his latest book, “The Undeclared War between Fiction and Journalism: Journalists as Genre Benders in Literary History.”

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Psychology And Cognitive Aspects Of Reading

By Tomas Bouda @tombouda #beautmobapps | Psychology, cognitive psychology, neuroergonomics and many other research fields which affect a way we read.
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Redefining the Mother Nature Myth - Ecology Global Network

Redefining the Mother Nature Myth - Ecology Global Network | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Ecology Global Network

Redefining the Mother Nature Myth

 

But as revealed in a conversation between Ecopsychologist Lori Pye and Depth Psychologist Ginette Paris, the idea of Nature as Mother is a deep-seated complex, rooted in the human subconscious and creating the despair felt by so many. Ginette describes the Mother Complex as “Mother projected onto nature as an infinite resource, a boundless safety net.”

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Is reading too much bad for kids? | Al Jazeera America

Is reading too much bad for kids? | Al Jazeera America | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Opponents to deep, immersive reading come from all directions. Among American boys, there remains a generations-old sense that books are for sissies; I remember this from my own childhood. For neoliberals and technocrats, reading novels is not “what the market wants.” Concentrated reading doesn’t require ideological opposition to be endangered: The pace of contemporary life, even for children, means that there’s simply no time or energy left for it. 

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'Updike' explores how reality inspires fiction - Stevenspointjournal

'Updike' explores how reality inspires fiction - Stevenspointjournal | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
'Updike' explores how reality inspires fiction
Stevenspointjournal

 

Ultimately, Updike's own life is not as interesting - or knowable - as the inner life of many of his characters. The more I read about Updike, the more I wanted to go back and read Updike. As Begley writes, "The great stack of books Updike left behind is the monument that matters most."

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Vertical Seminar in the Humanities gives professors, students new analysis tools - Washington University in St. Louis News

Vertical Seminar in the Humanities gives professors, students new analysis tools - Washington University in St. Louis News | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Washington University in St. Louis News
Vertical Seminar in the Humanities gives professors, students new analysis tools

 

Technology is revolutionizing more than just how we shop, communicate and entertain ourselves. It is also changing how humanists analyze texts in a growing field called the digital humanities.

 

Now, scholars of literature and history can take thousands of digitized texts and use a variety of computational tools to engage in what some have called distant reading, a supplement to the close analyses that long have formed the basis of literary criticism or historical inquiry.

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» How Reading Lights Up Your Mind - World of Psychology

» How Reading Lights Up Your Mind - World of Psychology | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Can reading take us to another world? What are the differences in brain activity between distracted skimming, versus captivated and engaged reading.

 

When reading in a focused and engaged manner, a number of different brain regions are transformed, including those associated with touch and movement. Phillips suggests that it is as though readers are placing themselves within the story as they read it.

 

This study adds to a growing body of research on attention and the brain. In the new interdisciplinary field of literary neuroscience, researchers are studying the rhythm of poetry and how metaphor activates sensory regions of the brain.

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The Top 10 Thought-Provoking Science Fiction Films - PopMatters

The Top 10 Thought-Provoking Science Fiction Films - PopMatters | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
PopMatters

The Top 10 Thought-Provoking Science Fiction Films

 

[with] the attempted intelligence of Johnny Depp’s upcoming Transcendence preparing to perplex moviegoers, we believe it’s time to remember the movies that made science fiction one of our favorite cinematic stops in the first place. Again, we aren’t dealing with films that use space or extraterrestrial intelligence (or science, or computers, or whatever) as a means of basically reinventing the action film. Nor are we arguing art vs. approach here. We take the “thought-provoking” part of this piece’s title very seriously.

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Literary Archaeology – The Craft of Historical Research with Hazel ...

Literary Archaeology – The Craft of Historical Research with Hazel ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Writing historical fiction means merging two stories into one. The factual, what actually happened, and the story you want to tell the reader. Today’s guest, Hazel Gaynor, wrote a novel inspired by true events of the Titanic’s fateful crossing.  She shares her insight on historical research and gives us tips on how to weave fact with fiction. 

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Beyond The Snow Leopard: Peter Matthiessen's long legacy of fiction and non-fiction

Beyond The Snow Leopard: Peter Matthiessen's long legacy of fiction and non-fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Born in 1927, Matthiessen is remembered for co-founding The Paris Review literary magazine in the 1950s but he also enjoyed a long writing career where he effortlessly switched between fiction and non-fiction. His best known book is The Snow Leopard, published in 1978, but he was also acclaimed for his 2008 novel, Shadow Country, which is a reworking of an earlier trilogy of novels. His writing on nature and conservation, which ranged from birdlife to sharks, has been highly influential on the modern environmental movement.

 

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'Downs' Reaches Great Heights - Harvard Crimson

'Downs' Reaches Great Heights

Harvard Crimson

 

Getting lost within the pages of a book can be an incredibly rewarding experience, but what happens when obsession goes too far? In his second novel, Boston writer Jaime Clarke explores the darker side of literary admiration. The result is “Vernon Downs,” a stunning and unsettling foray into a glamorous world of celebrity writers, artistic loneliness, and individual desperation.

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Wolves Don't Really Howl at the Moon - Slate Magazine (blog)

Wolves Don't Really Howl at the Moon - Slate Magazine (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog)

Wolves Don't Really Howl at the Moon

 

Of all the myths that dog the wolf, none is more widely accepted than the idea that wolves howl at the moon. Images of wolves with their heads upturned, singing at the night sky, are as unquestioned as a goldfish’s three-second memory or a dog’s color-blindness (both also myths). There are countless depictions of moon howling in faux Native American tchotchkes; the scene also appears in Jack London novels and at least one Los Angeles piano bar. This curious fiction has become so quotidian that even The New Yorker’s legendary fact checkers let “a long, lamenting howl at the orange moon” slide into print without a second thought.

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