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Informational Text for Elementary School Students

Informational Text for Elementary School Students | Literacy | Scoop.it

Judy Blume. Beverly Cleary. Roald Dahl. Francine Pascal. Ann Martin.

As a child,those five authors dominated my reading lists. I loved the imagery that Dahl used to create fantastical characters. Cleary and Blume both delighted me with their uncanny awareness of what I, as a child, thought and understood. Pascal enticed me into a world of tween drama. Ann Martin made me want to become a babysitter and go on adventures. What do all of these authors have in common? They primarily pen fiction. Their realistic and fantasy tales were enticing and I learned a lot!


Via Roz Linder
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100 Best Children's Chapter Books of All-Time

100 Best Children's Chapter Books of All-Time | Literacy | Scoop.it

Great classics and contemporary lit choices for upper elementary students! This brought back great memories, while offering a nice list to consider when stocking a classroom library.

 


Via Roz Linder
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Practicing Textual Evidence in the Elementary Classroom

Practicing Textual Evidence in the Elementary Classroom | Literacy | Scoop.it

Teaching students how to make inferences from textual evidence can be daunting, at first. As the first reading standard, it provides a critical foundation for the other standards. If students don’t get this concept under their belts, they will struggle as they move on to more multifaceted standards. I get a fair amount of emails from teachers looking for ideas to introduce and help students to understand the connection between implicit ideas in the text and supporting evidence.

Here’s a great way to practice Reading Standard 1 (Textual Evidence)with your students. One of the key things to remember about this standard is that you want your students to be able to cite evidence from their reading to support their analysis of what the text says. This requires that you teach your students how to make inferences to uncover the implicit messages in the text.

 


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40 Things to Do with a Text

40 Things to Do with a Text | Literacy | Scoop.it
This article was written by Dominic Braham and Anthony Gaughan and originally appeared in English Teaching Matters, the English Language Teachers' Associations journal. Before we get started… Wait ...

Via juandoming, Lynnette Van Dyke, Roz Linder
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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, September 16, 2013 9:53 PM

Great thinking skills that don't take much time, but help students learn about how many ways there are to look at text.

Francesc clavera i riera's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:58 AM

Interessant per al tractament de les llengües a l'aula....

 

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Watch: The Case for Common Core

Watch: The Case for Common Core | Literacy | Scoop.it
You don't need to know much about the school system to get why #CommonCore is critical for our kids' futures. Here's the short and sweet version.

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Teaching the Text Structure Standard (RI5) in the Elementary Classroom

Teaching the Text Structure Standard (RI5) in the Elementary Classroom | Literacy | Scoop.it
Students in third through fifth grade have probably spent several years learning about narrative structure. As they begin to learn more about informational text, they have to reframe how they think about text because informational text can be nonlinear. This means that it does not have to be read in the same way by everyone. Readers can “enter” the text in multiple ways. This is particularly true for digital text. Think about a website: one reader might navigate the content very differently than another reader. The entry points are different. This standard demands that students recognize the different entry points and what function they serve. These entry points are the text structures, and these structures can be physical or organizational. When teaching the Text Structure standard there are two different areas to consider: physical text features and organizational structures/features.

Each grade level focuses on a specific aspect of the standard. In third grade, for example, students are expected to understand the physical text features. These include hyperlinks, bullets, headings, sidebars, chart, graphs, etc. In fourth and fifth grade, the focus is no longer on physical text features; students are expected to look at the organizational structures of the text. In fifth grade, students continue to look at the organizational structures of the text, but expand to include multiple texts


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