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Editor’s Choice: Knocknagow - Case history of an Irish Best-seller by Seán Ó Faolain

Editor’s Choice: Knocknagow - Case history of an Irish Best-seller by Seán Ó Faolain | Literature | Scoop.it
From the archive: in a story first published in 1941 Seán Ó Faolain takes a close look at why Knocknagow (1879), the novel by Charles Kickham, became such a hit with Irish readers

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Marie Arndt's insight:

Sean O'Faolain had a firm foot in the Irish past, as well as commitment to modernising Ireland. This dicotomy often created contradictions in his discourse, but it adds to making him an interesting writer. His ouvre spans almost the entire 20th century, and reflects the political and social aspects of that era. 

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Kevin Kiely puts boot into Seamus Heaney |

Kevin Kiely puts boot into Seamus Heaney | | Literature | Scoop.it
Heaney:going through the poetic motions Ireland’s timeless bard of farmyard, bogs and prehistory by Kevin Kiely After his death last year the

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An alternative view of a national (which nation though?) treasure.

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Hugh McFadden's curator insight, August 19, 3:21 PM

Divil's advocate ... but it's time that a debate started on Heaney's reputation ...

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Welcome to Open Library

Welcome to Open Library | Literature | Scoop.it

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Deyanira Sequeira's curator insight, July 23, 9:31 AM

un millón de eBooks !

Patricia Daniels's curator insight, July 24, 4:05 AM

Plenty of reading material here in the form of diverse genres and subjects. Books can be read online, downloaded in several formats and even borrowed for a couple of weeks. 

Carlos Lizarraga Celaya's curator insight, July 24, 8:23 AM

Open Library is an open project: the software is open, the data are open, the documentation is open, and we welcome your contribution. Whether you fix a typo, add a book, or write a widget--it's all welcome. We have a small team of fantastic programmers who have accomplished a lot, but we can't do it alone!

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Digital Dubliners - A totally new reading experience

Digital Dubliners - A totally new reading experience | Literature | Scoop.it
A Multimedia Edition

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Karen E Smith's curator insight, July 14, 8:21 AM

Having been on the digital storytelling tour through Ireland, I think this would be a great transliterate experience for students who are going on a storytelling tour with you.

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Reflections: with Brendan Kennelly - YouTube

Made for Masters in Multimedia Digital Video Production (CM558) at Dublin City University. Group: 5 Evan McCaffrey Julie Lynch Margot Cullen Dan Kelleher Pat...

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Seamus Whitty's curator insight, June 17, 9:43 AM

Yep, we all do...

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BBC Radio 4 - Walking with the Dead

BBC Radio 4 - Walking with the Dead | Literature | Scoop.it
Writer Colm Toibin explores the Dublin locations haunted by James Joyce's Dubliners.

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Who Are James Joyce's Modern Heirs? - New York Times

Who Are James Joyce's Modern Heirs? - New York Times | Literature | Scoop.it
Who Are James Joyce's Modern Heirs? New York Times Few declarations of aesthetic autonomy have resonated more in the last century than Stephen Dedalus's in “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”: “You talk to me of nationality, language,...

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Joyce's Dublin » An exploration of ‘The Dead - Podcasst and Multimedia Project

James Joyce is regarded as one of the greatest Irish or Modernist writers, but also more simply as one of the greatest writers in English literature. Born in Dublin in 1882 and educated at University College Dublin (UCD), Joyce left Ireland in 1904, returning only for a few short visits, but his work endlessly explores the country, particularly his native Dublin. ‘The Dead’, the final story in Joyce’s 1914 collection Dubliners, is considered one of the finest short stories in the English language but in thinking of it as a magnificent work of art we should not forget that it is a text shaped by a very particular context. Joyce’s great friend, Con Curran, remarked of Joyce that ‘His memory was a map of the town’, and the city of Dublin is vividly present in ‘The Dead’.


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Good to see a contribution to tech edu on literature, as it is by far not as common as e-learning for English language learning. 

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Lit stuff on the net | Rozz.ie-Five Bloggers that give a Great Introduction to the World of Literaturee in Ireland

Lit stuff on the net | Rozz.ie-Five Bloggers that  give a Great Introduction to the World of Literaturee in Ireland | Literature | Scoop.it

SOCIAL MEDIA AND LITERATURE:LIT STUFF ON THE NET

Even though I love reading and real books, I also love my kindle, ipad and samsung note! I’ve been blogging for a few years now and have built up some connections with other lit bloggers, readers and writers. If you want to know who you must follow on twitter, befriend on facebook or subscribe to their blog, then you might want to read my list!


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‘The Last Walk’ by Seamus Heaney

‘The Last Walk’ by Seamus Heaney | Literature | Scoop.it
THE LAST WALK
by
Seamus Heaney
Translations from the Italian
of Giovanni Pascoli
with paintings and drawings by
Martin Gale
On 22 August of this year Seamus Heaney welcomed and enthused about the proofs of a book we planned to publish in November.

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Who can now be considered Ireland's leading poets in the aftermath of Seamus Heaney's passing? Five contemporary Irish poets everyone should read

Who can now be considered Ireland's leading poets in the aftermath of Seamus Heaney's passing? Five contemporary Irish poets everyone should read | Literature | Scoop.it
Originally published in RÍ- Rá, the entertainment supplement of The Irish Post, Saturday 28th September, 2013.  There was a sunlit absence.                                    Seamus Heaney, ‘Mossba...

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The Rising of Bella Casey by Mary Morrissy – Guardian Review

The Rising of Bella Casey by Mary Morrissy – Guardian Review | Literature | Scoop.it
His sister Bella hardly featured in Sean O'Casey's autobiography but Morrissy fills in the missing years

 

The playwright Sean O Casey composed six volumes of autobiography but didn't reserve much space for his sister, Bella, whom he killed off at least a decade earlier than her actual demise during the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918. Fifteen years older, and practically a second mother to him, her principal sin was that of marrying a common soldier, thus throwing away the advantages of an above-average education "for the romance of a crimson coat". Morrissy's novel restores the missing years and invents some fairly convincing extenuating circumstances 


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BCelebrating Louis MacNeice - Michael Longley

Marking the 50th anniversary of the death of poet, Louis MacNeice, poets including Michael Longley paid tribute by reading a selection of MacNeice greatest p...

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H

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Louis MacNeice speaks about, and recites, Bagpipe Music

MacNeice's fun poem about cultural change, written at a time when the folk culture of the Scottish Highlands was being replaced by modern commercialism. Also...

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James Joyce's Ulysses is being adapted into a video game

James Joyce's Ulysses is being adapted into a video game | Literature | Scoop.it
Often considered one of the finest books of the 20th century, James Joyce's 1922 novel Ulysses is akin to the Demon's Souls of English literature wherein on…

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Virtual Ulysses: inhabit the characters of James Joyce’s masterpiece

Virtual Ulysses: inhabit the characters of James Joyce’s masterpiece | Literature | Scoop.it
Dublin film maker Eoghan Kidney gives Ulysses a 21st-century makeover

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Edna Longley wins Rhodes Prize for Literature and Language for "Yeats and Modern Poetry"

Edna Longley wins Rhodes Prize for Literature and Language for "Yeats and Modern Poetry" | Literature | Scoop.it
The American Conference for Irish Studies is pleased to announce the winners of its 2014 book and dissertation prize competitions. ACIS annually recognizes five books and one graduate dissertation ...

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Free Technology for Teachers: Teaching literary terms with comics

Free Technology for Teachers: Teaching literary terms with comics | Literature | Scoop.it

"One of my favorite ways to get students interested in the creative writing process is to have them create comic strips ..."

©


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The end of Yeats: work and women in his last days in France

The end of Yeats: work and women in his last days in France | Literature | Scoop.it
Yeats had a late creative surge – including ‘one of the greatest ever death-bed utterances’ – before he died surrounded by his muses in France 75 years ago

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BBC - Podcasts and Downloads - Remembering Seamus Heaney

BBC - Podcasts and Downloads - Remembering Seamus Heaney | Literature | Scoop.it
A compilation of our special weekend of programming remembering the life and work of Seamus Heaney. We visit many of the...

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Maria Edgeworth, (1768–1849), novelist and educationist, born on 1 January 1768

Maria Edgeworth, (1768–1849), novelist and educationist, born on 1 January 1768 | Literature | Scoop.it

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A Tribute to Seamus Heaney | The Sunday Edition with Michael Enright | CBC Radio

A Tribute to Seamus Heaney | The Sunday Edition with Michael Enright | CBC Radio | Literature | Scoop.it
He was the most famous poet in the world.

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Editor’s Choice: Knocknagow - Case history of an Irish Best-seller by Seán Ó Faolain

Editor’s Choice: Knocknagow - Case history of an Irish Best-seller by Seán Ó Faolain | Literature | Scoop.it
From the archive: in a story first published in 1941 Seán Ó Faolain takes a close look at why Knocknagow (1879), the novel by Charles Kickham, became such a hit with Irish readers

Via Gerard Beirne
Marie Arndt's insight:

Sean O'Faolain had a firm foot in the Irish past, as well as commitment to modernising Ireland. This dicotomy often created contradictions in his discourse, but it adds to making him an interesting writer. His ouvre spans almost the entire 20th century, and reflects the political and social aspects of that era. 

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Art | New Yorker’s Paul Muldoon pays tribute to the late Irish poet Seamus Heaney

Art | New Yorker’s Paul Muldoon pays tribute to the late Irish poet Seamus Heaney | Literature | Scoop.it
The New Yorker's poetry editor Paul Muldoon will pay tribute to Nobel Prize-winning Irish poet, playwright and lecturer Seamus Heaney on Monday, November 4 at 7:00 pm at Off-Broadway's award-winnin...

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Writer Colum McCann proposes a "reimagining" of what it means to be Irish

Writer Colum McCann proposes a "reimagining" of what it means to be Irish | Literature | Scoop.it

In his address to the Global Irish Forum in Dublin Castle, writer Colum McCann talks about Irish identity and proposes a "reimagining" of what it means to be Irish.

"There is a lovely Portuguese word, "saudade", which indicates a person or place or object that draws out of us our most extreme or improbable yearning. It is a feeling for something that is gone, but might one day return.

"This, I hope, is an appropriate word for those generations of us who have been described as belonging to the Diaspora: we with our vagrant voices, we who sometimes think that the only home we have is our names, we who are both here and there at the same time.


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Identity is, indeed, a very subjective word, and means different things for those of us who live elsewhere, in a different place from where we were born or grew up. Some change their identity over time, as thier relationship to their original point of reference changes, others retain the one identity. It dependson our flexibility and willingness to evolve over time. 

 

 

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Animals and the Irish Mouth in Edna O’Brien’s Fiction | O'Connor | Journal of Ecocriticism

From Edna O’Brien’s earliest novels, many commentators have noted that desire is at the core of the narratives. The true irony in such observations lies in their frequently blinkered understanding of what comprises that desire, reducing it to a heteronormative, Barbara-Cartland-style pursuit of “romance.” While the characters themselves may think this is what they hunger for, the text inevitably opens up vaster sources of insatiable longing. As Mary Douglas has established, “the body is capable of furnishing a natural system of symbols” (xxxii), and in O’Brien’s texts the human mouth, especially when at its most “animal,” metonymizes numerous desires, most often balked and even impossible ones, including those that actuate the scene of writing. Mouths are everywhere in O’Brien’s novels, licking, yawning, weeping, swallowing, keening, grimacing, biting, shrieking, chewing, singing, speaking, and opening in silence. These mouths give voice to the immaterial, and even animate the inorganic, which, for all of its immateriality, can yet resist manipulation. The inscrutable “inhuman” voice that emerges ultimately reveals “that words themselves are sphinxes, hybrids of the animal, the human, and the inorganic” (Ellmann 77).

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