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How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly

How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
If we sift foreshadowing down to its simplest form, we could say it prepares readers for what will happen later in the story.

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Penelope's curator insight, January 14, 2014 12:35 AM

 

We hear lots about point of view, plot and climax, but what about foreshadowing? This very important element of a story seems to have been relegated to a back room and stuffed in the closet.

 

In its simplest form? It prepares readers for what will happen in the story. I'm sure you've read books where at the point of a major plot twist, you shake your head and say, huh? We all have. You feel cheated and want to snap that book shut!

 

There are two parts:

 

Part 1: The Plant    (Blantant or Subtle Hints)

Part 2: The Payoff (Important Scenes Play Out)

 

Foreshadowing can ease readers into what is going to happen. Sneak it in like pureed veggies, but don't hit readers over the head with it. This way, when you execute your plot twist, your readers will be delighted--not disgusted.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/04/how-to-use-foreshadowing.html

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How to Create a Character | Holly Lisle: Official Author Homepage

How to Create a Character | Holly Lisle: Official Author Homepage | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it

Holly Lisle: Official Author Homepage - "read with hunger, write with joy, live with passion."


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Penelope's curator insight, April 25, 2013 1:45 PM

 

Creating characters is something that writers struggle with from time to time. How soon to give out the name? The distinguishing characteristics? The personal tics? If you are short on ideas for your characters, this article by Holly should give you some great tips for well-rounded characters. She suggests:

 

o Don't start your character off with a name or a physical description

o Do start developing your character by giving him (or her) a problem, a dramatic need, a compulsion

o Don't rely on crutches

o Do empathize with your character

o Don't sympathize with your character

o Do write from your own life

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://hollylisle.com/how-to-create-a-character/

 

 

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10 Reasons You Should Do NaNoWriMo - Writing Rightly

10 Reasons You Should Do NaNoWriMo - Writing Rightly | Literary Productivity | Scoop.it
10 Reasons You Should Do NaNoWriMo

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Penelope's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:46 AM

 

In honor of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), I'm posting this informative (and amusing) article from the NaNoWriMo blog.

 

I have been signed up with NaNoWriMo for the past four years, but have not gone through process. For someone who needs a kick in the pants, this might be your gig.

 

Some of the 10 reasons you should frantically push through November and get a 50,000 word novel written?

 

o You love to write - what better reason!

o You have  story just burning to be told

o You want to escape chilly winters of the Northern Hemisphere

o You want to escape sunburns of the Southern Hemisphere

 

Read the post for the other six tips, and get started on your novel--today! You now have 24 days left to finish. Ready, set, go!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://blog.nanowrimo.org/post/32671611607/10-reasons-you-should-do-nanowrimo

 

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:13 PM

Come on, you know you want to write.