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Conversational Git: The Friendly Introduction to Git | Architects Zone

Conversational Git: The Friendly Introduction to Git | Architects Zone | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
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These friends are smart people, and if they’re not convinced about Git, the problem is not them; it’s that they haven’t seen the right argument yet. There’s so much content out there about Git, and much of it is written at a level that’s way higher than my expertise. But in a way, that’s an issue. When you’re first starting out learning something, the questions that you have are way different from the questions an experienced person has. Once you’ve won that knowledge, it’s almost impossible to go back and think about what it was like when you were first learning. That puts you in a bad position to explain to someone else who’s brand new.

Git seems particularly prone to this because it’s based on some pretty complex notions of how to think about version control. In particular, once you internalize the concept of the Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) that underlies basically everything in Git, you tend to want to explain that to new people because (a) it can help you think about how Git works; and (b) it’s cool. Unfortunately, teaching Git from a DAG perspective is IMHO the worst way to teach it to new users because it suggests to them that they have to thoroughly understand complex concepts from graph theory to use Git effectively. There’s also no question that the Git help pages use Git-specific jargon, which really interferes with non-experts understanding what a command does.

The book adopts a style that should be accessible to new users. It’s informal , with plenty of first- and second-person references. This is not a “dummies” book; I’m not going to talk down to you, and I’m not going to suggest that you shouldn’t learn complex concepts about Git. But I’m going to try to talk about how I use Git and how I see it being used effectively.

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Linux The Rosetta Stone
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Why kid hackers should have a Linux computer

Why kid hackers should have a Linux computer | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Kid hackers and Linux computers

Kids these days are quite amazing in how fast they learn how to use computers. And what better system for a young hacker than a Linux computer? A writer at Medium recently shared the story of how his young nephew got his very own Linux computer.

[ InfoWorld celebrates Linux at 25: A pictorial history. | How Linux changed the world. | Linus Torvalds on the evolution and future of Linux. | Containers and unikernels prove less is more. | Quick guide to Linux admin essentials. | Stay up on open source with the InfoWorld Linux report. ]
Vesche reports at Medium:

I was visiting my sister recently when I was shocked to discover that my nearly five-year-old nephew had grown into a full-blown walking, talking, little human being! So, naturally my first question was, “Where is this little hackers little computer?” To which I was sadly told that he did not have a computer of his own! Well, that just won’t do.

Let’s talk hardware. If we’re building this little dude a Linux computer and we’re “ballin’ on a budget”, there’s no better choice than a Raspberry Pi. I mean he is a hacker in training, right? His typing (and well, hand coordination in general) isn’t that great yet, so we’ll need an over-sized keyboard. A big mouse pad, and a good wireless mouse will do well. Oh, and how about a VESA mount case for the Raspberry Pi so it stays out of the way? All of that should do nicely.

Alright, let’s get to the meat of this puppy. What’s going on under the hood? Seeing as this kid is the real deal he’s gonna run Arch Linux. I can see his little UNIX(-like) beard coming in already! Joking aside, since the Raspberry Pi uses an ARM processor hop on over to archlinuxarm.org for information on how to install Arch Linux on your Pi.

After a bit of tinkering, we’re ready to start talking software. I first installed Openbox with nodm, which should make the computer easy to just turn on and get going. I was very fortunate to come across a pair of blog posts by a Mr. Alan Moore (no, not the comic book guy) titled: Building a Linux System for a Child Part 1 & Part 2. It’s interesting to note that in the second post Linux distros specifically for children’s education are discussed including DouDouLinux, Qimo, SkoleLinux, and Edbuntu. Also, not discussed in the article (but popular) are Sugar and Ubermix. It was awesome to discover that so many Linux distributions exist solely for children’s education, and perhaps it might be easier for some of you to just install one of these distros instead.

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Building a new Tor that can resist next-generation state surveillance

Building a new Tor that can resist next-generation state surveillance | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Tor is an imperfect privacy platform. Ars meets the researchers trying to replace it.
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Computer programming

Computer programming | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Learn how to program drawings, animations, and games using JavaScript & ProcessingJS, or learn how to create webpages with HTML & CSS. You can share whatever you create, explore what others have created and learn from each other!
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Researchers use acoustic voxels to embed sound with data

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Columbia Engineering researchers, working with colleagues at Disney Research and MIT, have developed a new method to control sound waves, using a computational approach to inversely design acoustic filters that can fit within an arbitrary 3D shape while achieving target sound filtering properties. Led by Computer Science Professor Changxi Zheng, the team designed acoustic voxels, small, hollow, cube-shaped chambers through which sound enters and exits, as a modular system. Like Legos, the voxels can be connected to form an infinitely adjustable, complex structure. Because of their internal chambers, they can modify the acoustic filtering property of the structure -- changing their number and size or how they connect alters the acoustic result.
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Bulgarian Government Embraces Open Source | Software | LinuxInsider

Bulgarian Government Embraces Open Source | Software | LinuxInsider | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Bulgaria's Parliament recently passed legislation mandating open source software to bolster security, as well as to increase competition with commercially coded software. Amendments to the Electronic Governance Act require that all software written for the government be Free and Open Source Software-compliant. The new provisions reportedly took effect this week.
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Kali Linux Downloads – Virtual Images

Kali Linux Downloads – Virtual Images | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Kali Linux Downloads - VMware, VirtualBox and ARM Prebuilt Kali Linux Images, that we would like to share with the community.
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re:publica TEN & EDFVR: Immersion Everywhere

re:publica TEN & EDFVR: Immersion Everywhere | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Virtual Reality goggles at #rp15

The field of VR is creating a lot of excitement in terms of new hardware products, from cameras to VR goggles and full-on VR domes. The 360 degree viewing format is also gaining a foothold in content areas from numerous disciplines. Along with gaming, the potentials of VR have been discovered by music and fashion industry, science, health, film and journalism and are using the technologies in numerous ways (we think back to the great re:publica 2015 talk on the subject of "immersive journalism").

Andreas Gebhard, co-founder and CEO of re:publica, explains: "We feel that the current hype surround VR is justified and that is why we are highlighting it at re:publica TEN and featuring the new possibilities this technology provides for so many sectors, including art and music, entertainment and journalism”. To increase our impact and support synergies and dialogue, re:publica has established a new cooperation with Germany's First Professional Association for Virtual Reality (EDFVR). Arne Ludwig (executive board EDFVR), welcomed this new cooperation: "The whole world has a stake in this new world of technology and so much is yet unexplored. It's self evident that EDFVR and re:publica TEN should cooperative as immersively as possible. Using hashtag #VR HERE, we will be showing of VR, more VR and even more VR through demos, installations and experiences and invite all participants to engage in talks at the VR Lounge."

At re:publica TEN, VR will be represented throughout the conference. One attraction will be the DOMZELT in the re:lax outdoor area with a 10-meter radius. In this dome you can experience various VR content in a group. Furthermore our new experimentation space "labore:tory" will feature 3 days and 3 floors dedicated to the topic of VR. The labre:tory, in the Kühlhaus, will become a learning lab open to all participants who can try out and experiment with various VR recording equipment and technologies on the 2nd floor. The 3rd floor will feature hands-on use of VR glasses and goggles, which will enable you to dive in to new dimensions and experiences. The 2 floors will be in the capable and experienced hands of the EDFVR.

The first floor is dedicated to a different thematic focus each day: the Musicday (2 May) will look at various topics in numerous sessions, including binaural VR and 360 degree recording. We would like to thank Berlin's Senate Department for Economics, Technology and Research for supporting the topics of VR and music. Immersive Arts (3 May) highlights VR and digital art. Immersion means more than simply partaking in the content – we look to dive into the art directly and experience it in a whole new way. Sessions will look at new tools for storytelling through technology. Working practices, possibilities and new perspectives will be highlighted. Day 3 (4 May) will host #FASHIONTECH Berlin and will look at VR's integration into the fashion industry. Could it even become a fashion accessory?

Photo credit: re:publica/Gregor Fischer (CC BY 2.0)
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Take on Endless Electronic Projects with the Tiniest Linux Computer Yet!

VoCore: Mini Linux Computer, Take on Endless Electronic Projects with the Tiniest Linux Computer Yet!
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DESCRIPTION Mini computer boards are getting more popular by the day—but none have been quite as tiny or quite as affordable as VoCore. With this mini Linux machine, you can make a tiny router, invent a new device, build a motherboard, or even repurpose old speakers into smart wireless versions. Its small size gives you options: use it as a standalone device running OpenWrt or use it as an embedded component of a larger system. With some knowledge of electronics and the included Dock that extends the Ethernet and USB ports, the electronic world is your oyster. Works on open-source hardware Provides up to 20 GPIO lines Runs OpenWRT Linux Includes an on-board Wi-Fi adapter so you don’t need an external one Easily connects to peripheral devices Small size enables it to act as an embedded system Extends Ethernet & USB interfaces w/ the Dock Operates as a fully functional 2.4GHz Wi-Firouter Acts as a general purpose low-power COM for IoT applications Includes full hardware design & full-source code Integrates a 802.11n MAC, baseband, radio, FEM & 5-port 10/100Mbps Ethernet switch
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DESCRIPTION Mini computer boards are getting more popular by the day—but none have been quite as tiny or quite as affordable as VoCore. With this mini Linux machine, you can make a tiny router, invent a new device, build a motherboard, or even repurpose old speakers into smart wireless versions. Its small size gives you options: use it as a standalone device running OpenWrt or use it as an embedded component of a larger system. With some knowledge of electronics and the included Dock that extends the Ethernet and USB ports, the electronic world is your oyster. Works on open-source hardware Provides up to 20 GPIO lines Runs OpenWRT Linux Includes an on-board Wi-Fi adapter so you don’t need an external one Easily connects to peripheral devices Small size enables it to act as an embedded system Extends Ethernet & USB interfaces w/ the Dock Operates as a fully functional 2.4GHz Wi-Firouter Acts as a general purpose low-power COM for IoT applications Includes full hardware design & full-source code Integrates a 802.11n MAC, baseband, radio, FEM & 5-port 10/100Mbps Ethernet switch
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What The Tech? LinkedIn Hackers

What The Tech? LinkedIn Hackers | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
LinkedIn has a 'fakes' problem. Hackers are using fake profiles to make connections with people at work. It can lead to some bad things for their employers.

Whether you're looking for a job or just business contacts, LinkedIn is the social media network of choice. CEO's, hiring managers and human resources representatives use LinkedIn as way to announce job openings and search for potential new employees.

In recent months, researcherers at Dell's Counter Threat Unit found 25 fake LinkedIn profiles being used by hackers in the middle east. The profiles look identical to other profiles on the network which include a head­shot profile picture, resume, current job and responsibilities.

The owners of the 'fake accounts' will send out connection requests to other users. Many times when those requests are accepted, users will receive information of new job openings. When they click on a link it can install malware on the users computers. As hackers increasingly attack businesses and corporations, the risk is great. Hackers can install that malware on one computer and in a matter of seconds it can infect the entire computer network.

"I think what most companies don't understand is the depth," said Jeremy Hopwood, a cyber security expert who works with companies to lock down networks and find harmful malware or viruses on company computers.

He said sometimes malware will sit inside the network for days, weeks and even months before being launched.

"Once they've been weaponized and detonated within the business, it spreads within seconds." Dell uncovered the fake LinkedIn profiles and identified what it terms 'leaders' and supporters. By connecting with themselves, it gives the impression the profiles are legit and other users are more likely to accept the connection request.

LinkedIn is now asking users to report any suspicious connections that might be fakes. The best practice, is to only accept requests from people you know for a fact are real people.
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Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 15.10 Highlights [VIDEO]

Shuttleworth explains how the .deb packaging format remains in place, even in a world where Ubuntu is embracing Snappy.
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Tails 2.6 — Ultra-secure Linux OS Used By Snowden Gets Updated Tor And Kernel

ails is a security-focused Linux distribution that aims to provide you anonymity. This Debian-based live Linux distro forces all outgoing connections to pass through Tor. It helps you avert censorship and comes with pre-configured tools for email, office work, image editing, sound editor, IM client etc.
The latest version of Tails Live CD Linux operating system has been released by the Tails development team. Tails 2.6 brings many new features, updated components, and security fixes. Due to numerous bug fixes and security advisories by Mozilla and Debian, the Tails development team advises the users to upgrade as soon as possible.

New features and changes in Tails 2.6

One of the major additions in Tails 2.6 comes in the form of address space layout randomization, also known as ASLR, in the Linux kernel. It’s a computer security technique that provides protection from buffer overflow attacks. To stop the attacker from jumping to a particular exploited function, this technique randomly arranges the address space positions of key data areas.

Another notable feature is the installation of rngd to improve the entropy of random numbers generated on computers that are equipped with hardware for random number generation.



Updated packages — Tor, Tor Browser, Icedove and more

Tails 2.6 Live CD Linux operating system comes with numerous package upgrades. This Debian-based distro comes with Tor 0.2.8.7 and the recently released Tor Browser 6.0.5. Other upgraded packages are Icedove 45.2.0, Tor Birdy 0.2.0, and Electrum 2.6.4.

Tails 2.6 also features firmware for Intel SST sound cards and Texas Instruments Wi-Fi interfaces.

This release is based on Linux 4.6, which should improve the support for newer hardware.

How to get Tails 2.6?

If you are running Tails 2.5, there’s an automatic upgrade available. However, if wish to try out this privacy-focused operating system, you can grab it from Tails 2.6 Download page.

The next Tails release, i.e., Tails 2.7 is scheduled to arrive in November. Save the date.

Did you find this article helpful? Don’t forget to drop your feedback in the comments section below.
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Download Ubuntu Kylin | Download | Ubuntu

Download Ubuntu Kylin
Ubuntu Kylin 16.04.1 LTS

Download the long-term support edition of Ubuntu Kylin 16.04.1 LTS ISO image file. To install Ubuntu Kylin, burn the image file on a DVD or create a bootable USB disk.

Download 64-bit

Download 32-bit
If you have an older PC with less than 2GB of memory, choose the 32-bit download.
Ubuntu 中国网站现已面世
BitTorrent

If you prefer, you can download Ubuntu Kylin 16.04 LTS via a torrent.

64-bit torrent
32-bit torrent
The community is here to help

To learn more about Ubuntu Kylin or get help on installing or using it.

Visit ubuntukylin.com
Helping hands

If you get stuck, help is always at hand.

Jan Bergmans's insight:
Download Ubuntu Kylin Ubuntu Kylin 16.04.1 LTS Download the long-term support edition of Ubuntu Kylin 16.04.1 LTS ISO image file. To install Ubuntu Kylin, burn the image file on a DVD or create a bootable USB disk. Download 64-bit Download 32-bit If you have an older PC with less than 2GB of memory, choose the 32-bit download. Ubuntu 中国网站现已面世 BitTorrent If you prefer, you can download Ubuntu Kylin 16.04 LTS via a torrent. 64-bit torrent 32-bit torrent The community is here to help To learn more about Ubuntu Kylin or get help on installing or using it. Visit ubuntukylin.com Helping hands If you get stuck, help is always at hand. Ask Ubuntu Ubuntu Forums IRC-based support 
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Top 20 most used basics linux commands for new linux users

This vedio will show you how to run and understand the basic command in linux.
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Linux 4.7 Shows How Far the Open-Source OS Has Come in 25 Years

Linux 4.7 Shows How Far the Open-Source OS Has Come in 25 Years | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
This year marks a special anniversary for Linux, as the open-source operating system turns 25. What started out as the effort of a single man has grown into a massive distributed effort, benefiting from the contributions of hundreds of companies and thousands of developers. At this year’s LinuxCon North America conference, the Linux Foundation released the latest edition of the Linux Kernel Development report, providing insight into the latest kernel development. The 2016 report highlights development efforts spanning from the Linux 3.19 kernel, which was released Feb. 9, 2015, to the Linux 4.7 kernel released July 24. The previous version of the report debuted in March 2015 and focused on the Linux 3.11 to 3.18 kernel releases. Since March 2015, innovation in the Linux kernel has further accelerated: During the new report period, an average of 7.8 changes were accepted into the Linux kernel every hour, up from 7.71 in the last report. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at the highlights of the 25th anniversary edition of the Linux Kernel Development report.

Via Gordon Dahlby, Anna
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The Linux Foundation extends dedication to Linux security with new online skills training - SD Times

The Linux Foundation extends dedication to Linux security with new online skills training - SD Times | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, has announced the availability of a new online learning course, Linux Security Fundamentals (LFS216). This self-paced course is an extension of The Linux Foundation’s dedication to helping secure the internet and other Linux and open source software and IT infrastructure.

“Open Source software underpins most of the Internet, facilitating trillions of dollars of business, but many projects lack rigorous security process,” said Nicko van Someren, chief technology officer at The Linux Foundation. “From day one, training and education play a key role in ensuring open source projects obtain a high state of security, quality and resiliency. Whether open or closed, software security must begin early on to minimize risk.”

Along with supporting the development of Linux and other mission-critical open source software, The Linux Foundation has taken steps to help ensure that the software it helps to produce is secure and users have all resources they need to be successful. Efforts include the Core Infrastructure Initiative’s Badges Program, in which open source projects like OpenStack are able to demonstrate security-conscious development. With Let’s Encrypt, The Linux Foundation and its partners have helped secure more than 5 million websites, and hope to eventually achieve a 100% secure web using HTTPS. Skills training that educates users on how to maximize system security is an essential complement to these initiatives.

The Linux Security Fundamentals class covers the basics that every IT professional working with Linux must know. It starts with an overview of computer security and touches on how security affects everyone in the chain of development, implementation, administration and end use.

Specific topics covered include:

Threats and Risk Assessment
Auditing and Detection
Application Security
Kernel Vulnerabilities
Local System Security
Network Security
Denial of Service (DoS)
Firewalling and Packet Filtering
LFS216 is intended for those involved with security related tasks at all levels. The hand-ons class uses virtual appliances to demonstrate “what happens when” rather than relying on typing exercises to configure complex servers. After completing this course, students will be able to assess current security needs, evaluate current security readiness and implement security options as required. This course is the second security offering for The Linux Foundation, the first being an instructor-led LInux Security (LFS416) course which has been offered since 2013.

“We recognize that security is a concern for any IT organization, which is why The Linux Foundation hosts initiatives such as the Core Infrastructure Initiative and Let’s Encrypt, which help make it easier to protect sensitive data and systems,” said Linux Foundation Training General Manager Clyde Seepersad. “These high-level efforts can only do so much though, so making it easier to train staff at all levels in security best practices is essential for ensuring all systems remain stable and secure.”

LFS216 is now available for enrollment for $199. In celebration of the 25th anniversary of Linux, through August 28, individuals may purchase a bundle including the new Linux Security Fundamentals course along with LFS201 – Essentials of System Administration, LFS211 – Linux Networking and Administration, and LFS265 – Software Defined Networking Fundamentals for only $250, a savings of 75%. This bundle will provide aspiring Linux system administrators with all the knowledge they need to start in the field, and prepare them for a Linux Foundation Certified Sysadmin exam.
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22 open source tools for creatives

22 open source tools for creatives | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Blender: 3D modeling, animation, video editing
InkScape: Vector graphics
GIMP: Raster image editing
Krita: Illustration
Audacity: Audio editing
VLC: Video player
Scribus: Desktop publishing
calibre Digital publishing
SIGIL: Digital publishing
'afterwriting: Screenwriting
Trelby: Screenwriting
MyPaint: Illustration
Kdenlive: Video editing
OpenShot: Video editing
Shotcut: Video editing
Natron: Compositing and post-processing
Ardour: Sound mixing and recording
Qtractor: Sound mixing and recording
Rosegarden: Music scoring
MuseScore: Music scoring
Hydrogen: Drum machine
Meshlab: Modeling clean-up for 3D printing
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Blender: 3D modeling, animation, video editing InkScape: Vector graphics GIMP: Raster image editing Krita: Illustration Audacity: Audio editing VLC: Video player Scribus: Desktop publishing calibre Digital publishing SIGIL: Digital publishing 'afterwriting: Screenwriting Trelby: Screenwriting MyPaint: Illustration Kdenlive: Video editing OpenShot: Video editing Shotcut: Video editing Natron: Compositing and post-processing Ardour: Sound mixing and recording Qtractor: Sound mixing and recording Rosegarden: Music scoring MuseScore: Music scoring Hydrogen: Drum machine Meshlab: Modeling clean-up for 3D printing
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North American Cities Are Slow To Adopt Open Source Software - Contributed Content on Top Tech News

North American Cities Are Slow To Adopt Open Source Software - Contributed Content on Top Tech News | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Cities that want to make the move to open source should take the following steps:

1. Look for upcoming end-of-life or expiry of existing proprietary licenses as an opportunity to migrate away from them to something less expensive.

2. Look at the subscription model of some critical open source software as a way to move necessary purchases to an operating expense budget as opposed to a capital expenditure budget and eliminate large budget outlays for new or renewed proprietary software.

3. Prepare a reasonable transition plan that will accommodate any training and adjustment of staff to new applications.

4. Ensure when budgeting that the total cost of ownership is considered over the lifespan of the project and not just the upfront initial costs.

5. Use software that will allow IT to run both Windows and open source software side by side during the transition period.

6. Find the political willpower to get it done. This will require action by elected officials, but it may need leadership from IT to show them what can be done.

The move to open source is inevitable as open source communities of developers continue to work on thousands of applications and as more software development companies invest in an open source model to allow for greater flexibility and lower end user prices than existing proprietary competitors. Europe has more than a decade head start on North American cities. The quality of available open source software has improved so much in that decade that the transition can be far easier for cities starting now, than it was for Munich when they got the ball rolling in Europe.

Kevin Gallagher is CEO of Inuvika Inc., a Toronto based open source company that delivers application virtualization software. www.inuvika.com

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.6 Soon, GCC 6 Migration in Progress

openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.6 Soon, GCC 6 Migration in Progress | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
First of all, users are being informed that the first Alpha release of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system is now available for download and testing. However, the development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 has just started, and it looks like the final release lands in the first week of November 2016.

Secondly, openSUSE Tumbleweed users should be aware of the fact that the latest KDE Applications 16.04.1 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment has landed on May 29, along with many other software updates, such as GTK+ 3.20.6, libpng16 1.6.22, and Wine 1.9.11.

"GNOME’s GTK3 updated from 3.20.4 to 3.20.6 in the snapshot and libvirt has updated subpackages mostly for drivers as well as some for client, storage and daemon-config-network. Yast2-dns-server is available for update with version 3.1.21 in the Tumbleweed repositories," said Douglas DeMaio in today's announcement.

And now for the good news, as according to Douglas DeMaio, the Linux 4.6 kernel should land by the end of the week in the main software repositories for openSUSE Tumbleweed, along with the Perl 5.24 packages. In the meantime, the openSUSE developers are concentrating all of their efforts on the GCC 6 migration.

#openSUSE Tumbleweed#Linux kernel 4.6#KDE Applications 16.04.1#GCC 6#Perl 5.24
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What Does It Mean To Be Bilingual?

What Does It Mean To Be Bilingual? | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
World and language

Language creates our first connection to the world. The newborn child that takes a deep breath and cries out is both expressing itself and letting the world know it’s there. During infancy, grammar and vocabulary emerge (in all cultures, if you believe Chomsky’s idea of Universal Grammar) and influence how you engage with the world (if you subscribe to a more Whorfian view that language affects perception).

What about people who possess two possible linguistic systems to express an idea or a feeling? For a long time bilingualism was considered negative: The overwhelming opinion was that such an upbringing could cause confusion, especially in small children. Then in 1962, a study from Peal and Lambert that looked at the relationship between intelligence and language fundamentally altered the outlook. More recent studies have even claimed that bilingual people have a stronger “meta-linguistic awareness,” which applies to problem solving in areas outside of language, such as mathematics.

Although we can quantify some of the cognitive benefits of bilingualism, there are still many questions about how the bilingual brain works. Does it “choose” one of the language paths instead of the other? Is this influenced by ease, or context, or which synapses have been most strengthened over time? (This opens up a whole new can of worms – the idea of both languages being “equally strong” is also a red herring.) Researchers such as Lera Boroditsky have described differences between mono- and bilinguals in perceptions of color, and representations of time.

Brot, baguette and cognitive reference systems

The idea of having different linguistic systems can be illustrated by the difference between the German Brot and the French baguette – both essentially referring to bread. On the one hand, you’ve got that warm, golden brown, crunchy baguette, which you might dunk in a coffee or enjoy with a five-course cheese platter. On the other side is dark Brot, pure or with grains, moist and compact, healthy, delicious and filling. The words do not live in the same imaginary worlds; they conjure different memories, emotions and cultural references. They belong to different cognitive reference systems, and a bilingual person who wishes to speak of bread has a variety of means available to them.

A comparison with synesthesia illuminates the concept further. Those affected by synesthesia confuse two senses, like seeing and hearing. A synesthete might literally see music in the form of different colors, and therefore have access to two senses that help them describe the music. As a consequence their description may appear richer, more metaphorical or figurative. Many poems, as well as expressions in everyday use, draw on synesthetic principles – that’s why we speak of warm or cold colors. The more connections in the brain, the more conceptual possibilities are awoken. This so-called cognitive flexibility is associated with creativity and seems particularly pronounced among bilingual people.

Happy accidents

Weird and wonderful cross-linguistic inventions can occur when you juggle more than one language on a daily basis. If a word slips your mind, or indeed there is no other way to express something, you can grab for a solution from another language… I remember having coffee with a German friend and making a particularly excellent (okay, awful) pun. She looked up at me with a grimace and asked me “if I’d had a clown for breakfast.” She speaks both English and German, and that creative phrase is how she needed to express herself in that moment.

III – Carpe diem

Only 13% of all UN countries are officially monolingual. If you grew up in one of them (United States, Australia, England, here’s looking at you), don’t despair. It’s not too late to take the plunge. Learning a new language is like exercise for your brain: it helps stimulate and increase brain connections.

Some claim that language learning has influenced their life and personality, that they are more open, creative, confident and tolerant in the new language. It’s certainly true that languages change people – it’s not uncommon to see a different side of them when they’re speaking another tongue. So seize the day – free the clown – and start learning that language.

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Pedro and Héctor discuss raising kids bilingually in Germany

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Firefox Developer Edition

Firefox Developer Edition | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Built for those who build the Web. The only browser made for developers like you.
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Open source geeks in a world of silos

Open source geeks in a world of silos | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
You pretty famously kicked Google out of your life for a while, but let parts of it back in. Which side of the silo argument are you taking?

Oh, heavens. This is something I struggle with every damned day. In a nutshell: Having locked silos is a very, very bad thing. But it's hard as hell to avoid. For example: I'm a pretty die-hard Linux user, but I'm also an avid gamer. That means I tend to either have the Google Play Store (to install Android games) or Steam (for desktop Linux games) running on most of my systems. But I feel really, really dirty about it.
What arguments do you expect from your opponent, and why are they terrible?

Honestly, I have no clue what my opponent is going to say! This particular session has me and my co-presenter going mano a mano on the topic, which I expect to be rather challenging as he is an incredibly smart guy. Right now, I'm just hoping I can hold my own on why silos are so dangerous. Personal data access, personal data ownership, personal data security, longevity of software and so many other reasons are on my side, so here's hoping!
Can open source software ever hope to win against the convenience of shiny proprietary silos?

Yes. Maybe? Gosh. I hope so. Wait. What does "win" mean?
"Win" means gain mass adoption and the adulation of millennials and grandfathers alike.

Oh, lord. Millennials and Grandfathers, eh? Honestly I think mass adoption of (free and) open source alternatives to the closed, locked down application (and content) store silos will happen when the open options are, quite simply, better than their closed cousins in most ways that matter to people.

Approachability, easy of use, selection of software, promotion by the software publishers people trust... When a FOSS alternative to, say, the Google Play Store can manage to check all of those checkboxes, I have no doubt that mass adoption will follow.

The real question is, who will do it? Canonical tried with the Ubuntu Software Center—which, speaking as someone who sold software through it, was never quite ready for prime time. There have been a few other noteworthy attempts (such as Click'N'Run), but none ever worked well enough to capture significant market share.

In my opinion, the current best bet would be GNOME Software. It's not all the way there yet, but it shows promise.

I think an even bigger problem than "app store" and content silos is the prevalence of data silos—closed, online systems that store huge quantities of your data. Email. Documents. Pictures. Passwords. If all of these things are online and in closed silos, you really don't have any control over your own data.

And that scares the crap out of me.
You've been involved in open source communities for a long time, but you were recently elected to the openSUSE Board. What have you learned in the last month that surprised you?

The biggest surprise, to me, is what mean, terrible jerks my fellow openSUSE board members are. They all got together and conspired against me—they scheduled our regular board meetings for five-freaking-a.m. in the morning. Five in the morning! They gave me lame excuses like how they "live in Europe" and it was "the only time that worked for everyone." Pssht.

I am confident they are forcing me to wake up at this ungodly hour simply because they have hearts of pure ice. (Other than that, they're nice guys.)

No other big surprises yet. The openSUSE project runs itself in such an open way. I've been able to observe how it works from the outside for years. Now I'm just... less on the outside.
You gave a talk at SCALE 14x called Linux sucks, but you've published a book called Linux is Badass. Why are you flip-flopping?

Ha! Linux Sucks is, itself, the ultimate flip-flop. The first half is why it sucks. The second half is why it absolutely, without the slightest doubt, does not. I like to play devil's advocate with myself. Also, it makes for a fun event. My book Linux is Badass, on the other hand, is sort of a love poem to Linux in the form of essays. And actual poems. And a choose your own adventure story. With swear words. (It's a really weird book.)

I typically give a yearly Linux sucks at LinuxFest Northwest. (Except for last year, when I gave the Windows is awesome presentation to a packed audience at a Linux conference. That still boggles my mind.) But this year, I decided to do something a bit more... goofy. I'm calling it simply Linux is weird. It's basically a ridiculous journey through all the weirdest and most insane things about Linux. It's going to be nuts.
What LinuxFest Northwest talks are you most interested in?

It's hard for me to typically get a chance to see more than one or two presentations at an event like this. At LinuxFest Northwest I think I'm presenting three this year (Linux is weird, the one about silos that we talked about, and a third that is a Q&A with me and the openSUSE board director). When I'm not doing those, I'll probably be spending time at the openSUSE lounge (We don't have a traditional "booth" this year. We went for a full-on lounge.) giving out chameleon plushies and chatting with folks.

If I get a chance, I'd love to make it to John Sullivan's (director of the FSF) session comparing Free Software to veganism. That sounds like fun. And there's one on openQA (an automated testing platform) that is being co-presented by people from both SUSE and Red Hat. I love it when the big Linux companies come together in peace and harmony—plus, both of the presenters are friends. So if I miss that one, I'll probably never hear the end of it. And there's at least three sessions in the legal and licensing track that sound damned interesting. We'll see if I manage to make it to more than one of these.
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How to build a kernel module with DKMS on Linux - Xmodulo

How to build a kernel module with DKMS on Linux - Xmodulo | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
dkms add ixgbe/4.3.15

Build the specified module against the currently running kernel.
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How to Detect Ransomware with FileAudit - Enterprise Network Security Blog from ISDecisions

How to Detect Ransomware with FileAudit - Enterprise Network Security Blog from ISDecisions | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Detecting massive file encryption on a file server with FileAudit's mass access alerts is one of several measures to protect against ransomware attacks.
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