LITB3 Elements of the Gothic
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BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Gothic

BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Gothic | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
Melvyn Bragg examines the origins and significance of the 18th century Gothic movement.

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BBC Four - Frankenstein: Birth of a Monster

BBC Four - Frankenstein: Birth of a Monster | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
The true story of Frankenstein's monster and the woman who created him, Mary Shelley.

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BBC Four - The Romantics, Nature

BBC Four - The Romantics, Nature | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
Man's escape from the shackles of industry and commerce to the freedom of nature.

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What did Roman Polanski do With Macbeth? - What's It All About ...

What did Roman Polanski do With Macbeth? - What's It All About ... | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
And while Macbeth is undeniably a dark play, the tone of Polanski's version is undoubtedly coloured by the death of his wife, Sharon Tate, and a group of friends, who were all murdered by members of the Manson Cult.

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Gothic Romanticism: architecture, politics and literary form | The Gothic Imagination

Gothic Romanticism: architecture, politics and literary form | The Gothic Imagination | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

Duggett argues that the split between ‘Romantic’ and ‘Gothic’ was not simply accidental or a later critical imposition on the period. He argues that the first generation of Romantic poets (specifically William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey) were actively instrumental in ‘the creation of a wider “Gothic culture” and “second Gothic poetry” that differentiated a ‘distinctive, purer Gothic’ literature over and above the Gothic novel for instance. Whereas Michael Gamer’s work, Romanticism and the Gothic (2000) shows the emergence of Romanticism out of the broader cultural umbrella of Gothic, Duggett argues that ‘the phenomenon known as Romanticism is a reform movement within [my emphasis] the Gothic —less a break-away reformation movement than a program for a counter-reformation.’ Gothic Romanticism looks at the discourses of architecture, politics and literary form in order to reappraise the works of these three key Romantic poets, especially Wordsworth.


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Lady Macbeth incites Macbeth to murder Duncan


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Macbeth - Themes

Part of the eNotes.com video studyguide for Macbeth by William Shakespeare. Overview of the major themes of Macbeth

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Generic Restrictions and the ‘Female Gothic’ | The Gothic Imagination

Generic Restrictions and the ‘Female Gothic’ | The Gothic Imagination | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

I’ve been thinking about genre lately – about the boundaries of the Gothic genre as a whole and about the ongoing currency of definitions of the ‘female Gothic’ in particular. I have never been particularly worried about whether any given text met enough Gothic criteria to ‘count’ as a Gothic novel, but the question of generic definitions is one I’m used to answering. And I have always hated the category of the ‘female Gothic’, for all the usual reasons about its tendency to encourage ahistorical gender essentialism. Overall, I have a strong sense that over-reliance on generic demarcations is confining, but I remain curious as to whether this is countered by the usefulness of such classification.


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Gothic embodiment: Lon Chaney and affective amputation | The Gothic Imagination

Gothic embodiment: Lon Chaney and affective amputation | The Gothic Imagination | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

What is a gothic body? Is there such as thing? Various scholars have theorised gothic embodiment and physical difference in gothic works, testifying to the specific corporeal side to the gothic.


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Monster vs Mariner: The Gothic Novel

Monster vs Mariner: The Gothic Novel | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
In 1765, when Horace Walpole wrote The Castle of Otranto during the Romantic period, the Gothic novel became acceptable writing material. Early depictions of the genre saw the use of stereotypical ...

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Macbeth - An Online Version of Shakespeare's Tragedy of Macbeth | transmedia et éducation | Scoop.it

Macbeth - An Online Version of Shakespeare's Tragedy of Macbeth | transmedia et éducation | Scoop.it | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
Macbeth - an online graphic novel of William Shakespeare's Macbeth. Ideal overview & summary of Shakespeare's play.

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Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein's creation

Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein's creation | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

We will each write a ghost story, said Lord Byron, and his proposition was acceded to.” So wrote Mary Shelley in the preface to her first novel, Frankenstein, published in 1831, 15 years after one of the most mythologised events in literary history. That was the famous night at the Villa Diodati, near Lake Geneva, in 1816, when Byron, Mary Godwin, Percy Shelley and John Polidori, Byron’s doctor, gathered by the fire to make up ghost stories. Two of the horror genre’s most enduring monsters were born: the vampire and Victor Frankenstein’s unnamed creation. But Mary also wrote herself into fiction by mythologising further a group of writers who have been the subject of both biography and fiction, ever since.


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Marina Warner discusses Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories (part 1 of 3)

Marina Warner introducer of The Folio Society's edition of The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories in conversation with Folio Society editor Johanna Geary www.f...

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BBC Radio 4 Extra - A Short History of Gothic

BBC Radio 4 Extra - A Short History of Gothic | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
Readings of classic gothic stories...

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How Mary Shelley's Mother Influenced Her Life and Writing

How Mary Shelley's Mother Influenced Her Life and Writing | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
The impact of Mary Wollstonecraft on her daughter Mary Shelley and the themes of 'Frankenstein'.

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The Literary Gothic | Mary Shelley

The Literary Gothic | Mary Shelley | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley page at The Literary Gothic, the web's premier guide to Gothic and supernaturalist literature written prior to 1950...

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Frankenstein (1910) - Full Movie

Frankenstein is a 1910 film made by Edison Studios that was written and directed by J. Searle Dawley. It was the first motion picture adaptation of Mary Shel...

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The Gruesome, True Inspiration Behind 'Frankenstein'

The Gruesome, True Inspiration Behind 'Frankenstein' | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

 Mary Godwin Shelley's fantastically mad and flawed character, Victor Frankenstein, bears a striking similarity to Giovanni Aldini: both are scientists bent down a path of forbidden knowledge; both have a streak of showmanship about them; both, they say, begin their ordeals with benign intentions only to be overcome by boastful pride. Both try to restore the dead. One difference separates the two men: in Mary Shelley's account, the dead return, and Victor Frankenstein fatally pays for his actions.


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Macbeth Act 2 Scene 1 Analysis

Part of a scene by scene analysis of Shakespeare's classic play Macbeth by Providence Academy's William Lasseter. You can download the complete version of "M...

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Thematic Imagery in "Macbeth" Quiz - Macbeth

Thematic Imagery in "Macbeth" Quiz - Macbeth | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it
If youve noticed how brilliantly thematic images are interwoven in Macbeth, then this quiz is for you. You really need to know your Macbeth to answer this selection. (Author fiachra)

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Gothic literature meets science

Gothic literature meets science | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

Poking around old manuscripts and researching dusty archives helped Natasha Rebry unravel the mysteries of the Victorian era. She sought new insights by blending her study of Gothic literature with the history of modern psychology for her PhD dissertation.


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marmoe's curator insight, November 17, 2015 6:59 AM

Viktoriansk kultur og gotisk litteratur sett i lyset av moderne psykologisk vitenskap.

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Theatre's women of substance - The Guardian

Theatre's women of substance - The Guardian | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

“The Guardian Theatre's women of substance The Guardian ... Guardian, Wednesday 13 November 2013. Jump to comments (…) Kate Fleetwood as Lady Macbeth at Chichester Festival theatre. ... her mad, she's gone too far.”


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Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” from a Jungian view

Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” from a Jungian view | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

This article explores the psychological underpinnings of  Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” from a Jungian view. Carl Jung left a great deal of ambiguity surrounding his work. He understood, as long as there have been men and they have lived, they have all felt this tragic ambiguity and everybody must accept his or her ”Shadow” during the individuation process. Ambiguity between good an evil, and a failed individuation is the core theme in the tragedy Macbeth: “Fair is foul, and foul is fair” say the three witches in the beginning of the play and this paradox is touched again by Macbeth: “So foul and fair a day I have not seen”.

 

 


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The Afterlife of Shelley and Frankenstein

The Afterlife of Shelley and Frankenstein | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

What makes a monster? What is it like living on the margins of society? Is technology inherently good or bad? These questions guided Mary Shelley 200 years ago as she wrote her classic novel Frankenstein — they remain just as relevant today. The second edition of Biblion explores the connections between Shelley’s time and our own, showing how the classics resonate throughout society and the breadth of NYPL’s offerings.


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The lady and her monsters: real-life Frankensteins and how Mary Shelley’s masterpiece came to life

The lady and her monsters: real-life Frankensteins and how Mary Shelley’s masterpiece came to life | LITB3 Elements of the Gothic | Scoop.it

The experiments and reanimations of Mary Shelley, Luigi Galvani, and Giovanni Aldini.

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samisego's comment, March 18, 2013 3:52 PM
Remember to hand in a summary of what events in the life of Mary Sheley led her to write her masterpiece Frankenstein. The dead line is next Monday (25/03/13)