THREE-DIMENSIONAL SPACE - STAGE 1
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THREE-DIMENSIONAL SPACE - STAGE 1
This Scoop-it topic is aligned to the following Mathematics Stage 1 outcome: MA1-14MG: Sorts, describes, represents and recognises three-dimensional objects, including cones, cubes, cylinders, spheres and prisms.
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Marshmallow Geometry - YouTube

This video informs children how to create geometric shapes (demonstrating with a cube) with marshmallows and toothpicks. It works well for a fun, hands-on activity for the classroom!

talia.hynek's insight:

This video could be used to explain and demonstrate to students the activity that they will be undertaking.  The video contains a birds-eye view of a child making a cube out of marshmallows and toothpicks. The students could carry out this activity after learning about three-dimensional shapes as a fun wrap-up activity or carried out when the class has a spare 15minutes or so to follow-up on students learning of 3D shapes from earlier in the week.

 

It is always important to consider the purpose and value of using technology in the classroom, and whether or not what the technology is providing can be provided by the teacher (in which case the teacher should be performing it as opposed to the technology). In this case of this video, it’s demonstration/modelling of the activity is more beneficial then the teacher or student modelling an example, as all students would be able to see due to the camera angle (birds-eye view) in which it is looking down on the child’s demonstration. This video does not dismiss the teacher’s input in this activity, as necessary instruction alongside the video would need to be given, as well as student clarification involving students being called up to possibly demonstrate the example given by the child in the video.

 

*n.b. inform students: precaution should be taken with toothpicks

n.b. smaller marshmallows work better as opposed to the big ones shown in the video. 

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Geometric Solids

Geometric Solids | THREE-DIMENSIONAL SPACE - STAGE 1 | Scoop.it

This tool allows you to manipulate various geometric solids and investigate their properties.

talia.hynek's insight:

This is a good resource to use to explain to student the properties of 3D shapes. It is particularly useful, as opposed to using a tangible 3D shape (although work with manipulatives should also be carried out), as it is hard to count and keep track of the faces, edges and vertices when ones hands are covering the object. This interactive tool allows all students to see the shape from various angles, as well as highlight the edges, faces and vertices, counting them as you highlight each. 

Limitations of this tool:

The tool only provides the cube as suitable for a stage 1 class. Demonstration with other 3D shapes will need to be carried out in addition to this. This tool would also be ineffective without giving students the opportunity to work with manipulatives, as they are proven to enhance mathematical understanding. ((Bobis, Mulligan & Lowrie, 2009, p.5)

 

References:

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2009). (3rd Edition). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically. Sydney: Pearson Education.

 

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Three-Dimensional solids Earth exploration

Three-Dimensional solids Earth exploration | THREE-DIMENSIONAL SPACE - STAGE 1 | Scoop.it

 Great interactive game suitable for recapping children's knowledge on three-dimensional shapes in the everyday environment. 

talia.hynek's insight:

This is a great interactive game to play as a whole class (stage 1) to recap with students on their knowledge of three-dimensional shapes, as well as to teach them how 3D shapes exist in their everyday environment. Students could be seated on floor, with the following link (above) displayed on the Interactive Whiteboard. The students could be invited one by one to come up and locate the 3D objects in illustrations within different locations (e.g. ‘Find two cylinders’).

 

Students would be answering the problems individually (each having a turn to interact with the board) which would allow the teacher to identify the students understanding and knowledge of 3D shapes, and work out where the class's weakness and strengths were with regards to particular shapes e.g. prisms, pyramids, spheres etc. Despite the individual answering of the questions, the class would be working together to progress to the next location/scene.

 

Collaborative learning and collective class challenges (goals) through interactive games on the interactive whiteboard such as this one,  are proven to assist in raising the level of engagement of students, motivating students, and promoting enthusiasm for learning (Smart Technologies, 2006, p.4). 

 

For further benefits of interactive games in Mathematics, see: 

 

Way, J. (1999). Learning Mathematics Through Games Series: 1. Why Games?. Retrieved 22 May 2014, from http://nrich.maths.org/2489

 

References:

SMART Technologies (2006). Interactive Whiteboards and Learning: Improving student learning outcomes and streamlining lesson planning. Retrieved 23 April, 2014 from 

http://www.sharpsav.com/wpcontent/uploads/2013/08/Int_Whiteboard_Research_Whitepaper.pdf 

 

 

 

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