Linux A Future
6.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Linux A Future
Linux The Rosetta Stone
Curated by Jan Bergmans
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Living in a Cloudy Post-PRISM World, Where Do We Go From Here?

Living in a Cloudy Post-PRISM World, Where Do We Go From Here? | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Now that we know our data is being watched, what are the next steps for the enterprise?
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Businesses need to face the problem of their data exposure head on. They can start by auditing the use of services like DropBox, Google Drive, Box or Accelion: vendors that force your data off site, either to store it or to “cloud enable” it. Even if data is stored on premises, if it has to travel to off-site servers, which should raise red flags. Once the audit is complete, decide if your company can risk the exposure of that data.

An organization has three choices:

Keep all your systems and data private under your own controlBuild trust (relationships, legal, general) into an organization to host your systems and dataBuild a hybrid strategy depending on the level of importance of systems and data or other decision criteria

However, any solution a business wants to implement should fulfill the following criteria:

Allows you or your employees (and customers and partners) to access data and files when they want and where they wantGives you full control and auditabilitySecurely allows the exchange of data across people and other organizationsAllows you or any third-party or interested person to control that there are no built-in backdoors (open source is a great way to accomplish this)

A good start is to just take a closer look at your data—where’s it going? Why? Who really controls it? 

Realizing you have a problem is the first step to taking back control.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

FLOSSK | Free Libre Open Source Software Kosova

FLOSSK | Free Libre Open Source Software Kosova | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:
Workshop: Visualizing open data to bring out global issuesSubmitted by altin on Wed, 07/10/2013 - 13:50

Starting in July 2013 and for one year, Alex and Margo will travel through South-East Europe, Turkey, India, South-East Asia, Japan and South-America. They are going to take advantage of this opportunity and meet people, collectives and organisations actively working on making information, knowledge and education available for everyone. We are honored to be one of the stops of the duo on Thursday July 25th @ ICK (Innovation Centre Kosovo) from 06:00pm for a dedicated workshop.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Fact sheet: Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) - TechRepublic

Fact sheet: Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) - TechRepublic | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Here is a quick fact sheet about what changes you can expect to see in Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander).
Jan Bergmans's insight:

October 2013 will see the release of the next iteration of the Ubuntu Linux operating system. There are plenty of features coming down the pipeline, some of which have caused great controversy with the Linux world. Even with the surrounding controversy, Ubuntu Linux continues to be one of the most popular Linux desktops available.

But what will the Saucy Salamander release offer the user that might help make them switch? Let's take a look and see.

What we know

Kernel: 3.11 RC5

Desktop interface: Unity 7. Unity Touch will be arriving in Ubuntu 14.04, but Ubuntu 13.10 will continue with the current implementation of Unity. There will be plenty of bug fixes and some new features added. The two biggest features for Unity 7 will include Smart Scopes (100 Scopes to empower searching through the Dash) and In-Dash Payments (which allow you to search for things like music and then pay for them directly from their In-Dash search results). Unity will also enjoy a few new indicators to make the experience even better.

Smart Scopes: As I already mentioned, Smart Scopes will finally ship. This has been a feature surrounded by controversy. When you open the Unity Dash and enter text, the Dash searches in various locations for results; the locations include your desktop, external drives, Amazon.com, and more. But with Smart Scopes, the results will come from 100 different locations. Of course, the user can define what locations to leave out from the results. Here are just a few Smart Scopes locations:

ApplicationsCalculatorChromium bookmarksCommandsDev HelpFacebookFiles and foldersGoogle DriveManpagesPicasaVideosAmazonVirtualBoxYelp

Compiz: A 'trunk' version of Compiz, called Compiz 0.9.10, will include a number of patches and performance tweaks that should make the desktop much faster and smoother.

Mir: Although the finished version of the full-blown Mir isn't planned until the next LTS release (14.04), there will be a version of Mir using XMir to run Unity 7. Mir will only be made available for cards that use the standard drivers. For cards that rely on proprietary drivers, the current X server will be used.

Locally Integrated Menus: These might ship in 13.10. Locally Integrated Menus are sort of a hybrid between the HUD and standard menus -- a drop-down menu that resides on the Panel (for maximized windows) and in the window decoration (for un-maximized windows). 

Video driver changes:

The following video driver changes may arrive in 13.10:

Nvidia Optimus supportNvidia Prime supportRadeon UVD supportRadeonSI supportProper touch screen support

Software:

Look for the following software changes with 13.10:

Although it was rumored the Chrome would become the default browser, Saucy Salamander will ship with Firefox as the defaultLibreOffice 4.1 will be the default office suiteRhythmbox will be the default music playerThunderbird will be the default email client

Another feature that may arrive in Saucy is “Click Packages.” This is primarily aimed at developers to make it easier for them to get their Ubuntu packages with no dependencies between applications, no maintainer scripts, and each app will be installed in its own directory. Click Packages is based on technology Debian has used for over 20 years, so it's proven.

Although there are a number of users up in arms about the change to Mir and the ever-present concerns about Smart Scopes and security (which is a non-issue, as each scope can be disabled), Ubuntu 13.10 looks to be a very solid interim release that will do a great deal to make way for the next major iteration of Ubuntu … 14.04. Though you may consider this a bridge between the old and the new Ubuntu, 13.10 should be worth trying.

About Jack Wallen

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for Techrepublic and Linux.com. As an avid promoter/user of the Linux OS, Jack tries to convert as many users to open source as possible. His current favorite flavor of Linux is Bodhi Linux (a melding of Ubuntu ...

Full BioContactSee all of Jack's content11 commentsSign in  + FollowPost comment    Newest | Oldestamp3030

 This article is full of mistakes. Don't trust it!

Linux kernel 3.8 is used in the current stable Ubuntu 13.04. The current stable kernel is 3.11. Why should 13.10 ship the old 3.8?
There is nothing called Unity Touch.
The current major Unity version is 7.
Ubuntu 14.04 LTS desktop will ship Unity 7.
Ubuntu 13.10 mobile will have Unity 8.
Unity 8 for the desktop (originally named Unity Next) will first ship in 14.10.

 adornoe

Where do people come up with these stupid and childish names for pieces of software, or any kind of product?  

How can anybody take them serious with such foolishness?  Linux needs more than silliness in order to attract users. 

 heldemanpieter

The easiest software installation are with Ubuntu 12.04 onwards. It is just a click and it install from the Ubuntu Software Center. Ubuntu installs easier than Window software and to install Windows 8 takes much longer than 15 minutes. I know I use Windows 8 and Ubuntu 13.04. Although "some" Linux software are not as good than software for Windows many are and free. According to many comparison tests Ubuntu are more stable than Windows.

 dhjohns

It sounds nice, but are programs easily installed in Linux yet, or do you still need a Doctorate in Programming to use Linux.  I have spent hours loading a Linux distribution only to have NO GUI, and all weekend getting a mouse to work.  Windows 8 installs in 15 minutes, and you are good-to-go!

 jlwallen

@amp3030 I also have to wonder if Ubuntu will drop the "touch" name all together, since VMWare has a tool now called Unity Touch.

 jlwallen

@amp3030 You are correct in the kernel. That was my error.  I was using an Alpha version of 13.10 to get some of my information and that alpha had (according to uname -r) 3.8. As for which version of Unity that will ship -- it will not be shipping with Unity 8 (called Next). You can, however, test Unity 8 in 13.10, but it will not be the default.  That is what I stated in the fact sheet. 

 jlwallen

@adornoe I don't know. Ask those that came up with the Google Play Store. ;-)

 jlwallen

@heldemanpieter and apparently the installation of applications will become even easier with 13.10. Though this wasn't available in the alpha I tested, I've been hearing good things to come for software installation in saucy.

 jlwallen

@dhjohns Any of the modern Linux distros are just as easy (if not easier) than a Windows installation. The best way to do this is to use a Live distribution, have it running, and then install it from the running desktop. 

 aenews

@dhjohns no not in ubuntu

booted off my flashdrive on my grandpa's comp and he still figured out he could open chrome by clicking it on the dash.  A few years ago, he thought that you could only go toa website by googling it first so...

As for programs, any program that you download that comes with a .deb will install not much unlike Windows/ Mac will... you know, double-clicking the file.  Anything found on the software center is very easy to install as well obviously.

Worst case scenario: You are looking for specific software and need to copy and paste a few lines into the terminal.  Generally not needed but easy to do. Robynsveil

@dhjohns Geez, which distro did you install? Did you not read the article? Doctorate in Programming... what? What are you on about?

 Conversation powered by LiveFyreAdd your CommentEditor's Picks

Tough questions to ask your cloud provider, part 1

Fact sheet: Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander)

How safe are online password managers?

10 ways to combine virtualization and co-location

 IT Buying CycleLearn more Discover Investigate Compare Justify OptimizeBangalore hosts the 2nd Annual Mobile Apps 2013 conference

Apps // August 26, 2013, 8:31 AM PST

Hand of Thief malware could be dangerous (if you install it)

Linux // August 16, 2013, 12:51 PM PST

Bug Bounty programs pay off for Google and Facebook, and IT pros

IT Employment // August 15, 2013, 5:02 AM PST

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jan Bergmans from txwikinger-open-source
Scoop.it!

Flowblade..A New Linux Video Editor..Nice.

Here we have a new kid on the block, called flowblade, a video editor for linux which has been out in this form for around just under a month and is availabl...

Via txwikinger
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

The wireless network with a mile-wide range that the “internet of things” could be built on

The wireless network with a mile-wide range that the “internet of things” could be built on | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Robotics engineer Taylor Alexander needed to lift a nuclear cooling tower off its foundation using 19 high-strength steel cables, and the Android app that was supposed to accomplish it, for which he'd just paid a developer $20,000, was essentially...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

OMG! Ubuntu! - Ubuntu News, Apps, Reviews and Features

OMG! Ubuntu! - Ubuntu News, Apps, Reviews and Features | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
OMG! Ubuntu! brings you the latest Ubuntu news, application reviews, handy how-to's and development previews daily.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

 

IdeaThis Mock Ubuntu Boot Experience Is Pretty SleekBy Joey-Elijah Sneddon2 hours ago Comment

Could Ubuntu’s boot experience look slicker? One YouTube thinks so, and has created a video demo of his dream boot sequence.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

The week in security: Linux Trojan bows as industrious cybercrims abound

The week in security: Linux Trojan bows as industrious cybercrims abound | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Concerned about your anonymity online? All you have to do is stop using Windows – and disable JavaScript – according to the authors of the TOR Project, whose protections are apparently undermined by a newfound Firefox vulnerability.
Jan Bergmans's insight:
David Braue (CSO Online (Australia))— 14 August, 2013 09:33

Concerned about your anonymity online? All you have to do is stop using Windows – and disable JavaScript – according to the authors of the TOR Project, whose protections are apparently undermined by a newfound Firefox vulnerability.

Also undermined were the Lavabit and Silent Circle anonymous email services, felled by legal battles (Lavabit was the service used by infamous NSA leaker Edward Snowden). Lavabit’s founder later The FBI has taken its own stab at anonymity with a new unstructured data analysis, as well as a need to face new realities as The US government is considering a range of options to incentivise better cybersecurity, with work commencing on a maximise its culture of openness as estimates suggest it could lose $35 billion in business revenue to overseas companies following exposure of its NSA surveillance programs.

One survey of malicious online activity found that phishing attacks are dropping as cybercriminals However, DDoS isn’t the only growth area in the cybercriminal arena: Malware-as-a-service offerings are, according to one study, toll fraud and malware ‘startups’ including a resourceful firm Russia isn’t the only country fostering a new breed of malware architects: Latvia’s foreign minister has complained about US attempts to extradite an alleged author of the Gozi data-stealing Trojan. Also on the international front, the Serious Fraud Office was in damage-control mode after faxing customers’ details to the wrong people.

Bank of Scotland may be giving away customers’ personal information, but Australian customers are the third most-susceptible in the world to doing the same on their own after a Trend Micro survey found near world-leading rates of banking malware infection. Blogs and other content-management sites were being Others were exploring the possibilities of a new scheme for boycotts of troll-hosting social networks as well as attracting derision from Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales about Cameron’s plans to Some were asking whether US and other governments’ bans on Lenovo equipment – found to have firmware backdoors – began rolling out its Android Device Manager. Google was, however, copping heat over the fact that the company’s Chrome Web browser can reveal saved passwords to anyone that uses your computer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

How to install Raspbian on Raspberry Pi from a USB stick

How to install Raspbian on Raspberry Pi from a USB stick | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Give yourself more control over how you install Raspbian to your Raspberry Pi by using an Ubuntu live CD.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

If you've never used Linux before, don't worry. These days, it's just as easy to use as any other operating system, and in many ways, it's easier. There are no drivers to chase and new applications are always installed through the Linux equivalent of an app store.

And, as you're going to be installing and using Linux on your Raspberry Pi, it makes good sense to create your SD card from within a Linux environment. It doesn't make the installation any better, but it gives you a great opportunity to try it out before plugging in your Raspberry Pi.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

The secure mail dilemma: If it's useable, it's probably insecure • The Register

The secure mail dilemma: If it's useable, it's probably insecure • The Register | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Analysis The sudden closure of two secure email services may cause many privacy-conscious people to begin looking for alternatives. However, security experts warn that any service provider may be put under pressure to comply with authorities, and this might kill off secure mail as we know it.

Lavabit's Levison: No more palaver, I'm lathered over {redacted}

The issue has become even more of a hot topic among infosec professionals since Texas-based Lavabit – reportedly NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden's preferred email provider – announced it was going to roll down the shutter on services on Thursday.

Ladar Levison, the owner of Lavabit, said the firm had "decided to suspend operations" in the face of US legal pressure over recent weeks as an unpalatable but better alternative to becoming “complicit in crimes against the American people”.

I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit. After significant soul searching, I have decided to suspend operations.

I wish that I could legally share with you the events that led to my decision. I cannot. I feel you deserve to know what’s going on – the first amendment is supposed to guarantee me the freedom to speak out in situations like this. Unfortunately, Congress has passed laws that say otherwise. As things currently stand, I cannot share my experiences over the last six weeks, even though I have twice made the appropriate requests.

Levison is careful not to say this directly, but the implication is that he was either served with a court order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court or a National Security Letter. Both legal documents come with compulsory gag orders. You can see an interview with Nicholas Merrill, one of the few people to win the right to talk about a National Security Letter he was served with, here.)

Man-in-the-middle attack likely only way to get around encryption

Lavabit encrypts stored messages using public key cryptography as well as encrypting the contents of email in transit to guard against eavesdropping. This means that without a customer's private key nobody - not even Levison – can unscramble message.

This is a marked difference from bigger webmail providers such as Google's Gmail or Microsoft's Outlook.com, which hold the keys that would allow them to unscramble messages and turn them over to the authorities, if compelled.

Email stored on Lavabit's servers was encrypted using asymmetric elliptical curve cryptography, as explained in documents about its architecture. This service was only available to holders of premium accounts (among them, reportedly, Edward Snowden, who was said to have maintained the somewhat prosaic address edsnowden@lavabit.com).

The Feds might be seeking to intercept communications in transit between Levabit and its customers using some form of man in-the-middle attack or even seeking to plant government-sanctioned malware, El Reg's security desk speculates. If Snowden was the intended target then all sorts of exotic zero-day exploits might have been brought into play.

This is all complete guesswork on our part and all we know for sure is that Lavabit shut itself down to avoid complying with something it found intolerable while it takes its case to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.

The owner of the boutique email service provider said he hoped to relaunch Lavabit in the US providing its pending appeals court case goes its way. It has begun soliciting donations for a legal defence fund.

Levison said the whole experience had taught him a "very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would _strongly_ recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States," he said.

PGP daddy shuts down new secure email service

Hours later PGP daddy Phil Zimmerman's Silent Circle said it was shutting down its recently inaugurated email service rather than having to face the possibility of receiving a secret court order in future.

The firm is continuing with its core business of supplying secure messaging and encrypted voice apps for smartphones. But Silent Circle said it had unplugged and wiped its email service even in absence of any search or seizure order from government.

"We see the writing the wall, and we have decided that it is best for us to shut down Silent Mail now," Jon Calls, Silent Circle's CTO, explains in a blog post. "We have not received subpoenas, warrants, security letters, or anything else by any government, and this is why we are acting now."

Silent Circle runs its servers in Canada and has plans to expand to Switzerland. For the time being, though, it only has offices in the US and UK. However, despite having a presence outside the US, the owners still decided they wouldn't able to continue Silent Mail in good conscience.

Any UK firm offering similar services to Lavabit and Silent circle would have to comply with RIPA and any other future local law, such as the Snoopers' Charter, if it is ever reanimated.

And any service provider in the EU would be obliged to adhere to the Data Retention Directive, which specifies (among other things) that

each [member state's] authority shall in particular be endowed with investigative powers, such as powers of access to data forming the subject-matter of processing operations and powers to collect all the information necessary for the performance of its supervisory duties.

Setting up a secure ISP in an EU state means living with a regime little more friendly than that which exists in the US.

"All EU member states have to comply with the Data Retention Directive," Brian Honan, of BH Consulting and founder of Ireland's CSIRT told El Reg. "Each EU member state will implement the directive differently and will also have their own local laws too."

Honan said the only secure alternative is a DIY approach using encryption tools such as PGP. And even that approach won't always work – either due to a failure to use the technology properly or malware infection.

"Use PGP on the desktop as only you have access to your private key. For extra protection keep private key separate from PC," Honan told El Reg

more...
who is bert's comment, August 19, 2013 3:15 AM
Thank you for sharing this.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Is 'Fair Use' Unfair To Humans?

Is 'Fair Use' Unfair To Humans? | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
An anonymous reader writes "This article in Wired advances the idea that humans are losing the copyright battle against machines because the fair use laws are tilted against them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

MediaGoblin

MediaGoblin | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

MediaGoblin is a free software media publishing platform that anyone can run. You can think of it as a decentralized alternative to Flickr, YouTube, SoundCloud, etc. It's also:

The perfect tool to show and share your media!Building tools to empower the world through decentralization!Built for extensibility. Multiple media types, including video support!Part of the GNU project and devoted to user freedom.Powered by a community of people like you.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

JoinDiaspora.com - A social networking project for people to control their info

JoinDiaspora.com - A social networking project for people to control their info | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Find detailed information about JoinDiaspora.com - like contact info, an SEO analysis and more - on AboutUs.org
Jan Bergmans's insight:

They're building a new social networking project that they describe as "an open source personal web server that will put individuals in control of their data."

Maxwell Salzberg, Daniel Grippi, Raphael Sofaer and Ilya Zhitomirskiy publicized their project in April 2010, and asked the public for support. They exceeded their $10,000 goal in just 12 days. Subsequent publicity pushed their backing to more than $170,000 by mid-April.

The four partners say their distributed network will connect people's individual computers into a social network. Each person's own computer will hold their Facebook profile, tweets, photographs and other personal data so that every person controls access to his or her own data.

The project was born when the four students listened to Columbia law professor Eben Moglen talk about how easily people are sacrificing the privacy of their personal information to the convenience of using web-hosted social networks and other web-based services.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Generating a private key I can trust

Generating a private key I can trust | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Given last weeks news about the state of cryptography and the influence of the NSA on standards I decided to enter paranoid/tinfoil-hat mode. The result is that I do no longer consider my asymmetri...
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Given last weeks news about the state of cryptography and the influence of the NSA on standards I decided to enter paranoid/tinfoil-hat mode. The result is that I do no longer consider my asymmetric keys as long enough. So I need to regenerate them. This should be an easy task, but I’m in paranoid mode.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Linux is clearly the superior operating system - UVU Review

Linux is clearly the superior operating system - UVU Review | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Linux is hand-down the best option for computing. It isn't even a competition.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

With all due respect, my colleagues are wrong. Linux is hand-down the best option for computing. It isn’t even a competition. Neal Stephenson said: “Macs are hermetically-sealed sedans that look great and have a lot of advertsing. Windows machines are big SUVs that break often, but they’re everywhere and everyone knows how to use them. Linux computers are free tanks that go 90 mph in swamps, get 100 mpg and never break down.”

I’ve been using Linux for years now and don’t ever plan on switching. We can’t explore all the reasons for its superiority, but here are my main points. I’m assuming you know what an operating system is and that Macintosh, Windows and Linux are all different options.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Penguins, prepare to get SPACED OUT: Ubuntu 13.10's Mir has docked • The Register

Penguins, prepare to get SPACED OUT: Ubuntu 13.10's Mir has docked • The Register | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Review Looks can be deceiving, as proved by the first beta of the latest Ubuntu – version 13.10, or Saucy Salamander – which is available today.

This beta doesn't look that different from the last release of Ubuntu earlier this year, but hidden beneath the surface is what might be the biggest change Ubuntu will be making for some time, at least since Unity: the move to the homegrown Mir graphics stack.

 

Mir is Ubuntu's replacement for the X Window System, a necessary part of the company's move beyond the desktop into the world of Ubuntu Mobile, the operating system for Ubuntu Edge and the myriad other devices still just a twinkle in Mark Shuttleworth's eye.

It wouldn't be Ubuntu if there weren't some sort of controversy, (here, here and here), and Mir looks like being no exception.

At this point no one is going to defend X, but there are many who are disappointed Ubuntu will not be using the Wayland graphics stack. Several other distros have already started to use Wayland to replace their own X Window servers, but as with the desktop, Ubuntu has opted to go its own way. If the Mir versus Wayland debate goes the way of the Unity versus Gnome Shell, I'd say Ubuntu has once again made the right call. Only time will really answer that question though – it's far too early to say.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jan Bergmans from University-Lectures-Online
Scoop.it!

Computer Science - Academic Earth: A comprehensive listing of online Computer Science lectures and courses available on the internet

Computer Science - Academic Earth: A comprehensive listing of online Computer Science lectures and courses available on the internet | Linux A Future | Scoop.it

A comprehensive listing of online Computer Science lectures and courses available on the internet.

 

In its purest form, computer science is the research and development of technology that solves specific problems. Computer science has brought the world smart phones, GPS systems, the gaming industry and tablet computing, along with technological developments that assist government, industry and medicine. In addition to creating new technology, computer scientists also make improvements to existing technology and study the ways computers can make our lives easier.

 

As with any branch of science, computer scientists perform research that establishes new information. This research begins with known mathematical algorithms and computer theory, and strives to constantly redefine what technology can do for us. Computer science also addresses how existing technology can be used in ways previously undiscovered, creating applications that may be faster, simpler, more efficient or less costly.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Meet Sol - The Solar-Powered Ubuntu Laptop - OMG! Ubuntu!

Meet the solar-powered laptop with a 10 hour battery, 4 solar panels, running Ubuntu-powered laptop that charges from the sun in 2 hours.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

You know the drill: you’re having a relaxing time browsing cat photos and hamster .gifs on the internet when “ping!” – your laptop battery starts to demand suckling time on the nearest AC power point.

But imagine that all you had to do was reach around the back of your device, unfold some solar panels, and carry on as you were.

‘Sol’ – a new solar-laptop designed for use in military, education and developing nations where access to reliable sources of electricity can be temperamental at best, and non-existent at worst – aims to do just that.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Ubuntu Edge

Ubuntu Edge | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
The Ubuntu Edge is the next generation of personal computing: smartphone and desktop PC in one state-of-the-art device.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Exclusive to Indiegogo backers. The Edge will NOT be available to buy at launch.Specs to be finalised as late as possible to ensure the best available components.Dual-boots into Ubuntu mobile OS and Android; converts into a full desktop PC.Works with LTE and GSM networks, including Verizon and Sprint.Perks include all charges for US and UK, including VAT and delivery.Standard manufacturer warranty will apply once manufacturer is selected.Zero cost to backers if the campaign is unsuccessful.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

3.5 Gb Of Hq Ochestral Sf2!

3.5 Gb Of Hq Ochestral Sf2! | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Over the last 6 months, I was forced to rebuild my soundfont collection, since I had lost it due to a computer change. During this time, I scoured the internet for some of the highest-quality soundfonts, finding some truly unique ones and some great sites. I could just tell you where to find these soundfonts, but it's easier for you if I just give you all of the ones I use. So enjoy 3.5 gigabytes of soundfonts, all grouped into convenient categories.

Percussion
Part 1 (182 mb)
Part 2 (163 mb)

Strings
Part 1 (171 mb)
Part 2 (117 mb)
Part 3 (28 mb)

Brass and Woodwinds (166 mb)

Choir, SFX, and Various (138 mb)

Collections- soundfonts that feature many instruments spanning several categories, such as GM banks.
Part 1 (191 mb)
Part 2 (163 mb)
Part 3 (180 mb)

Note: All files are compressed in .rar format, so you'll need winrar to open them. Also, Bellatrix Orchestral, by far the largest soundfont in this collection, is compressed in SFark format. You'll need SFark to use it.

3.5 Gigabytes of Free HG Orchestral Soundfonts!
Wanna hear them in action? Listen to

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

The People Who Support Linux: Attorney Uses Linux to Aid Firm’s Data Analysis

The People Who Support Linux: Attorney Uses Linux to Aid Firm’s Data Analysis | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Employment attorney Ahmed Minhaj is a Linux desktop user and a new individual member of The Linux Foundation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Buy a Linux Computer - linuxpreloaded.com

Buy a Linux Computer - linuxpreloaded.com | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Linux desktops and laptops from around the world
Jan Bergmans's insight:

No restrictive software to remove;

GNU/Linux working out-of-the-box.

Get a Linux computer without having to pay for a Windows license! The following vendors sell hardware pre-installed with software that’s free as in freedom – so you should not have to remove anything. They were selected for their focus on simplicity and quality.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Moore’s Law could stay on track with extreme UV progress

Moore’s Law could stay on track with extreme UV progress | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Long-awaited improvements in photolithography could pave the way for the continued shrinking and scaling of microprocessors into the second half of this decade and beyond.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jan Bergmans
Scoop.it!

Outreach Program for Women: Lessons in Collaboration - Marina Zhurakhinskaya — GNU MediaGoblin

Jan Bergmans's insight:
Outreach Program for Women: Lessons in Collaboration - Marina Zhurakhinskaya

GNOME's Outreach Program for Women has recently expanded to include multiple free software organizations and has provided 72 women with an opportunity to participate in free software internships. This talk will cover the history of the program, what makes it successful, and how the same strategies can be used for engaging all new contributors.

The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the speaker and do not necessarily reflect those of the Free Software Foundation.

more...
No comment yet.