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Creating Characters - Five Mistakes Beginner Writers Make

Creating Characters - Five Mistakes Beginner Writers Make | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
I am often asked to appraise writers’ manuscripts. I have found that these are the most common problems beginner writers share when they're creating characters.

1. Cardboard cut-out... (These are some really good tips for character writing.
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Two Quick Secrets To Improve Your Writing

Two Quick Secrets To Improve Your Writing | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Here are the steps to writing and editing a book.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 31, 2013 5:41 AM

This is the fourth post in a series about writing a book. Having just finished a new book on body language, brain science, and how people communicate, due out in May 2014 from Harvard, I’m posting a brief series on writing – what I’ve learned.  Is it true that everyone who’s sentient has a book inside waiting to be expressed?  What are the best ways to crank out a book-length manuscript?  And once you have, what about publishing it?  What does that terrain look like?

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5 Tips for NaNoWriMo: Getting Started

5 Tips for NaNoWriMo: Getting Started | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
5 Tips for NaNoWriMo: Getting Started (My guest post for @NaNoWriMo: 5 tips for getting started writing a novel http://t.co/5CUwSnIk9a #NaNoWriMo #NaNoPrep)...
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Conflict—Giving LIFE to Your Fiction

Conflict—Giving LIFE to Your Fiction | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Bad decisions make GREAT fiction. I know it’s tough to not write about fully evolved/self-actualized characters, but those guys are B-O-R-I-N-G. We like to watch people grow, probably so we might glean some hint of how to grow, ourselves.
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8 tips on writing

8 tips on writing | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
A Filipino blogger, Jerome, collected a series of my comments on writing On Confidence: You cannot sell your next book by underrating your book that was just published. Be proud of what you have.
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The Writers Alley: Favorite writing quotes

The Writers Alley: Favorite writing quotes | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Good writing is like a windowpane. ~ George Orwell   There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. ~ W. Somerset Maugham If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don't write, because our culture has no use for it. ~ Anais Nin    When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature. ~ Ernest Hemingway  Easy reading is hard writing. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne   To me, the greatest pleasure of writing is not what it's about, but the inner music that words make. ~ Truman Capote   The most important thing is to read as much as you can, like I did. It will give you an understanding of what makes good writing and it will enlarge your vocabulary. ~ J. K. Rowling  
Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:38 AM
Good writing is like a windowpane. ~ George Orwell   There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are. ~ W. Somerset Maugham If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don't write, because our culture has no use for it. ~ Anais Nin    When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature. ~ Ernest Hemingway  Easy reading is hard writing. ~ Nathaniel Hawthorne   To me, the greatest pleasure of writing is not what it's about, but the inner music that words make. ~ Truman Capote   The most important thing is to read as much as you can, like I did. It will give you an understanding of what makes good writing and it will enlarge your vocabulary. ~ J. K. Rowling  
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Dani Shapiro on the Pleasures and Perils of Writing & the Creative Life

Dani Shapiro on the Pleasures and Perils of Writing & the Creative Life | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
The writing life requires courage, patience, persistence, empathy, openness, and the ability to deal with rejection. It requires the willingness to be alone with oneself. To be gentle with oneself. To look at the world without blinders on. To observe and withstand what one sees. To be disciplined, and at the same time, take risks. To be willing to fail — not just once, but again and again, over the course of a lifetime.
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, October 22, 2013 9:06 PM

"What is it about writing that makes it—for some of us — as necessary as breathing? It is in the thousands of days of trying, failing, sitting, thinking, resisting, dreaming, raveling, unraveling that we are at our most engaged, alert, and alive. Time slips away. The body becomes irrelevant. We are as close to consciousness itself as we will ever be. This begins in the darkness. Beneath the frozen ground, buried deep below anything we can see, something may be taking root. Stay there, if you can. Don’t resist. Don’t force it, but don’t run away. Endure. Be patient. The rewards cannot be measured. Not now. But whatever happens, any writer will tell you: This is the best part."

Plenty of wisdom here, distilled from Dan Shapiro's book.

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15 writing tips from a journalist turned PR pro

15 writing tips from a journalist turned PR pro | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Think back to a time you stared at a blank screen, not sure how to start writing that memo, press release, report, or presentation. Stark and harsh, emptiness intimidates.
It can, anyway, unless you know exactly what you want to say.

Via Thomas Faltin
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K.I.S.S. – 10 tips on how to make your writing simply successful

K.I.S.S. – 10 tips on how to make your writing simply successful | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Blog post at How To Write Better : For some reason there has been a lot of chat recently online about how to write concisely. “Cut The Crap And Keep It Simple, Stupid” scr[..] (K.I.S.S.
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How to Use Evernote for NaNoWriMo, An Evernote Employee Shares His Tips

How to Use Evernote for NaNoWriMo, An Evernote Employee Shares His Tips | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Name: Mel Walker Profession: Software Engineer at Evernote Hobby: Writing Location: Pleasanton, CA Bio Mel Walker is a software engineer on the Evernote Mac team.
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Ramblings of a Frustrated Crime Writer: Tips for writing a successful novella

Ramblings of a Frustrated Crime Writer: Tips for writing a successful novella | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
RT @jenthom72: Tips to writing a successful novella http://t.co/Dlnh0CeYMV
#amwriting #writingtips #helltopay
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Fueling the Muse Part 2—How to Give Your NaNo Story a Beating Heart and a Skeleton

Fueling the Muse Part 2—How to Give Your NaNo Story a Beating Heart and a Skeleton | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Image via Flikr Creative Commons. Bansky’s “Peaceful Hearts Doctor” courtesy of Eva Blue.
All right. We’re discussing ways to fuel the muse before NaNo.
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Preparing for NaNoWriMo & Feeding the Muse to Go the Distance

Preparing for NaNoWriMo & Feeding the Muse to Go the Distance | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Image via Flikr Creative Commons, courtesy of Yosi Lazarof
All right, new flash. Writers are different *head twitches*. This might not be news to any of you, but I imagine some of you are in denial. I know I was for ages.
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A Few Amazing Writing Tips From Chuck Palahniuk - Ned Hardy

A Few Amazing Writing Tips From Chuck Palahniuk - Ned Hardy | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
“In six seconds, you’ll hate me. But in six months, you’ll be a better writer. From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs.
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Happen vs. Occur

Happen vs. Occur | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Anyone who watches U.S. television has seen the pharmaceutical ads that feature deliriously happy healthy-looking people frolicking with pets and loved ones as a Voice Over enumerates the serious side effects that can “happen” if they ingest the...
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1,667 words a day? Novel Writing Month issues the challenge

1,667 words a day? Novel Writing Month issues the challenge | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Warm up your laptops, and sharpen your pencils. The next Great American Novel could be brewing in El Paso in November thanks to a kick in the pants for writers called National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:59 PM

Warm up your laptops, and sharpen your pencils. The next Great American Novel could be brewing in El Paso in November thanks to a kick in the pants for writers called National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).

What started as a literary challenge in July 1999 with 21 people in the San Francisco Bay Area has grown into a huge online cult phenomenon involving more than 500,000 people across the country this year – including 500 hearty and hopeful El Pasoans.

“I write for fun, for the love of the month,” says Sara Polk, 25, an Illinois native pursuing a master’s in social work at UTEP. A four-time participant, she’s this year’s regional “municipal liaison.” She will coordinate area events and help motivate local writers, even as she writes her own NaNoWriMo novel.

The NaNoWriMo premise is that if you give a motivated writer a goal (write 50,000 words in 30 days) and a nurturing support structure (an industrial-strength website with serious writing tools, plus a friendly local network of fellow writers), that person can write a novel. That breaks down to an average of 1,667 words a day. It’s okay if it’s a stream-of-consciousness rough 

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Writing Craft: Creating Dynamic Characters

Writing Craft: Creating Dynamic Characters | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
I am a late bloomer. I don’t mean that literally, of course. In regards to my writing, I have learned more in these past three years than I ever knew in the total years I’ve been writing.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 23, 2013 5:58 PM

Dynamic characters are so important. Sure, my stories were fun for just me but they lacked not only originality but also a character that anyone who wasn’t me could find relatable. My main character existed because the story did and, to me, a story needs to exist because a character does. A story, whether it be 3,000 words or seven books and eight movies, is only as good as its characters are. Imagine Harry Potter without Harry Potter, for example. Imagine reading the scene in the third book where Harry is talking to Sirius Black outside of the Whomping Willow. Without knowing where Harry had come from, where Sirius had come from and how their stories coincided, would it have reduced you to tears the same way? What if you stuck Bruce Wayne without his backstory into the batsuit? Would Batman still exist? Technically, yes, but not in the same way. His motivations and convictions would be vastly different and the story as we know it would be gone. Those stories don’t exist without their characters and that’s because those stories are merely one snapshot of time in their characters’ lives while the characters continue to live before and after the pages are read.

 
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Angela Booth's Writing Blog: Top Ten Writing Tips To Help You To Write More

Angela Booth's Writing Blog: Top Ten Writing Tips To Help You To Write More | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Here in no particular order, are the ten best writing tips I've discovered in 25 years of writing. They may work for you, too. Try them. Tip One: Pay attention to images Your right brain thinks in images, and when...

Via S. Dionne Moore
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The Heart of Great Stories—How to Create Clear, Interesting Character OBJECTIVES

The Heart of Great Stories—How to Create Clear, Interesting Character OBJECTIVES | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Image from the 2013 movie “Haunter” Friday, we talked about how to create protagonists readers will love. James Scott Bell in his book Plot & Structure  introduces what he calls the LOCK system (which he has generously given me permission to...
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You’re Still Writing It, And It’s Wrong!

You’re Still Writing It, And It’s Wrong! | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it

Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 21, 2013 10:27 PM

Some of the things I see on TV cop shows really grind my gears. And, unfortunately, some of those things are actually finding their way into books—a double gear-grinder. Hmm…I wonder how that could happen?

Could it be that some writers are still using cop-television as a research tool, no matter how many times I and others in the real cop business jump up and down while screaming, snorting, squalling, huffing and puffing, and squealing? Could it be that writers actually believe what they see on shows such as Sleepy Hollow, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, The Blacklist (actually, I like this show, but it’s still far from realistic), Ironside (this one lasted all of two episodes before the network flushed it), and the woefully ridiculous Under The Dome?

Could it be that writers believe THEM over what they see here on The Graveyard Shift and what they’ve learned at the Writers’ Police Academy? Please, say it ain’t so!

Of course, it’s perfectly fine and dandy to stretch the truth and even make up stuff when writing fiction, but the make-believe absolutely must be believable, and not just when writing fictional cop stuff. Other things in stories must also be believable—not necessarily true, but believable. Or, as I like to say, believable make-believe.

After all, shows like Star Trek and Grimm are total fiction, but viewers can easily be drawn into the action because what they see the actors doing on screen “seems” realistic. It’s believable make-believe.

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Lynnette's Book World: YA Author Brenda Kearns Answers the Question "What’s the secret to writing a stupidly funny novel for teens?"

Lynnette's Book World: YA Author Brenda Kearns Answers the Question "What’s the secret to writing a stupidly funny novel for teens?" | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Tips for writing funny YA http://t.co/Rz3awtXrpr
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Sixty second writing tips: pushing the NaNo edges

Sixty second writing tips: pushing the NaNo edges | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
One of the main tenets of National November Writing Month - NaNoWriMo - is that it’s words-to-target. It’s there to push writers into producing. Even the organisers admit, what follows won’t necess...
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Creating a Protagonist Readers Will LOVE

Creating a Protagonist Readers Will LOVE | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Bridgette Jones Diary
I assume that most of you reading this aspire to be great novelists, even those who are preparing to take the NaNoWriMo Challenge in November. Novels are only one form of writing and, truth be told, they aren’t for everyone.
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Nora Ephron on writing: 7 tips

Nora Ephron on writing: 7 tips | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Before she wrote Silkwood, before she fictionalized her divorce from Carl Bernstein in the novel Heartburn, before she felt bad about her neck or put Sally with (One of my favourite writers known RT @goody2prod Nora Ephron on writing: 7 tips
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Fueling the Muse for NaNoWriMo—Part One

Fueling the Muse for NaNoWriMo—Part One | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
Yesterday, we talked about fueling the muse to go the distance. For the professional writer, every month is NaNoWriMo, so there is NO BETTER indoctrination into this business.
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