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English with Mr. Bormann: Introduce The Crucible with a QR Code Scavenger Hunt #edchat #engchat

English with Mr. Bormann: Introduce The Crucible with a QR Code Scavenger Hunt #edchat #engchat | Literature | Scoop.it

“@jbormann3: Introduce The Crucible with a QR Code Scavenger Hunt #ozengchat #hsceng #edtech #ipadedu http://t.co/a7XPjQxa”; Love it!

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Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - Winner of Goethe Institute keen in translating world’s modern literature

Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - Winner of Goethe Institute keen in translating world’s modern literature | Literature | Scoop.it

The new works and translations of the Iranian author and translator Mahmud Hosseinizad are to be published. The winner of Goethe Institute is keen in translating the world’s modern literature.


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#CommonCore signals a return of history, civics, literature, science, and the fine arts to elementary schools

#CommonCore signals a return of history, civics, literature, science, and the fine arts to elementary schools | Literature | Scoop.it
Shout it from the rooftops, tell all your friends: The Common Core era signals a return of history, civics, literature, science, and the fine arts to the elementary school curriculum

 

"Student scores on language arts tests are the single most reliable academic predictors of later income. The new language arts standards of the Common Core represent an historic opportunity for beneficial change in American schools—if they are put into effect intelligently.


Via Mel Riddile
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Writer-Fight: The 10 Best Put-Downs in Literary History

Writer-Fight: The 10 Best Put-Downs in Literary History | Literature | Scoop.it
There is a kind of unwritten rule among writers that you don’t criticize colleagues’ work too harshly, because they understand just how hard it is…...
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Byliner

Byliner | Literature | Scoop.it

Discover & discuss great reads by great writers.

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Are the real secrets of Arabic literature lost in translation? - The National

Are the real secrets of Arabic literature lost in translation? - The National | Literature | Scoop.it
Are the real secrets of Arabic literature lost in translation?
Ibrahim Farghali

Sep 29, 2012
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For some years now I have followed reports of any Arabic literature translated into European languages, particularly English, French and German, as well as the recipients of Arabic literary prizes that receive attention from the translation industry.

I would receive these reports in good faith and with an appreciation for those in the West who involve themselves in translating a literature that enjoys no great global popularity.

Today, however, after much observation, I find myself posing two pressing questions: Is it really important that Arabic literature be translated into foreign languages and do these translations honestly lead to the spread of Arabic literature among readers of other languages? I write this as someone whose own work, The Smiles of the Saints, has been translated into English.

My response to these two questions is, I fear, a definite, unequivocal "No".

Taking together all of the Arabic literature we see translated and celebrated today, it is my view that nothing has changed.

These translations have failed to give expression to the true nature of the Arab world's literary output and they have proved unable to bring about any sort of audience for this literature.

Nor do I anticipate this happening in the future, as long as the existing mechanisms for translation continue to operate as they do. In particular, the greatest obstacle facing the translation of Arabic literature is the absence of Arab institutions to fund, publicise and frame a systematic process of translation.

Perhaps it is necessary at this point to remind myself that we are living in what the French philosopher Guy Debord terms "the society of the spectacle"; that profiteering, capitalist imperatives shape values throughout the world, both West and East; that institutions for propagating all-powerful consumer images strive to create markets for generating profit no matter the product and that, as it seems to me, the market for publishing and translation in both Europe and the Arab world is unfortunately no longer an exception to this rule.

But as an Arab author, my purpose here is to state that the Arabic book - exported outside its borders by means of translation, a representative of the Arab society that sent it - has become a victim twice over.

Once, of the superficial, commercial media, concerned with image at the expense of essence, which operates in its Arab country of origin and then again a victim of the image of the "eastern" book which the European literary class attempts to present to the world.

It is quite clear that there is a focus on the topics and not the techniques of writing on the part of publishers today, usually concentrating around subjects such as corruption, the role of Arab women in their societies and sexual relations (particularly in closed societies).

This appears to be driven by a publishing market which offers the western reader an image that says that, while such countries may not possess any "global" writers (in any case, a concept midwifed by Eurocentrism), they nevertheless possess societies that the reader can enjoy getting to know.


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The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers

The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers | Literature | Scoop.it
It's an interesting relationship that book lovers have with the Internet: most would rather read a physical book than something on an iPad or Kindle, and even though an Amazon purchase is just two ...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 6, 2013 11:07 AM

My birthday falls at the end of August. I used to joke about my annual present being the official letter from my district informing me that I was to "get off my butt and get back to work." I'd say it as though it was a bummer.

 

But, truthfully I was always excited by the prospect of at least a dozen or more great ideas I'd come up with that I couldn't wait to try out with my kids. I knonw, referring to my high school students as "my kids" is not the professional terminology. But, they were my kids.

 

It was my extension of the "in parentus locus" responsibilities associated with caring about them. I took those responsibilities seriously. So seriously that when I walked out the door for the last time after nearly 40 years, I actually still regretted the two times I had actually sent a kid to the office for behavior problems that I had failed to find a way to deal with that was effective and at the same time a win-win from the kid's point of view as well as from mine.

 

But, we all know the pressures involved in the job; essay correcting, unreasonable parents, teen angst and egos, policy police, budgetary tug-o-wars, and the natural complications of such a multi-layered hierarchy of decision making whose final word is influenced so much by lay persons with little actual knowledge of the best practices and pedagogies that may or may not be what is the best practice or pedagogy for indivdual students.

 

I have no doubt that these sorts of elements of any job exist. Like most important work, it can be very hard, exhausting, and often frustrating at times.

 

And, we've all seen a veteran or two who have been defeated by these challenges and who have had their original enthusiasm and optimism sucked out of them to the point where the mechanisms they employ to deal with these challenges have become thick fortresses of insulation leaving students and colleagues with little to see of that teacher's original vim, vigor, and caring about both the subject matter and the students.

 

I discovered somewhere along the line that it is important to refresh that caring; to find ways to remember why we became educators. 

 

I came to think of the process as marinating in my love of literature or taking time to go to a literary spa of sorts whether I'd know I'd walk out of that "spa" feeling refreshed and invigorated. Sometimes that "spa" was a real location. A weekend at the Slyvia Beach Hotel (http://www.sylviabeachhotel.com) in Nye Beach, Oregon. Ah! An Oregon hotel on the ocean where every inch and moment is dedicated to book lovers. 

 

In reality, it did not take many "spa" experiences to remind me of my love of reading great literature. But, if one or two a year left me so refreshed, why not 10 or 20 or heck, why not 187 or so as in why not refresh every morning?

 

So I began getting up in time to spend a leisurely 30 minutes or so exploring a story or two at one of the many virtual spas on the internet where book lovers gather to share their love of literature. 

 

Sometimes I'd head off to TED TALKS (http://www.ted.com) and watch an inspiring talk about topics in all areas and remind myself that there was a time in my own youth when I too, like my own students hadn't yet discovered an interest in "this or that other curricular area." And, I'd remember some teacher who had found a way to make a previously "boring" subject fascinating. It might have been Mr. Tinling's geometry class, Ms Alexander's history class, Mr. Muńoz's Civics class. And, like these and other great teachers and like the great TED Talk speakers I would get a daily dose of love of teaching. 

 

How could I get to school and not want to be that kind of a teacher for "my kids"? 

 

It didn't eliminate the challenges. But it kept them in their proper perspective. And, remembering how much I'd come to love literature and how much I owe to those teachers who shared their love of literature in ways that even the reluctant might find unavoidably captivating proved to be just the daily dose I needed to remind me  that caring about "my kids" was the key to keeping the challenges associated with being an educator to be remembered in perspective. 

 

Take a quick look at these websites for literature lovers and think of them as virtual "daily spa treatments" where you just can't help but head off to another day with your kids as refreshed and enthusiastic as they hope all of their teachers will be that day.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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Rescuing literature from literary theory | Sarah Boyes

Rescuing literature from literary theory | Sarah Boyes | Literature | Scoop.it

Terry Eagleton’s attempt to define literature is impressive, but he fails to recognise that this definition is not merely descriptive – it’s also evaluative.

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25 Secrets Of Great Copywriting From Classic Literary Masters - Business 2 Community

25 Secrets Of Great Copywriting From Classic Literary Masters - Business 2 Community | Literature | Scoop.it
Business 2 Community
25 Secrets Of Great Copywriting From Classic Literary Masters
Business 2 Community
Achieving greatness requires developing authentic brand personality, and writing content that people actually want to read.
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