Literacy Using Web 2.0
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Literacy Using Web 2.0
Literacy in education for learning
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Excellent Video Tutorials for Teachers and Students to Learn about Copyright and Common Sense

Excellent Video Tutorials for Teachers and Students to Learn about Copyright and Common Sense | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
A couple of weeks ago Educational Technology and Mobile Learning started posting a series of posts featuring video tutorials on key topics in education including digital citizenship, BYOD (...
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Citing an Image is Not Enough!

Citing an Image is Not Enough! | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
I am thrilled to see so many students creating blog posts and going BEYOND “writing” text made up letters, words, sentences and paragraphs. Being able to “read” and “write” in other media is part of becoming fluent in media literacy.
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Effective Apps And Web Tools For BYOD Classrooms

Effective Apps And Web Tools For BYOD Classrooms | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
I'd recommend using this chart as a jumping off point to new adventures in learning in BYOD classrooms and beyond!
The post Effective Apps And Web Tools For BYOD Classrooms appeared first on Edudemic.
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How to Create a Linked Series of YouTube Videos

How to Create a Linked Series of YouTube Videos | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
In my previous post about PBS Math Club I mentioned that you could create similar videos by using the annotations tool in the YouTube video editor. If you would like to try this yourself, I have directions that will walk you through the process.
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14 Web Tools Teachers Should Try This School Year

14 Web Tools Teachers Should Try This School Year | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Sometimes when I look at all the articles and reviews of educational tools I have been posting here for the last three years I really get amazed at the volume of such work. More than 3000 posts and...
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Supporting Copyright Reform - Creative Commons

Supporting Copyright Reform - Creative Commons | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators.

Today Creative Commons released a policy statement expressing its support for copyright reform efforts around the world.
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MentorMob: What’s On Your Playlist? - Getting Smart by Alison Anderson - digital playlists, edchat, EdTech

MentorMob: What’s On Your Playlist? - Getting Smart by Alison Anderson - digital playlists, edchat, EdTech | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
A few months ago, I discovered MentorMob (MM), which allows any user to create “learning playlists” to share or open up to other fellow learners who might want to add or edit the content in the playlist.
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MentorMob Update for Connected Educators - Getting Smart by Alison Anderson

MentorMob Update for Connected Educators - Getting Smart by Alison Anderson | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
As many teachers look to “flip” their classes and seek an intuitive tool to create their own customized playlists for their students, MentorMob is a natural fit.

Via Susan Oxnevad
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Your Students Can Easily Create Infographics

Your Students Can Easily Create Infographics | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
The how and why of getting your students to create infographics. (Your Students Can Easily Create Infographics... http://t.co/1BllqrIpo6)
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Google Hangouts Guide for Teachers

Google Hangouts Guide for Teachers | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Google Plus is gaining such a huge momentum within educational circles. More and more teachers and educators are flocking to it and this is probably just the beginning. I have been using this...
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Explore 5,400 New Artifacts In the Google Cultural Institute

Explore 5,400 New Artifacts In the Google Cultural Institute | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
The Google Cultural Institute is one of my favorite sites for students in history, geography, and art courses.
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Five Research-Driven Education Trends At Work in Classrooms

Five Research-Driven Education Trends At Work in Classrooms | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Getty

Increasingly, educators are looking to research about how kids learn to influence teaching practices and tools.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:41 AM

Increasingly, educators are looking to research about how kids learnto influence teaching practices and tools. What seemed like on-the-fringe experiments, like game-based learning, have turned into real trends, and have gradually made their way into many (though certainly not most) classrooms.

BRAIN-BASED TEACHING

Many educators are using researchers’ insights into how children best learn to inform their teaching practices. Stanford professor Carol Dweck’s research on encouraging children to develop a growth-mindset continues to grow in popularity, as educators try to praise effort, not outcomes. Dweck writes that if children believe their abilities are fixed — that either that they’re smart or they’re not — they approach the world in different ways and aren’t as able to face adversity. When they believe skills and abilities can grow throughout one’s lifetime, they’re better able to rise to challenges.

Brainology, Dweck’s program, is just one of many such school-based programs that teachers can use in classrooms, as is Brainworks.

Educators are also teaching learning strategies, helping students find out the best ways to not just learn content, but how to learn. Ideas like remembering facts when they are set to music. This practice has been employed since the days of oral storytelling, but teachers are reviving it to help students in modern classrooms. Recent studies show that adults learn new languages more easily when they are set to a beat. Some educators are even experimenting with breaking up classical literature into bite sized raps.

There are plenty more examples of brain-based research on learning making its way into classroom practices.

GAME-BASED LEARNING

Games have long been used to engage students. But as game-based learning becomes more prevalent in schools, researchers are interested in how game structure mirrors the learning process. In many games, students explore ideas and try out solutions. When they learn the skills required at one level, they move up. Failure to complete tasks is reframed as part of the path towards learning how to conquer a level.

Universities like Harvard, MIT and the University of Wisconsin’s Game and Learning Society are studying how game-playing helps student engagement and achievement, and well-known researchers in the field like James Paul Gee and University of Wisconsin professor Kurt Squire show are using their own studies to show that games help students learn.

Once the terrain of experimental classrooms, digital games are now becoming more common in classrooms. In a recent survey by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center, half of 505 K-8 teachers said they use digital games with their students two or more days a week, and 18 percent use them daily. Educators are using commercial games like Minecraft, World of Warcraft and SimCity for education. The Institute of Play continues to study game-based learning and helps support two Quest to Learn schools, which are based around the idea of games and learning.

POWER OF PERSEVERANCE

Paul Tough’s book, How Children Succeed, popularized the ideas of grit and perseverance. Now those ideas have made their way into a U.S. Department of Education’s Technology office report as well as the Common Core State Standards, which many states are already implementing. The idea that failure is an opportunity to learn and improve, not a roadblock to achievement, is often referenced as one of the most important life skills a student can take with him beyond the classroom.

Angela Duckworth’s research on grit has shown that often students, who scored lower on intelligence tests, end up doing better in class. They were compensating for their lack of innate intelligence with hard work and that paid off in their GPAs. Duckworth has even developed a “Grit Scale” that allows students to self-report their “grittiness.”

QUESTIONING HOMEWORK

The growing movement against homework in the U.S. challenges the notion that the amount of homework a student is asked to do at home is an indication of rigor, and homework opponents argue that the increasing amount of “busy work” is unnecessarily taking up students’ out-of-school-time. They argue that downtime, free play, and family time are just as important to a child’s social and emotional development as what happens in school.

Some research has shown that too much homework has “little to no impact” on student test scores. Other research on how brains work challenges the common method of asking students to practice one discreet skill at home. Overall, there’s a push to reevaluate the kinds of work students are being asked to do at home and to ask whether it adds value to their learning. If the work is repetitive or tangential, it may add no real value, and teachers across the country are starting to institute no-homework policies. Even principals are starting to revolt and schools are instituting “no homework” nights or substituting “goals” for homework.

CULTIVATING CREATIVITY

Increasingly business leaders and educators are realizing that creativity is a uniquely human quality that will set future graduates apart from the ever smarter computers that are playing increasingly important roles in society. There’s been a focus on stimulating curiosity and creativity through Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) courses, including computer coding, as well as integrating art and design into courses. The design thinking movement is a good example of schools working to develop students’ ability to think for themselves, brainstorm ideas and execute them.

Many schools are also shifting towards project-based learning to help leverage student interests and passions in their school work. Long-form projects often allow students to demonstrate their creativity more than assignments that every student must complete the same way. The trend towards project-based learning is one indication that schools are actively looking to build creativity into curricula.

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Global Stories through Book Trailers

Global Stories through Book Trailers | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Book Trailers tempt viewers to read the book that is featured in the digital movie. Creating book trailers with students from other countries and cultures can provide a fascinating insight in to th...
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Five-Minute Film Festival: Copyright and Fair Use for Educators

Five-Minute Film Festival: Copyright and Fair Use for Educators | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
In K-12 education, it's a challenge to navigate the copyright and fair use waters. What can educators use? How can they use it? VideoAmy has collected some fun, engaging videos to help teachers and students understand the confusing subject.
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Student Guide to Social Media

Student Guide to Social Media | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
The Student Guide to Social Media has been produced jointly by the Universities of Leeds, York and Manchester. It can be explored via the type of social media, or the purpose for which you are using it (academic as well as recreational).
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The Differences Between Digital Natives And Digital Immigrants

The Differences Between Digital Natives And Digital Immigrants | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Basically, all of our young digital natives are being taught by "digital immigrants", or, folks who didn't grow up with the internet.
The post The Differences Between Digital Natives And Digital Immigrants appeared first on Edudemic.
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E-Portfolios and Open Badges

E-Portfolios and Open Badges | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
by Virtual College
The Virtual College team keep a close eye on the latest trends in e-learning, so we can advise our clients on any interesting developments. One trend we have been examining recently is ‘Open Badges’.
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Evaluating Historical "Facts"

Evaluating Historical "Facts" | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Evaluative questions that encourage the development of evidence based opinions help students learn to view history "as a complex narrative." (How the evaluative process encourages critical thinking (via @NCSS & @middleweb)
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This Week In Web 2.0

This Week In Web 2.0 | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
In yet another attempt to get at the enormous backlog I have of sites worth sharing, I’ve recently begin a regular feature called “The Week In Web 2.0.” It’ll be a short compilation of new decent sites that are worth noting, but maybe not...
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iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » 6 Days and 78 Resources for Digital Literacy Internet Safety

iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » 6 Days and 78 Resources for Digital Literacy Internet Safety | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it

At Anastasis Academy we are a 1:1 BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) school with EVERY student using technology throughout the day every day.  Internet Safety and Digital Citizenship are important topics for us because it is so integral to what our kids do while they are at school.  Whether or not you have a 1:1 program, these are topics that shouldn’t be overlooked!  Don’t assume that because your students are fairly savvy when it comes to learning technology, that they will automatically pick up on digital literacy.  Digital Literacy isn’t a topic that should be relegated to school either, it is essential that parents learn about digital literacy so that they can echo and enforce good technology use at home.  This week we will have a week of intensive digital literacy training for our students.  Being a BYOD school means that these topics come up as we go through the year often, it is nice for us to have an intensive week to refer students back to throughout the school year.  So much of digital literacy echoes good safety practices in “real” life.  As such, we spend time discussing online and offline safety practices during this week and have our local school deputy join us.  When I was a technology teacher, I would end this week with an Internet Driver’s License, students had to pass a safety quiz in order to get their license.  This was their ticket to being able to be online in my class.  Students could lose their license for inappropriate online behavior.  This was always popular for kindergarten through fifth grade students!  Below are our favorite resources to use.  We choose a different digital literacy topic for each day of the week, follow along or mix it up to meet your own needs!

 

http://ilearntechnology.com/?p=5127&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ilearntechnology%2FRKXM+%28iLearn+Technology%29


Via Cyndi Danner-Kuhn, Naomi Harm
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Digital Citizenship Week: 6 Resources for Educators

Digital Citizenship Week: 6 Resources for Educators | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Digital Citizenship Week is Oct. 21-25, and it's the perfect time for students and teachers to talk about online responsibility and safety. Blogger Matt Davis has collected some of the best resources to bring digital citizenship into the classroom.
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10 Good Search Engines for Teachers and Students

10 Good Search Engines for Teachers and Students | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
Google search engine is definitely one of the most popular search engines out there and most of our students use it as their first choice. However, there are also some other alternatives worth trying...
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Do Your Students Know How To Search?

Do Your Students Know How To Search? | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
There is a new digital divide on the horizon. It is not based around who has devices and who does not, but instead the new digital divide will be based around students who know how to effectively find and curate information and those who do not.
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As We May Type - MIT Technology Review

As We May Type - MIT Technology Review | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
As We May Type
MIT Technology Review
A new crop of startups is gearing up to change the way we write, taking on traditional authoring tools such as Microsoft Word, Google Docs, and WordPress.
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Augmented Calendars - Engage Their Minds

Augmented Calendars - Engage Their Minds | Literacy Using Web 2.0 | Scoop.it
I made a “Mystery Calendar” for October.  I found a list of historical people and events from October here, and chose 4 of them.  Then, I used iMovie to create short videos that gave clues about each one.  Because I have a Mac at home, I had a bit of trouble finding a good calendar template for the iWorks suite, but I finally landed on a good template for Numbers here.

Via John Evans
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:20 AM

I Love this idea, will I ever have time to try it out, who knows!? 

Terrie Pressman's curator insight, October 13, 2013 11:43 AM

Great idea to engage learners