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PISA results don’t look good, but before we panic let’s look at what we can learn from the latest test

PISA results don’t look good, but before we panic let’s look at what we can learn from the latest test | Education | Scoop.it
Rather than leaping to conclusions about a failing education system, we need to look at what the data tells us about student performance at a state level to help us make more informed decisions.
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“Conclusions based on PISA results deserve further attention”

“Conclusions based on PISA results deserve further attention” | Education | Scoop.it
2 weeks from now all educationalists will know where to go to next for inspiration. But maybe we'll need to take a closer look to the PISA results - to be published on December 6 - before booking our plane tickets. Just some extra input to the discussions to come: The tests results of the…
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The whole is always more than the sum of the parts...
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ICT is failing in schools – here's why

ICT is failing in schools – here's why | Education | Scoop.it
Just 55% of year 6 students and 52% of year 10 students are meeting the expected grades for ICT. What's going wrong?
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New study discourages an educational revolution based on gaming, but does see possibilities

New study discourages an educational revolution based on gaming, but does see possibilities | Education | Scoop.it
Today Apple announced new possibilities in their mobile devices specifically aimed at education. Also today a new study by Mayer looks at another relation between technology and education: gaming and the results are mixed: don't expect a revolution, but the different studies surveyed do offer many promising possibilities. From the press release: Game advocates are calling for a sweeping…
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Let's hope sense and sensibility prevail! The possibilities in the article were strong theoretically and pedagogically, which is encouraging for long term relevance for teaching and learning.

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Interesting report on critiques on PISA and other international comparisons

Interesting report on critiques on PISA and other international comparisons | Education | Scoop.it
One of the most visited posts on this blog deals with the comparison of educational systems. One of the most often used ways to compare education in different countries and regions is looking at international programs such as PISA, PIRLS, TIMMS,... But there has also been critiques, even open letters. I found this report via @dylanwilliam and…
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In a world of constant comparisons... Australia is not a Luxembourg or Korea or Finland and ye we seek to emulate... a good reflection...read the report for more info

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Boost Critical Thinking: Let Students Use Google on Exams | Big Think

Boost Critical Thinking: Let Students Use Google on Exams | Big Think | Education | Scoop.it
A British academic's remarks that "it’s inevitable that students will be allowed to use the Internet in exams" sparks a debate over the purpose of testing and the encouragement of learning.
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Let's test what we really want to measure! 

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Relax, your kids will be fine

Relax, your kids will be fine | Education | Scoop.it
IN 1693 the philosopher John Locke warned that children should not be given too much “unwholesome fruit” to eat. Three centuries later, misguided ideas about...
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Take note: children adopted and raised by brainy parents ended up no brainier than those adopted by average parents... read on....

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Higher education is more than vocational training

Higher education is more than vocational training | Education | Scoop.it
Universities Australia recently announced a joint initiative with business groups to get graduates “work ready” through vocational workplace training. This is to be welcomed but it is also to be questioned…
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A lot of businesses would find it hard to agree with a fair degree of the sentiment of this article.  While higher education aims to prepare for working life in the long term, many organisations are concerned about the lack of alignment of university graduates and their courses to ensure job readiness.  How does it play out in your workplace?

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Why poor kids continue to do poorly in the education game

Why poor kids continue to do poorly in the education game | Education | Scoop.it
The Conversation is running a series, Class in Australia, to identify, illuminate and debate its many manifestations. Here, Stewart Riddle outlines the correlation between low socioeconomic backgrounds…
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It's all about class… let's stop pretending marketing education is anything else….you do not have much choice if you can't afford it!

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Bogans and hipsters: we're talking the living language of class

Bogans and hipsters: we're talking the living language of class | Education | Scoop.it
Egalitarianism is an article of faith in Australia. While the nation still faces issues of class, Australians tend to be uncomfortable about discussing these or acknowledging their extent. Interestingly…
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 The distinction of class and why we buy the 'egalitarian' myth in Australia… what purpose does it serve Australian identities? 

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Good, Bad and Ugly: Public perceptions of Australian universities

Good, Bad and Ugly: Public perceptions of Australian universities | Education | Scoop.it
Good: there is significant public support for universities. Recent research (here and here) in Australia tells us something about public perception of universities. It suggests that over 75 per cent of…
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Read this and then rank what you believe are the top five in Australia!

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Learning sight words in kindergarten and the early grades

Learning sight words in kindergarten and the early grades | Education | Scoop.it
If you have children in kindergarten or the early elementary school grades, odds are you are helping them learn sight words. Here are some tips to help, and an excellent demonstration video with te...

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Why Students Can’t Google Their Way to the Truth (Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew)

Why Students Can’t Google Their Way to the Truth (Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew) | Education | Scoop.it
Sam Wineburg is a professor in the Stanford University Graduate School of Education. Sarah McGrew is pursuing her doctorate in curriculum and teacher education at Stanford. This commentary  appeared in Education Week, November 1, 2016. Did Donald Trump support the Iraq War? Hillary Clinton says yes. He says no. Who's right? In search of answers,…
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Best Evidence in Brief: Is the pen mightier than the computer?

Best Evidence in Brief: Is the pen mightier than the computer? | Education | Scoop.it
There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and this study received an interesting title, is the pen mightier than the computer: The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) in the UK has published a report assessing the impact of Abracadabra (ABRA), a 20-week online literacy program, on literacy outcomes for Year 1 students (kindergarten in the U.S.). ABRA is…
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ICT is failing in schools. Here's why

ICT is failing in schools. Here's why | Education | Scoop.it
Just 55% of year 6 students and 52% of year 10 students are meeting the expected grades for ICT. What's going wrong?
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Who owns Dumbledore – JK Rowling or the Harry Potter fans?

Who owns Dumbledore – JK Rowling or the Harry Potter fans? | Education | Scoop.it
JK Rowling has come under fire for signing an open letter opposing a cultural boycott of Israel. The form of the complaints, and Rowling's response, tell us much about the author-fan relationship.
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Much to reflect about making meaning in texts and the power of 'Harry'.... a good stimulus for discussion... not just literary ones!

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Don't Crush Reading Motivation - Education Week

Teachers should embrace the idea of students choosing their own books, even if they are too hard, Barbara C. Wheatley says.
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Wheatley's advice is spot on...

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3 short documentaries on Dutch education

3 short documentaries on Dutch education | Education | Scoop.it
'Steve Jobs' Schools Add Innovation to Dutch Curricula  Top of the Charts: Universities in the Netherlands 'Black Schools' in the Netherlands - Reversing a Trend  
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It takes time to embed technologies authentically into the learning process.. but how long is too long?

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Study Finds That Kindergarten is Too Easy

Study Finds That Kindergarten is Too Easy | Education | Scoop.it
A study has found that kindergarten teachers spend most of their time on basic literacy and math but that children learn more when taught more advanced material.
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Education policy is failing to fix the biggest problem: inequality

Education policy is failing to fix the biggest problem: inequality | Education | Scoop.it
The Conversation is running a series, Class in Australia, to identify, illuminate and debate its many manifestations. Here, John Smyth identifies the failure of government policies to tackle the nation’s…
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There are highly visible aspects of inequality that funding will address…and there are the less visible…and no amount of money will change this until there are deep cultural shifts in our approach to redress growing inequality.   We must think long term to build  sustainable solutions.

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Nickelodeon Kids & Family GPS: Kids of Today and... | VIMN Insights

Nickelodeon Kids & Family GPS: Kids of Today and... | VIMN Insights | Education | Scoop.it
Nickelodeon Kids & Family GPS: Kids of Today and Tomorrow


A truly global exploration, Viacom International Media Networks’ “Kids of Today and Tomorrow” study is the network’s broadest and most detailed analysis to date of kids around the world. With research based on 6,200 kids ages 9-14 across 32 countries, this study focused in on “last wavers,” or the youngest Millennials, born between 2003 and 2008. The findings point to several key traits that shape these kids’ world views and make them distinct from older members of this generational cohort.


Key Findings


Kids of today and tomorrow are confident.


Today’s youngest Millennials are overwhelmingly happy and optimistic.



88% consider themselves very happy, with happiness levels in this age group increasing over last six years.


Spending time with family and friends is the top factor generating happiness in most countries. Young Millennials enjoy doing activities together as a family.


Humor is important to young Millennials, who use it strategically to navigate life: 64% agree “I use humor to help me get my way.”


Happiness outweighs stress by a factor of 3 to 1: while almost 9 in 10 young Millennials describe themselves as very happy, only 24% report high levels of stress, with stress levels falling since 2006.



Kids today are re-calibrating their sense of what it is to be stressed as well as happy: they have grown up in a world of constant change and global economic crisis – for them, this is the norm.



Even in Greece, where the economic crisis is particularly acute, stress levels are only 36%. The highest stress levels among 9-14s are actually in Singapore and China (41% and 39%) – caused almost certainly by the highly pressured education systems in those countries.


In general, the youngest Millennials are characterized by an optimism with which they approach challenges: 90% agree “I can accomplish anything if I work hard enough” and 89% agree “I always try to be positive.”



At the global level, these high levels of happiness, low stress and growing positivity are combining to form a “virtuous circle” of mutual support that helps kids create an overall sense of confidence.



Belief in themselves: 65% believe not only that they are smart but also that they are smarter than other people.


Belief in their future: Despite everything, a large majority (84%) believe they will earn more than their parents


Belief in their generation: This is the winning generation … the expression “#winning” suits them perfectly and is acknowledged by many more 9-14s than by older Millennials (77% vs. 66% of 15-30s)


Belief in their creativity: 89% believe their creativity will help them to keep on winning in a fast-paced world.



Kids of today and tomorrow are grounded.


Authenticity is a key value for kids today and they live with their feet firmly on the ground.



94% report wanting to be true to the close circle around them and 93% to be true to themselves. When it comes to the people who inspire them or the people they trust most, it’s all about close family and friends. They might feel inspired by celebrities and sports stars, but they know not to trust them.


49% of the youngest Millennials name a family member as their #1 best friend– rising as high as 90% in Morocco and 87% in Brazil.



Kids of today and tomorrow are simultaneously more and less sheltered.


The difference is very clearly defined: in the real world, they are much more sheltered than in the past, with parents restricting and controlling their interactions with everything. However, given advances in technology and access to a wide range of devices, there is often relatively little protection – kids have unprecedented exposure to global ideas and images.



43% own their own computer/laptop and 28% own a smartphone.


61% have a social media account (and 11 years is the average age for having a first account – despite being below the age threshold set by many social platforms’ Terms & Conditions).


9-14s have 39 online “friends” they have never met (up from five since 2006).



Kids of today and tomorrow are proud to be.


The youngest Millennials are increasingly expressing a sense of affinity with their country. Their sense of national pride is growing stronger and they are more likely than six years ago to believe it’s important to maintain their country’s traditions.



87% agree that they are “proud to be [their ethnicity]” up from 81% in 2006.


79% agree “it’s important to maintain my country’s traditions,” up from 60% in 2006.


At the same time, they are tolerant of other cultures: 74% think it’s great to have people from other countries living in the kid’s country.



Kids of today and tomorrow are more “we” than “me.”


The youngest Millennials extend their positive spirit to also include a commitment to community and the wider world around them.



88% believe it’s important to help people in the community, with 61% having taken part in an effort to raise money for charity in the past year.


94% believe it’s people’s responsibility to protect the environment.



Advances in digital media play a large part in broadening horizons and inspiring kids to use the power they have at their fingertips in a positive manner:



85% agree “my age group has the potential to change the world for the better.”


71% agree “having access to the internet changes the way I think about the world.”



However, they don’t see this as anything out of the ordinary or think of themselves as “techy”:



2 out of 3 kids think that being connected is as much a part of everyday life as eating and sleeping – it’s simply how life is today. As a consequence of being constantly connected in a fast-moving world, it is natural for them to constantly adapt and be open-minded. They are resilient and life-ready.



Implications:



To reach these confident kids, it is important to communicate with them with a tone of positivity, smart but not cynical humor; and a playful approach, in line with the fun and happiness they seek in life.


Kids respond best to authentic brand messages: they recognize when someone is trying to sell them, so be honest.


It’s important to be both globally and locally relevant.



Methodology:


This study is based on 6,200 interviews with the 9-14 age group (at the time of research, born 1998-2003, which we have defined as “last wavers” within the Millennial generation) across 32 countries (Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, US, Canada, France, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Greece, UK, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, Russia, Hungary, Poland, China, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, India, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria and South Africa).


Video is also available in the following languages (click to view):



Spanish (Latin America)


Spanish (Europe)


French


Portuguese
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Check this out… our Oz kids are represented in the statistics for this!

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4 Must-Read Books on Storytelling

4 Must-Read Books on Storytelling | Education | Scoop.it
Stories are the way in which we teach moral lessons, keep an audience engaged in what we're saying, and convince others to pursue a course of action.
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Ah yes…and always remember the importance and impact of the 'ending'….

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Are youse using English properly – or mangling your native tongue?

Are youse using English properly – or mangling your native tongue? | Education | Scoop.it
Languages evolve and transform. If that weren’t the case, the only word in the previous sentence that would be considered English is and (which in any case used to mean if). The English we speak would…
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How do 'youse' fair with this - the fluidity of language and the way we use it? 

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