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Edgar Allan Poe's Death, How Edgar Allan Poe Died, What Killed Edgar Allan Poe? | The Medical Bag

Edgar Allan Poe's Death, How Edgar Allan Poe Died, What Killed Edgar Allan Poe? | The Medical Bag | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The death of Edgar Allan Poe has remained a mystery for over 160 years. From the day he was found delirious on a wooden plank outside Ryan’s Saloon on Lombard St. in Baltimore on October 3 by Joseph Walker, the mystery has only deepened.
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Donna Leon: 'I had the good sense to make Brunetti someone I liked' - Irish Times

Donna Leon: 'I had the good sense to make Brunetti someone I liked' - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Donna Leon: 'I had the good sense to make Brunetti someone I liked'
Irish Times

 

Was this a bit of mischief on Leon’s part: to deliberately make him the antithesis of the crime-fiction stereotype? “It was pure chance,” she says. “All I wanted to do was write one book. I had no idea that there would be 23 of them. I got the idea of the murder of a conductor, and I wondered if I could write a murder-mystery about it. And so I did. But I had the good sense, even then, to make him someone that I liked. A nice guy and an intellectually and ethically interesting man.”

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

About Donna Leon's series of mysteries, set in Venice, featuring Commissario Brunetti. The latest book, "By Its Cover," deals with the theft of valuable literary texts.

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How Literature Creates A More Moral Future CEO - Fast Company

How Literature Creates A More Moral Future CEO - Fast Company | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Fast Company
How Literature Creates A More Moral Future CEO

 

The class and the way it’s structured are part of Badaracco’s crusade to balance the left brain side of things with literature that helps his future MBAs learn how to deal with the ethical gray areas, competing interests and multiple points of view they’ll encounter during their careers. The analysis is possible among his students because they’re studying characters whose idiosyncrasies, motivations and inner dialogue are all right there on the page.

 

Which means that, in Badaracco’s class, the understanding of what makes a good leader starts with searching for truth in works of fiction.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

About a class called "The Moral Leader" taught by Harvard Business School professor Joseph Badaracco

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Teaching and Fantasy Literature: Worlds Without End - Black Gate

Teaching and Fantasy Literature: Worlds Without End - Black Gate | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
In short fiction, I am similarly leery of sci-fi. The world-building component gives me the Romulan heebie-jeebies. I like to think I handle exposition with adroit grace, but by the polar caps of Mars, I have trouble handling the ...
Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Advice from a writing instructor on writing science fiction (with a little help from Anne Lamott)

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The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science Fiction - The Atlantic

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science Fiction - The Atlantic | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Atlantic

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science Fiction

 

The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.

 

This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But "genre" is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.

 

And now, a qualitative distinction creeps in. The assumption is made that the stuff on the “general fiction” shelves is the serious stuff—after all, it includes the literary greats—while the stuff cordoned off in those corners is, by definition, light, inconsequential, or even trashy.

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Libreria Donceles adds Hispanic layer to downtown literary scene - Downtown Devil

Libreria Donceles adds Hispanic layer to downtown literary scene - Downtown Devil | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Downtown Devil

Libreria Donceles adds Hispanic layer to downtown literary scene

 

Combine Studios, the site of ASU’s International Art Museum Artist Residency Program, is now the temporary home of Libreria Donceles, Phoenix’s only used Spanish-language bookstore.

. . .

The books at Libreria Donceles are written in Spanish by Spanish-speaking authors. The selection differs greatly compared to translated works found in English-language bookstores, said the exhibit curator Julio Cesar Morales.

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Literary Tourism: Baltimore, Maryland - BOOK RIOT

Literary Tourism: Baltimore, Maryland - BOOK RIOT | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Baltimore: it is indeed a bookish kind of town.

 

 I’m back with a much more extensive tour of “Charm City,” with its bookstores and libraries, literary monuments and author houses, fairs and festivals. After all, this is the city that named its football team the “Ravens,” after Edgar Allan Poe’s famous poem. It doesn’t get much more bookish than that, hon.

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Daphne du Maurier 'overlooked' by literary critics, her son says - Telegraph.co.uk

Daphne du Maurier 'overlooked' by literary critics, her son says - Telegraph.co.uk | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk

Daphne du Maurier 'overlooked' by literary critics, her son says

 

Her dark, macabre tales of Gothic romance and revenge have enthralled millions of readers and remain in print decades after her death.


But for Daphne du Maurier, the wealth and worldwide fame she earned from novels such as Rebecca and Jamaica Inn were a poor substitute for the acclaim she craved from literary critics who dismissed her as a second-rank “romantic novelist”.


Now her only son, Kits Browning, speaking for the first time ahead of the BBC’s three-part adaptation of Jamaica Inn, has criticised the “Hampstead literati” for overlooking one of the last century’s most original literary talents.

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Voices: Mapping literary journeys - Herald Times Reporter

Voices: Mapping literary journeys - Herald Times Reporter | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Voices: Mapping literary journeys
Herald Times Reporter

 

In the humanities fields, scholars are using digital tools to create new ways of exploring existing information. In my field of literature, some scholars use GIS technology to map significant landmarks in works of literature. The website Placing Literature: Where Your Book Meets the Map is a collaboration between readers, an author, a Geography scholar, and a software engineer. This project allows readers to map significant places in literature, creating a map for others to use. 

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Read how Jessica Lyn Van Slooten, associate professor in the English Department and in the Women's Studies Program at the University of Wisconsin-Manitowoc, incorporates technology use into her courses.

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Why the English novel is no longer English - Aljazeera.com

Why the English novel is no longer English - Aljazeera.com | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Why the English novel is no longer English
Aljazeera.com

 

Some of our best novels of the late 20th and early 21st century have charted the experience of our immigrants - such as Andrea Levy's prize-winning Small Island, about the experience of young Jamaicans in London around World War II.

 

This isn't literary fashion of the moment; it's the reflection of a changing Britain, one in which more than 10 percent of the population are from ethnic minorities.

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Staying a step ahead of the pack - Herald Scotland

Staying a step ahead of the pack - Herald Scotland | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Herald Scotland
Staying a step ahead of the pack

 

John Connolly mixes hints of melodrama and horror into his crime novels, but keeps them grounded in reality, asking questions about the morality of the world - which leads to some tricky letters from readers.

. . .

This is part of the power of Connolly's writing. Readers are allowed to contemplate something of reality through the escapism of the more fantastic elements, allowing Connolly to ask often complex questions about the world, and the morality of action or inaction.

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Books that inspired punk - Marshfield News-Herald

Books that inspired punk - Marshfield News-Herald | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Books that inspired punk
Marshfield News-Herald

 

Punk began in the mid-1970s as a total rebellion against rock music of the time. Rock had become overdone, with long complicated guitar solos that were accompanied by full orchestrations; the rock stars were flying in private jets with the Queen; and fans had to pay a fortune to squint at the act from the back of a stadium. Punk aimed to bring the music back to the people. To play punk all you needed was to, as Sid Vicious said, "just pick a chord, go twang, and you've got music."

 

Unfortunately, that lack of emphasis on expertise has caused many to regard punk as not the most intelligent of genres-yet that couldn't be farther from the truth. Aside from the advanced political attitudes that punk came to represent, the genre is bursting with literary influence.

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Malamud's Magic - The Jewish Week

Malamud's Magic - The Jewish Week | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Malamud's Magic
The Jewish Week

 

Finally: with the publication of two handsome volumes (and a third in the works) of the novels and short stories of Bernard Malamud (1914-1986), the Library of America has at long last welcomed into its pantheon of American literary greats the Brooklyn-born author of such well-known works of fiction as “The Natural” (yup, the source for the blockbuster baseball movie starring Robert Redford), “The Fixer” (which won the Pulitzer Prize and also spawned a movie, this one starring Alan Bates), “The Assistant,” and others. 

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The Top 10 Thought-Provoking Science Fiction Films - PopMatters

The Top 10 Thought-Provoking Science Fiction Films - PopMatters | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
PopMatters

The Top 10 Thought-Provoking Science Fiction Films

 

[with] the attempted intelligence of Johnny Depp’s upcoming Transcendence preparing to perplex moviegoers, we believe it’s time to remember the movies that made science fiction one of our favorite cinematic stops in the first place. Again, we aren’t dealing with films that use space or extraterrestrial intelligence (or science, or computers, or whatever) as a means of basically reinventing the action film. Nor are we arguing art vs. approach here. We take the “thought-provoking” part of this piece’s title very seriously.

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Literary Archaeology – The Craft of Historical Research with Hazel ...

Literary Archaeology – The Craft of Historical Research with Hazel ... | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Writing historical fiction means merging two stories into one. The factual, what actually happened, and the story you want to tell the reader. Today’s guest, Hazel Gaynor, wrote a novel inspired by true events of the Titanic’s fateful crossing.  She shares her insight on historical research and gives us tips on how to weave fact with fiction. 

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Beyond The Snow Leopard: Peter Matthiessen's long legacy of fiction and non-fiction

Beyond The Snow Leopard: Peter Matthiessen's long legacy of fiction and non-fiction | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Born in 1927, Matthiessen is remembered for co-founding The Paris Review literary magazine in the 1950s but he also enjoyed a long writing career where he effortlessly switched between fiction and non-fiction. His best known book is The Snow Leopard, published in 1978, but he was also acclaimed for his 2008 novel, Shadow Country, which is a reworking of an earlier trilogy of novels. His writing on nature and conservation, which ranged from birdlife to sharks, has been highly influential on the modern environmental movement.

 

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'Downs' Reaches Great Heights - Harvard Crimson

'Downs' Reaches Great Heights

Harvard Crimson

 

Getting lost within the pages of a book can be an incredibly rewarding experience, but what happens when obsession goes too far? In his second novel, Boston writer Jaime Clarke explores the darker side of literary admiration. The result is “Vernon Downs,” a stunning and unsettling foray into a glamorous world of celebrity writers, artistic loneliness, and individual desperation.

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Wolves Don't Really Howl at the Moon - Slate Magazine (blog)

Wolves Don't Really Howl at the Moon - Slate Magazine (blog) | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog)

Wolves Don't Really Howl at the Moon

 

Of all the myths that dog the wolf, none is more widely accepted than the idea that wolves howl at the moon. Images of wolves with their heads upturned, singing at the night sky, are as unquestioned as a goldfish’s three-second memory or a dog’s color-blindness (both also myths). There are countless depictions of moon howling in faux Native American tchotchkes; the scene also appears in Jack London novels and at least one Los Angeles piano bar. This curious fiction has become so quotidian that even The New Yorker’s legendary fact checkers let “a long, lamenting howl at the orange moon” slide into print without a second thought.

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A brief survey of the short story:: Jean Rhys - The Guardian

A brief survey of the short story:: Jean Rhys - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian
A brief survey of the short story:: Jean Rhys

 

"Too bitter," Jean Rhys said of her work in 1945. "And besides, who wants short stories?" No one did then, at least not hers. Rhys published her first collection in 1927, and her first novel the following year. In the 1930s came three increasingly dark and accomplished novels, but the better she got, the less she was read. She published nothing for 20 years, until stories began appearing in the London Magazine in the early 1960s. In 1966, her final novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, brought her acclaim and a degree of financial security at the age of 76. Another two short-story collections appeared before her death in 1979. They include some of the best British short stories of the last century.

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Duras: the searing art of disintegration - Buenos Aires Herald

The New Indian Express
Duras: the searing art of disintegration
Buenos Aires Herald

 

Freud would draw the line between a painter and a sculptor’s work: the former creates by adding layers of colour while the latter extracts chunks of matter. “Then you will see,” Duras would say, “that I write as one must, or so it seems to me: I write for nothing.”


She wrote and loved what she would write. Shedding history, mental reservations and destiny, she would also obsess over how those other people — who didn’t write — spent their time. She had even reached the point of sifting any and all experience through the inevitable sieve of literature, even the most sombre of occurrences. For her, writing had managed to inhabit a parallel universe oozing its interchanging flow in the here-and-now.

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2014 arts Pulitzer Prizes go to Annie Baker, John Luther Adams, Donna Tartt ... - Washington Post

2014 arts Pulitzer Prizes go to Annie Baker, John Luther Adams, Donna Tartt ... - Washington Post | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
Washington Post
2014 arts Pulitzer Prizes go to Annie Baker, John Luther Adams, Donna Tartt ...
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Books as films in 2014 - Irish Times

Books as films in 2014 - Irish Times | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it

Books as films in 2014
Irish Times

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Top 10 books about missing persons - The Guardian

Top 10 books about missing persons - The Guardian | Literature & Psychology | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Top 10 books about missing persons

 

From Gillian Flynn's blockbuster Gone Girl to a re-reading of Nabokov, novelist Laura Lippman tracks down the 10 best books about mysterious disappearances

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

The wonderful Laura Lippman's latest novel is "After I'm Gone."

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Film — The Humanism in “Her” - The Daily Princetonian (blog)

Film — The Humanism in “Her”
The Daily Princetonian (blog)

 

The premise of “Her” is that a lonely man named Theodore, played in an extraordinarily nuanced performance by Joaquin Phoenix, falls in love with his operating system named Samantha, voiced by Scarlett Johansson. By then, artificial intelligence has become so advanced that talking Samantha is essentially indistinguishable from a conversation with any other human.

 

But the touch of science fiction in this film narrative is actually fairly light. Information about the name of the company that produces the operating system is only mentioned once at the beginning of the film. Whenever Samantha’s character explains how she works, she evades the science and technology direction that the film could have taken to talk about all the new emotions she is feeling. What the movie seems to more thoroughly talk about is not a human’s relationship with technology, but just the changeable nature of relationships in general, and the thesis that all relationships are doomed to end.

Mary Daniels Brown's insight:

Darn. "Her" is another movie I intended to go see but didn't get to it. (Another is "Philomena.") I'll have to check out my TV provider's "on demand" contents.

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On Hiatus

Literature & Psychology is on vacation for a week while I am traveling.

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Christa Wojo's comment, April 5, 6:38 AM
Have a great trip :)