Literature
20 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Soundtrack
Scoop.it!

The Tragic Emptiness of 'The Great Gatsby' | The Atlantic Wire

The Tragic Emptiness of 'The Great Gatsby' | The Atlantic Wire | Literature | Scoop.it
While certainly not a disaster, Baz Lurhrmann's opulent adaptation begins to look and feel like something grand and profound, before transforming into a decidedly unthoughtful stagger through familiar territory.

Via Christopher Coleman
more...
Christopher Coleman's curator insight, May 8, 2013 10:18 PM

Sounds like the HIGH POINT is Craig Armstrong's original score...


" But it's what composer Craig Armstrong does with those tunes, turning them into orchestral riffs that haunt and envelop, that's really striking. When that music swells and the green light burns, the picture feels truly 3D, immersive and captivating. But unfortunately those moments are increasingly few and fleeting. "

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Le It e Amo ✪
Scoop.it!

#100 #novels #should #read

#100 #novels #should #read | Literature | Scoop.it
100 The Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkein WH Auden thought this tale of fantastic creatures looking for lost jewellery was a “masterpiece”. 99 To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee A child’s-eye view ...

Via Leggo Tung Lei
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from OffStage
Scoop.it!

Tallgrass Theatre Company brings "To Kill a Mockingbird" to Gardner stage - examiner.com

Tallgrass Theatre Company brings "To Kill a Mockingbird" to Gardner stage - examiner.com | Literature | Scoop.it
Harper Lee’s classic story, To Kill a Mockingbird, adapted for the stage by Christopher Sergel, comes to Wheatridge Middle School’s Auditorium for a weekend run

Via KCStage
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

What Makes You Keep Reading?

What Makes You Keep Reading? | Literature | Scoop.it

After reading a certain blue, white and black book written by John Green in a single day, I started thinking. Truth is, the only thing The Fault in Our Stars has in common with most of the books I read is that it happens to be a YA novel. There aren't any high-action scenes or evil villains to destroy or superpowers or magic or spaceships or horrific dystopian societies that must be overturned.

 

And yet, I whipped through its 318 pages like nobody's business and loved every moment of it. So it got me thinking: what really makes readers keep reading?


Via mooderino
more...
Gabbie J's curator insight, May 9, 2014 2:08 PM

I found this website to be very interesting , I love and enjoy reading but why?This site gives me sort of an explanation on why I do , though I don't think anybody can find out the true meaning of loving to do something. But at least this gets us somewhere.

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

Literary experiment has N.J. students learning Steinbeck, life lessons

Literary experiment has N.J. students learning Steinbeck, life lessons | Literature | Scoop.it
Many teachers are feeling pressure regarding the higher text levels that have been sent by the common core.  Here is a article regarding the use of a classic for a heterogeneous group of students - including some great instructional strategies -...

Via Darren Burris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - Translations of John Steinbeck’s works to be released

Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - Translations of John Steinbeck’s works to be released | Literature | Scoop.it
Four books by American writer John Steinbeck’s books namely ‘Once There Was a War’, ‘Cannery Row’, ‘To a God Unknown’ and ‘Burning Bright’, translated by Marzieh Khosravi, will be released in Iran.

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

The Most Famous Author From Every State

The Most Famous Author From Every State | Literature | Scoop.it
From California's John Steinbeck to Maine's Stephen King, here are the most famous authors from every state.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 9, 2013 9:51 AM

I actually debated whether or not to scoop this article. I've long been a bit skeptical about "Best _________" lists of any kind. But, this article doesn't claim these are the best authors, nor does it ignore the possibility that there are other authors of equal or better note. 

 

I was impressed that the article's author actually listed her criteria, giving the reader an opportunity to recognize the "lean" of the evaluative assessment. For example, I suppose "ubiquity, literal acclaim, and financial success" are appropriate criteria for determining fame, though they might not be the most appropriate criteria for evaluating quality. 

 

That's fair.

 

That gives me permission to scoop this article for its interest level. 

 

And it sent me off on a little side trip. As professional literature educators, we have come to recognize that there are titles that are considered the canon of great literature. Most literature taught in schools rely upon an assumption that these are (at least among) the very best of the best and therefore ought to be the at the heart of literary reading's "must teach" books. 

 

Of course there is open debate and continued conversation about the wisdom of sticking (more or less) to the "dead white guys" curriculum. This conversation is perhaps as prevalent in English Department meetings as is the topic of "Kids these days! They just don't read as much as they used to!"

 

And I could not help but wonder...

What if we ignored the fact that this article "picks a winning author" from each state and what if we ignored the fact that this article assigns the "winning authors" by state? Why? Because we all know that each state has many popular and great writers and because we know that it might be spurious reasoning to suggest that we can judge a state's citizens' intellectual level by the author who represents their literary reading choices. For example, Dan Brown is certainly famous. But, we really don't know where his work stands in popularity among the citizens of New Hampshire. We certainly know that Mark Twain and John Steinbeck were often much more popular outside of their home states than inside their home states. 

 

But, what if we simply took this article as a sample data-set of what "average people who DO READ" read?  That's AVERAGE readers, not just the "professional readers" who teach literary reading?

 

Why? Because our "clients" are not all destined to major in English. But they are all destined to make personal decisions about whether or not they will be lifelong readers. 

 

So, what might we cull from this article? Perhaps, we can concentrate on what these authors write about regardless of their reputations among scholars.What do they bring to the conversations about the human condition that is attractive to large portions of the GENERAL population? They are "selling" reading to an impressive cross-section of the population whether it be local, national, or international. 

 

There are those who consider the likes of Stephen King and Dan Brown  "B-List" writers. But, whether or not one is presumptuous enough to offer "better writers than those guys," they are at their essence writing stories containing the very same themes about the nature of the human condition as those on the  assumed "A-List." And, they are reaching millions of people while raising the same esstential questions that we hope all well educated people choose to ponder.

 

What do the most popular writers write about?

 

What do they offer the GENERAL reading populace that many of the "A-list" authors" do not, or perhaps I should say, do not any longer offer to the AVERAGE reading populace? 

 

Perhaps, they are tapping into new forms of engaging contemporary readers as the "A-listers" were able to do in other times and continue to do "less broadly" as the distance between their times and their locations and their proximal relationships grows further from the zones of proximal development grows.

 

Perhaps the order of importance in selecting literature ought to be:

 

Above all else, sell them reading.. 

Then sell them the idea of wanting to read better stories.

Then sell them the idea of wanting to read the best.

 

The concept of The perfect being the enemy of the good, most often attributed to Voltaire, might be worth considering. Certainly the best of the best literature is better than the pretty good. But, let us not forget that the pretty good may be reaching far more people far more successfully than the best of the best does.


 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Children's Literature - Literatura para a infância
Scoop.it!

A collection of Soviet children’s stories becomes a UK bestseller | Russia Beyond The Headlines

A collection of Soviet children’s stories becomes a UK bestseller | Russia Beyond The Headlines | Literature | Scoop.it
“Inside the Rainbow: Beautiful Books, Terrible Times,” published last month by Redstone Press, provides tales from a golden age for Russian children’s literature - the 1920s and 1930s (Soviet children's literature is living through a renaissance

Via Ana Margarida Ramos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Literature for children focus at New Delhi World Book Fair

Literature for children focus at New Delhi World Book Fair | Literature | Scoop.it
New Delhi: Literature for children will be the focus at the upcoming edition of New Delhi World Book Fair...

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 18, 2013 3:34 AM

New Delhi: Literature for children will be the focus at the upcoming edition of New Delhi World Book Fair (NDWBF) with Poland being chosen as the Guest of Honour country. 

"We are happy to join hands with a country like Poland which has had four Nobel laureates in literature. The association will be fascinating and facilitate rich exchange of literature between two countries," said A Sethumadhavan, chairman of National Book Trust (NBT), while speaking at the at the launch of the translation of a Polish book titled 'Little Chopin' here recently. 

"The focus for Delhi World Book Fair 2014 will be literature for children and Poland will showcase children's illustrations through an exhibition and bring books for children," says Anna Tryc-Bromley, director Polish Institute here, part of the Polish diplomatic mission and responsible for promoting Polish culture in India. 

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Young Adult Novels
Scoop.it!

Divergent Trailer Official 2014 Shailene Woodley Movie - 2013 Teaser [HD]

Divergent Trailer 2014 Movie - Official 2013 teaser trailer in HD 1080p - starring Shailene Woodley, Theo James, Jai Courtney, Kate Winslet - directed by Nei...

Via BJ Neary
Antonia Atria's insight:

Maybe this isn't about LITERATURE, but is the dramatization of a great book series. Art is not only in written words, but in the visual expression of it. This is art coming from literature, so yeahk, I will rebel against the 'normal stuff' and scoop this under Luterature.

more...
BJ Neary's curator insight, November 13, 2013 7:52 PM

I just hope it stays true to the book!!!

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

5 of the Best Online Shakespeare Resources

5 of the Best Online Shakespeare Resources | Literature | Scoop.it

Check out five online resources on Shakespeare. The five websites are:

* 60 Second Shakespeare challenge from the BBC

* The Playwright Game from PBS

* Shakespearean Murder Mystery

* Shakespeare App

* Making a Scene -  blog with many ideas on how to bring Shakespeare to life in your classroom


Via Beth Dichter
Antonia Atria's insight:

Really useful information to understanding shakepeare!

more...
Anne-Maree Johnson's curator insight, October 13, 2013 11:15 PM

Some great web sites for use when teaching Shakespeare

Kelly Brenner Smith's curator insight, June 26, 2014 10:42 AM

Check out these resources for reading, understanding, and interpreting works by Shakespeare.

Sumayya Qudrat's curator insight, April 9, 2015 12:01 AM

different shakespeare units to use in a classroom

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Writers & Books
Scoop.it!

Rereading: 'To Kill a Mockingbird' by Harper Lee. An appreciation by novelist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Rereading: 'To Kill a Mockingbird' by Harper Lee. An appreciation by novelist, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie | Literature | Scoop.it

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie celebrates the enduring achievement of Harper Lee's classic novel, which was published 50 years ago


Via bobbygw
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Examples of Empathy in To Kill a Mockingbird

Examples of Empathy in To Kill a Mockingbird | Literature | Scoop.it

Empathy is defined as identifying with another person's feelings, or emotionally placing one's self in the place of another. The trait is a theme in Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird...."

 

The overall character of Atticus Finch is an example of how empathy is used in the novel. He displays empathy in his strong beliefs of racial equality, which was uncommon in the 1930s in Alabama.
by Scott Cornell, img http://bit.ly/qCuGfy


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
Linda Lee Faber's curator insight, January 16, 2014 9:11 AM

Define in your own words; what  is empathy?  Give an example in your life from a movie, book or TV show you have seen.

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

What books are teachers assigning and why?

What books are teachers assigning and why? | Literature | Scoop.it

Because of Winn-Dixie, Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, and To Kill a Mockingbird are among the most popular texts assigned to public-school students, a new report shows.


Via Darren Burris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Young Adult Books
Scoop.it!

Young adult books from page to screen - CNN

Young adult books from page to screen - CNN | Literature | Scoop.it

Young adult book-to-film adaptations are a steady draw for viewers: J.K. Rowling has signed on for yet more Harry Potter films, and a new class of YA novels is set to be adapted to the screen starting in 2014: Veronica Roth's "Divergent," John Green's "The Fault in Our Stars," James Dashner's "The Maze Runner" and Gayle Forman's "If I Stay," to name a few.

 

 


Via Eric Bateman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - Steinbeck's "Cannery Row" to be released in Iran

Iran Book News Agency (IBNA) - Steinbeck's "Cannery Row" to be released in Iran | Literature | Scoop.it

Mehrdad Vosoghi has finished translating a novel by John Steinbeck entitled "Cannery Row" which is indeed one of Steinbeck's sweetest novels.
IBNA: Cannery Row is an English language novel by American author John Steinbeck. It was published in 1945. A film version was released in 1982. A stage version was produced in 1995.

Cannery Row takes place on a street lined with sardine fisheries in Monterey known as Cannery Row (Ocean View Avenue in Monterey, the thinly disguised location, was later re-named "Cannery Row" in honor of the book). It revolves around the people living there during the Great Depression.


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Growing To Be A Better Communicator
Scoop.it!

Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck | Literature | Scoop.it

Now comes John Steinbeck — Pulitzer Prize winner, Nobel laureate, love guru — with six tips on writing, culled from his altogether excellent interview it the Fall 1975 issue ofThe Paris Review.


Via Bobby Dillard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Children's Literature - Literatura para a infância
Scoop.it!

22 Things That Belong In Every Bookworm's Dream Home

22 Things That Belong In Every Bookworm's Dream Home | Literature | Scoop.it
Take my money. All of it.

Via Ana Margarida Ramos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

allAfrica.com: Angola: MP Underscores Importance of Literature in Angolan Society

allAfrica.com: Angola: MP Underscores Importance of Literature in Angolan Society | Literature | Scoop.it
allAfrica: African news and information for a global audience

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 18, 2013 3:24 AM

The Member of Parliament for the Unita bench, Clarice Caputo, Friday in Lubango, southern Huila province, said that literature is part of the academic and professional training of Angolan society.

Speaking to ANGOP, in this city, during the launch of the literary work called "Understanding of Angolan labor law" authored by Apollo Yacuvela, the MP stressed that reading is very important because it aims to enhance scientific and cultural communities on aspects guiding the country and beyond.

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Literature for a Better World

Literature for a Better World | Literature | Scoop.it

Empathy -- our ability to feel for others -- is what allows us to care for each other, to form communities and friendships, to imagine each other's feelings, to commiserate over each other's pain and share in each other's joy. This ability is what makes literature and drama work.

 

Empathy is what provides much of the tension and engagement that one finds in good literature -- and according to a new study publicized in the New York Times, reading literary fiction increases empathy. That study has proven controversial. However, there are a wealth of less-publicized studies that do show a link between fiction reading and empathy.

Emily Atkinson

Graduate Student, Cambridge University


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Antonia Atria from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

On Writing by Stephen King

On Writing by Stephen King | Literature | Scoop.it

If you ask me for a list of my favorite authors, Stephen King won’t be on it. This isn’t because I don’t like his novels. I can’t even read them. I’ve tried, but I’m never able to get past a few pages because the guy is so good at what he does.

“Wimp,” you say, and it’s true. I don’t like horror.

But King’s On Writing (Scribner, 2000) is a gem of a book. I read it a few years ago, and after stumbling across his recent New York Times review of Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, I was reminded of how comfortable his prose feels to me when he’s writing about something that doesn’t terrify me. So this past weekend I gobbled up the book once more, as though it were fresh muscle and I a flesh-eating monster.

Whether or not you like King’s fiction you have to admit he’s successful at his chosen craft, and On Writing gives an idea of how that success came about.

The first part is a memoir of writing, rather than a manual about how to write. King’s father disappeared when he was young. His mother was poor, but she loved her boys and worked hard to raise them. King’s childhood stories give an idea of where some of his ideas come from: a nearby woods where he was debilitated by poison ivy, or the time he and his brother blew out all the electricity in the neighborhood. Another author might have used these seeds in a different way, but for King they are the roots of horror stories. Beginning with a janitorial visit to a girls’ high school locker room, he leads you to how Carrie came about. It’s instructive, both about writing and about King.

Though King’s childhood wasn’t filled with horrors, he managed to screw up a good part of his adulthood by taking drugs and getting drunk. Somehow, though, he wrote. And wrote and wrote and wrote. He’d started submitting stories as a kid and, despite repeated rejections, the guy just wouldn’t quit. People have accused him of being a machine and it must be true, but not in the way they mean it. He turns out so much material because he writes relentlessly. He writes no matter what. He writes.

The second part of On Writing becomes an instruction manual about writing and publishing. I read this part keeping in mind that he was writing before the ubiquity of the internet, the upheavals in the publishing industry, and computers that could store endless information. (He refers a lot to disks.) Much has changed since he was working on this book in the late 1990′s, for Stephen King and for the writing world, but much of what he says is still relevant.

0

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 7, 2013 8:32 AM

If you ask me for a list of my favorite authors, Stephen King won’t be on it. This isn’t because I don’t like his novels. I can’t even read them. I’ve tried, but I’m never able to get past a few pages because the guy is so good at what he does.

“Wimp,” you say, and it’s true. I don’t like horror.

But King’s On Writing (Scribner, 2000) is a gem of a book. I read it a few years ago, and after stumbling across his recent New York Times review of Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, I was reminded of how comfortable his prose feels to me when he’s writing about something that doesn’t terrify me. So this past weekend I gobbled up the book once more, as though it were fresh muscle and I a flesh-eating monster.

Whether or not you like King’s fiction you have to admit he’s successful at his chosen craft, and On Writing gives an idea of how that success came about.

The first part is a memoir of writing, rather than a manual about how to write. King’s father disappeared when he was young. His mother was poor, but she loved her boys and worked hard to raise them. King’s childhood stories give an idea of where some of his ideas come from: a nearby woods where he was debilitated by poison ivy, or the time he and his brother blew out all the electricity in the neighborhood. Another author might have used these seeds in a different way, but for King they are the roots of horror stories. Beginning with a janitorial visit to a girls’ high school locker room, he leads you to how Carrie came about. It’s instructive, both about writing and about King.

Though King’s childhood wasn’t filled with horrors, he managed to screw up a good part of his adulthood by taking drugs and getting drunk. Somehow, though, he wrote. And wrote and wrote and wrote. He’d started submitting stories as a kid and, despite repeated rejections, the guy just wouldn’t quit. People have accused him of being a machine and it must be true, but not in the way they mean it. He turns out so much material because he writes relentlessly. He writes no matter what. He writes.

The second part of On Writing becomes an instruction manual about writing and publishing. I read this part keeping in mind that he was writing before the ubiquity of the internet, the upheavals in the publishing industry, and computers that could store endless information. (He refers a lot to disks.) Much has changed since he was working on this book in the late 1990′s, for Stephen King and for the writing world, but much of what he says is still relevant.

Rescooped by Antonia Atria from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

Filling In For Will - An iPad Game About Shakespeare - iPad Apps for School

Filling In For Will - An iPad Game About Shakespeare - iPad Apps for School | Literature | Scoop.it

"Shakespeare: Filling In For Will is a fun game filled with famous quotes from Shakespeare. In this iPad app players are shown a quote that has a word or two missing from it. They then have to select the word or words that complete the quote. After filling in the quote players are shown the play, act, scene, and character connected to the quote."


Via John Evans
Antonia Atria's insight:

Great way of adding fun to education! The colaboration between technology and literature makes every learning expirience better. Great idea!

more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, November 5, 2013 8:23 AM

To be or not to be?

Ms van Leent's curator insight, December 2, 2013 8:38 PM

Could be fun for juniors!