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The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading

The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading | Lit. | Scoop.it
The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading

MindShift (blog)

 

Which is why we should care about the survival of a human treasure threatened right here at home: the deep reader. “Deep reading”—as opposed to the often superficial reading we do on the web—is an endangered practice, one we ought to take steps to preserve as we would a historic building or a significant work of art. Its disappearance would imperil the intellectual and emotional development of generations growing up online, as well as the perpetuation of a critical part of our culture: the novels, poems and other kinds of literature that can be appreciated only by readers whose brains, quite literally, have been trained to apprehend them.

 

Recent research in cognitive science, psychology and neuroscience has demonstrated that deep reading—slow, immersive, rich in sensory detail and emotional and moral complexity—is a distinctive experience, different in kind from the mere decoding of words.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
Allie Elise's insight:

great for PLC / explaining value of SSR

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Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, June 4, 2013 3:36 PM

A good companion piece for "Can Books Make Us Better People?"

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Novelist Patrick McGrath on Writing, Setting, and Psychology - Huffington Post

Novelist Patrick McGrath on Writing, Setting, and Psychology - Huffington Post | Lit. | Scoop.it
Novelist Patrick McGrath on Writing, Setting, and Psychology

Huffington Post

 

His latest novel focuses on Constance Schulyer, a chilly woman in 1960s New York who marries early, and is troubled often. Her new husband, Sidney Klein--a professor of romantic poetry--has great hopes for Constance and revels in the opportunity to "improve her," and his marital track record. But with a disclosure from her father that confirms Constance's deep, longstanding fears, the façade of careful grace built in opposition to her family begins to fracture, along with her delicate psyche.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
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Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, June 11, 2013 11:45 AM

Read how McGrath developed the story line for the novel.

Rescooped by Allie Elise from Soundtrack
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The Tragic Emptiness of 'The Great Gatsby' | The Atlantic Wire

The Tragic Emptiness of 'The Great Gatsby' | The Atlantic Wire | Lit. | Scoop.it
While certainly not a disaster, Baz Lurhrmann's opulent adaptation begins to look and feel like something grand and profound, before transforming into a decidedly unthoughtful stagger through familiar territory.

Via Christopher Coleman
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Christopher Coleman's curator insight, May 8, 2013 10:18 PM

Sounds like the HIGH POINT is Craig Armstrong's original score...


" But it's what composer Craig Armstrong does with those tunes, turning them into orchestral riffs that haunt and envelop, that's really striking. When that music swells and the green light burns, the picture feels truly 3D, immersive and captivating. But unfortunately those moments are increasingly few and fleeting. "

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The Literary Value of Psychoanalysis - Daily Beast

The Literary Value of Psychoanalysis - Daily Beast | Lit. | Scoop.it
Daily Beast
The Literary Value of Psychoanalysis

 

Psychoanalysis and storytelling have a rich history. “I begin the treatment, indeed, by asking the patient to give me the whole story of his life and illness,” Freud writes in his famous case study of “Dora” in 1905. It is a method reiterated by Grosz in his book, where he declares, “I believe that all of us try to make sense of our lives by telling our stories.” Back in 1962, in an introduction to the “Dora” case, Philip Reiff argued that the case study was a distinct literary genre, a line of argument that was then taken up by literary critics like Steven Marcus and Peter Brooks in the 1980s and ’90s. Marcus, for example, argued that Freud was an unwitting modernist master and “Dora” “a great work of literature.” Grosz mentions the “slight embarrassment” that clinicians feel about this emphasis on the rather unscientific element of psychoanalysis. Yet despite a lifetime of clinical work, he actually errs on the side of literature. “Anything that can be written up theoretically in a technical paper can be told better in a story,” he says. “It’s a better way of communicating.”


Via Mary Daniels Brown
Allie Elise's insight:

really cool

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Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, June 6, 2013 3:24 PM

About Stephen Grosz's book "The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves," now available in the U.S.

Rescooped by Allie Elise from Technology in the Classroom; 1:1 Laptops & iPads & MORE
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5 Tools Students Can Use to Create Alternative Book Reports

5 Tools Students Can Use to Create Alternative Book Reports | Lit. | Scoop.it

This afternoon someone emailed me asking for some suggestions for tools for creating book trailer videos. It has been two years since I last wrote about the topic so I created a new list of tools for creating book trailers. Book trailers are short videos designed to spark a viewer's interest in a book. Having students create book trailers is an excellent alternative to traditional book report projects. A great place to find examples of book trailers is Book Trailers for Readers.


Via Cyndi Danner-Kuhn
Allie Elise's insight:

awesome idea

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