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Dutch gov. proposes cyberattacks against... Everyone > Comments

Dutch gov. proposes cyberattacks against... Everyone > Comments | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
"Last week, the Dutch Minister of Safety and Justice asked the Parliament of the Netherlands to pass a law allowing police to obtain warrants to do the following: install malware on targets’ private computers, conduct remote searches on local and foreign computers to collect evidence, and delete data on remote computers in order to disable the accessibility of 'illegal files'. Requesting assistance from the country where the targetted computer(s) were located would be 'preferred' but possibly not required. These proposals are alarming, could have extremely problematic consequences, and may violate European human rights law." You get true net neutrality with one hand, but this idiocy with another. This reminds me a lot of how some of our busy intersections are designed; by people who bike to city hall all their lives and have no clue what it's like to drive a car across their pretty but extremely confusing and hence dangerous intersections.
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Linux The Rosetta Stone
Curated by Jan Bergmans
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The threats of Facebook and data mining explained by Eben Moglen : sous-titré en français

Eben Moglen talks about freedom of thought, data mining, facebook, google, Steve Jobs' death, and what we can do about it. Re:Publica, Pourquoi la liberté de...
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Hugo Moshpit's curator insight, May 12, 2013 7:59 AM

Les dangers du "Data Mining" et de Facebook

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Transitioning from Windows to Linux Administration: A guide for newcomers - Tech Pro Research

Transitioning from Windows to Linux Administration: A guide for newcomers - Tech Pro Research | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Prerequisites for users of this guide are familiarity with concepts of system administration such as creating users, working with permissions, managing programs and processes, configuring hardware such as network details and hard drives and reviewing event logs for errors. Furthermore, these tips and screenshots are based on Red Hat Linux administration, since that is generally the corporate standard, but should also work on most if not all other Linux flavors.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Prerequisites for users of this guide are familiarity with concepts of system administration such as creating users, working with permissions, managing programs and processes, configuring hardware such as network details and hard drives and reviewing event logs for errors. Furthermore, these tips and screenshots are based on Red Hat Linux administration, since that is generally the corporate standard, but should also work on most if not all other Linux flavors.

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edX

edX | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
EdX offers free online courses and classes. Find the latest MOOC from the world’s best universities including MIT, Harvard, Berkeley, UT and others. Topics include business, computer science, finance, history, literature, math, science, statistics and more.
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Anonabox wants to bring plug-and-play TOR privacy to the masses

Anonabox wants to bring plug-and-play TOR privacy to the masses | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Over on Kickstarter, there’s another new gadget up for sale. Thankfully, it’s not yet another smartwatch; it’s a pocket-sized box that brings the anonymity of TOR to your home network.
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MEGA Has Received An Official Linux Client. How To Install Mega Sync 1.0.29 On Ubuntu

Jan Bergmans's insight:

Hello Linux Geeksters. As you may know, MEGA is a cloud storage service that provides 50 GB free space on the cloud, allowing the users to backup and share files. This storage service is famous because its encryption, the users being able to login via RSA 2048-bit keys.

Recently, an official MEGA client, called MEGA Sync has been released for Linux, allowing the users to easily backup and sync files and folders, on different computers.

MEGA Sync 1.0.29 is available for the latest Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and OpenSUSE systems. Also, nautilus-megasync is available, for providing Nautilus integration for the MEGA sync client.

In this article I will show you how to install MEGA Sync 1.0.29 on Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr, Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin, Debian 7 Wheezy, Fedora 20, Fedora 19, OpenSUSE 13.1 and OpenSUSE 12.3.

Follow the instructions for your system and architecture exactly, in order to get a successful installation.

How to install MEGA Sync 1.0.29 on Ubuntu 14.04 systems:
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Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux

Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Beignet is the project out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center for exposing GPGPU/compute capabilities out of Ivy Bridge hardware and newer when using a fully open-source Linux stack.
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Ask Slashdot: Best Phone Apps?

Ask Slashdot: Best Phone Apps? | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
An anonymous reader writes: The phone app ecosystem has matured nicely over the past several years. There are apps for just about everything I need to do on my phone.
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Senator Calls On FCC To Hold Net Neutrality Round Tables Outside Of Washington

Senator Calls On FCC To Hold Net Neutrality Round Tables Outside Of Washington | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
 Senator Patrick Leahy recently called on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to host roundtable discussions concerning net neutrality outside of Washington.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

The FCC should heed the senator’s call and follow through with hosting sessions around the country. It would be reasonable for the FCC to, say, hold a roundtable or three here in Silicon Valley, given the technology industry’s obvious stake in the Internet’s health.

The senator noted that he recently spoke to a number of companies in his home state of Vermont that depend on the Internet to do business. They have a stake in preserving an open Internet as well:

In July, I held a Senate Judiciary Committee field hearing in Vermont on the importance of protecting an open Internet.  That hearing allowed the Committee to hear from voices that otherwise would not have had an opportunity to be heard in Washington.  These voices included small business owners like Cabot Orton of the Vermont Country Store and Lisa Groeneveld of Logic Supply, Inc.  Both of these companies are great Vermont success stories thanks to the equalizing power of the Internet.

The issue of net neutrality is no small matter, and it has attracted mainstream attention.

 

Precisely what sort of net neutrality rules will eventually be passed isn’t clear. It isn’t clear of paid prioritization will find its way in the coming set of regulations. And it also is not yet clear what legal standing the FCC will select to base its rules upon. Soliciting feedback inside of Washington isn’t a bad idea. But also picking up a few in-person comments outside the Beltway isn’t such a bad idea either.

The FCC responded to a request for comment on the senator’s suggestion by saying, “The roundtable events are designed to incorporate a wide range of views on this important topic, and they will be open to the public and streamed live online.  In addition, both online viewers and those who attend in person will have the opportunity to ask questions.”

IMAGE BY FLICKR USER DANNY HUIZINGA UNDER CC BY 2.0 LICENSE (IMAGE HAS BEEN MODIFIED)

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Unix & Linux Stack Exchange

Unix & Linux Stack Exchange | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Q&A for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.
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Unix & Linux Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.. It's 100% free, no registration required. 

Take the 2-minute tourHere's how it works:Anybody can ask a questionAnybody can answerThe best answers are voted up and rise to the top  
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Free Software Foundation (fsf) - http://status.fsf.org

Free Software Foundation (fsf) - http://status.fsf.org | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Fighting for essential freedoms for computer users since 1985.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

FSF responds to today's US Supreme Court ruling on Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank. https://u.fsf.org/102

about a day ago from web

"Active Management Technology": The obscure remote control in some Intel hardware. https://u.fsf.org/101

about a day ago from web

US Supreme Court rules on Alice Corp v. CLS Bank software patent case. FSF statement coming soon. (PDF) https://u.fsf.org/100

about 2 days ago from web

Abhishek Bhowmick assigned copyright to GNU Radio! Contribute to GNU: https://u.fsf.org/xe

about 2 days ago from web

Join us this Friday, from 2pm to 5pm EDT (19:00 to 22:00 UTC), to help improve the Free Software Directory in #fsf on freenode.

about 2 days ago from web

Everyone deserves privacy. Our new #EmailSelfDefense guide makes it easy to secure your communications. https://u.fsf.org/yy

about 3 days ago from web

Boston @CiviCRM meetup tonight at the FSF office 7:00pm. https://u.fsf.org/zx

about 4 days ago from web

This is why we need a free software replacement for Skype! "Witnesses allowed to testify via Skype in some trials" https://u.fsf.org/zv

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IT Consultancy| LINUXIT

IT Consultancy| LINUXIT | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
LinuxIT is an agile IT specialising in Linux and Open Source Software specialist with an unrivalled record in the deployment of associated best practice system management technologies into the private and public sectors.
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Linux A Future ;-)

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Aptik 1.4 released and Ubuntu ppa installation instructions included

Sponsored Link
Aptik is a new tool to simplify re-installation of packages after doing a clean installation of an Ubuntu-based distribution. It can be used while re-installing or upgrading to the next Ubuntu/Linux Mint release.
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What is edX? - MIT News Office

What is edX? - MIT News Office | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Answering common questions about MIT and Harvard’s new partnership in online education.
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What technology will edX use?
An open-source online learning platform that will feature teaching designed specifically for the Web. Features will include: self-paced learning, online discussion groups, wiki-based collaborative learning, assessment of learning as a student progresses through a course, and online laboratories. The platform will also serve as a laboratory from which data will be gathered to better understand how students learn. Because it is open-source, the platform will be improved continuously.

Is there anything innovative about the online technology?
Yes. It will move beyond the standard model of online education that relies on watching video content and will offer an interactive experience for students. And the technology will be open-source; other universities will be able to leverage the innovative technology to create their own online offerings.

Why are MIT and Harvard doing this?
To improve education on campus and around the world:

On campus, edX research will enhance our understanding of how students learn and how technologies can best be used as part of our larger efforts to improve teaching and learning.Beyond our campuses, edX will expand access to education, allow for certificates of mastery to be earned by able learners, and make the open-source platform available to other institutions.

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Test Your PHP App for Free on IBM's New POWER8 Servers

IBM's ecosytem development team has created a cloud environment for functional testing to help raise awareness of its partner-based Linux on POWER8 LAMP (Linux + Apache + MySQL + PHP) stack alternative, nicknamed Turbo LAMP. Their partners include Ubuntu supported by Canonical, which offers Linux scale-out performance and rapid provisioning with its JuJu Charms framework; Zend’s PHP Server for enterprise scale and security; and MariaDB with MySQL compatibility.

Turbo LAMP exploits POWER8 architecture with 2x or better performance than comparable x86 servers for data intensive workloads, says Leamon Hall, leader of ecosystem development for Linux on Power at IBM. In addition, Mellanox is providing a 40 GB network fabric that integrates with the full stack to deliver the highest performance cloud infrastructure, though this piece isn't included in the test environment for this promotion.

“Turbo LAMP is another step in showing our leadership in Linux by bringing key partners together in an innovative stack that is optimized with each other's software to take advantage of the extreme performance that you get on POWER8,” Hall said.

The Turbo LAMP stack provides a standard open source based LAMP stack to enable PHP applications to just run as-is on IBM’s new POWER8 servers. In addition, each component of the stack has been tuned for optimal performance and integrated with JuJu Charms for rapid cloud provisioning, Hall said.

POWER8 processors, introduced in April as integral to IBM's first open servers designed for big data, offer eight-way multithreading for four times more threads along with 4x greater memory bandwidth than a commodity x86 processor, according to the company. By combining the Power8 technology with the Turbo LAMP stack, IBM aims to offer a supported hardware and software solution that can be installed on-premise for private clouds or accessed via a public cloud.

“All of a sudden you can do more with less. So for a private cloud or a cloud service provider that means a more cost-effective infrastructure longer term,” Hall said. “And it means an extensible architecture that can grow much larger without having to add a lot of hardware along the way.”

The Linux on Power Turbo LAMP App-a-Thon is a great opportunity for developers looking for a solution to help bump up their proof of technology application to one that meets enterprise-grade performance and security criteria, Hall said. E-commerce or content-based applications, in particular, are likely to reap the benefits of the Turbo LAMP/ Power8 combination, as well as applications that are data-intensive.

“Demanding apps that might require 20 cores of processors can benefit from 160 threads vs. only 40 threads on an x86 based LAMP server. Especially for a server that needs to support applications with large numbers of users and high volume data transfer rates between MariaDB and Zend (which typically happens in e-commerce), the Turbo LAMP stack would be very well-suited for this,” Hall said.

Anyone who registers for the App-a-Thon will have remote access to test their apps on IBM's hardware. And IBM is offering other incentives for testing, including a two-week optimization and sizing guide with IBM Innovation Center on Turbo LAMP full stack with Mellanox 40Gb network fabric and a customized “go to market” and channel assessment with IBM Power Sales.

To see the full details and to register visit https://ibm.biz/tlamp-start
Libby Clark
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Top 10 Linux Holiday Gifts for 2014 (Slideshow)

Top 10 Linux Holiday Gifts for 2014 (Slideshow) | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
All 10 of these devices run Linux out of the box, were launched publicly in 2014, and are currently available to the general public, with a good chance of arriving at your doorstep by Dec. 24. Most are under $200, and several are under $100. The priciest is the $329 Toshiba Chromebook 2, which is by most accounts the best Chromebook yet.

We could not find a suitable, preconfigured notebook running other Linux distros for that price. We did, however, include Cloudsto's Picuntu (Ubuntu) equipped Rikomagic MK902 LE media player mini-PC for only $109, and the popular Raspberry Pi based Kano Kit educational computer for kids, which sells for $150.

Like last year, in order to keep the list focused, there are no Android-only products here, and I've stayed away from single board computers. However, several intriguing community-based SBCs launched this year that could be just the thing for your more techie minded friends, and most, like the $35 Raspberry Pi Model B+, are well below $100.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

All 10 of these devices run Linux out of the box, were launched publicly in 2014, and are currently available to the general public, with a good chance of arriving at your doorstep by Dec. 24. Most are under $200, and several are under $100. The priciest is the $329 Toshiba Chromebook 2, which is by most accounts the best Chromebook yet.

We could not find a suitable, preconfigured notebook running other Linux distros for that price. We did, however, include Cloudsto's Picuntu (Ubuntu) equipped Rikomagic MK902 LE media player mini-PC for only $109, and the popular Raspberry Pi based Kano Kit educational computer for kids, which sells for $150.

Like last year, in order to keep the list focused, there are no Android-only products here, and I've stayed away from single board computers. However, several intriguing community-based SBCs launched this year that could be just the thing for your more techie minded friends, and most, like the $35 Raspberry Pi Model B+, are well below $100.

 

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Private donors supply spy gear to cops

Private donors supply spy gear to cops | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
There's little scrutiny when private donors pay for controversial tech.
Jan Bergmans's insight:

In 2007, as it pushed to build a state-of-the-art surveillance facility, the Los Angeles Police Department cast an acquisitive eye on software being developed by Palantir, a startup funded in part by the Central Intelligence Agency's venture capital arm.

Originally designed for spy agencies, Palantir's technology allowed users to track individuals with unprecedented reach, connecting information from conventional sources like crime reports with more controversial data gathered by surveillance cameras and license plate readers that automatically, and indiscriminately, photographed passing cars.

The LAPD could have used a small portion of its multibillion-dollar annual budget to purchase the software, but that would have meant going through a year-long process requiring public meetings, approval from the City Council, and, in some cases, competitive bidding.

There was a quicker, quieter way to get the software: as a gift from the Los Angeles Police Foundation, a private charity. In November 2007, at the behest of then Police Chief William Bratton, the foundation approached Target Corp., which contributed $200,000 to buy the software, said the foundation's executive director, Cecilia Glassman, in an interview. Then the foundation donated it to the police department.

Across the nation, private foundations are increasingly being tapped to provide police with technology and weaponry that—were it purchased with public money—would come under far closer scrutiny.

In Los Angeles, foundation money has been used to buy hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of license plate readers, which were the subject of a civil-rights lawsuit filed against the region's law enforcement agencies by the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. (A judge rejected the groups' claims earlier this year.)

Private funds also have been used to upgrade "Stingray" devices, which have triggered debate in numerous jurisdictions because they vacuum up records of cellphone metadata, calls, text messages, and data transfers over a half-mile radius.

New York and Los Angeles have the nation's oldest and most generous police foundations, each providing their city police departments with grants totaling about $3 million a year. But similar groups have sprouted up in dozens of jurisdictions, from Atlanta, Georgia, to Oakland, California. In Atlanta, the police foundation has bankrolled the surveillance cameras that now blanket the city, as well as the center where police officers monitor live video feeds.

Proponents of these private fundraising efforts say they have become indispensable in an era of tightening budgets, helping police to acquire the ever-more sophisticated tools needed to combat modern crime.

"There's very little discretionary money for the department," said Steve Soboroff, a businessman who is president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, the civilian board that oversees the LAPD's policies and operations. "A grant application to the foundation cuts all the red tape, or almost all of the red tape."

But critics say police foundations operate with little transparency or oversight and can be a way for wealthy donors and corporations to influence law enforcement agencies' priorities.

It's not uncommon for the same companies to be donors to the same police foundations that purchase their products for local police departments. Or for those companies also to be contractors for the same police agencies to which their products are being donated.

"No one really knows what's going on," said Dick Dadey of Citizens Union, a good government group in New York. "The public needs to know that these contributions are being made voluntarily and have no bearing on contracting decisions."

Palantir, the recipient of the Los Angeles Police Foundation's largesse in 2008, donated $10,000 to become a three-star sponsor of the group's annual "Above and Beyond" awards ceremony in 2013 and has made similar-sized gifts to the New York police foundation. The privately held Palo Alto firm, which had estimated revenues of $250 million in 2011 and is preparing to go public, also has won millions of dollars of contracts from the Los Angeles and New York police departments over the last three years.

Palantir officials did not respond to questions about its relationships with police departments and the foundations linked to them. The New York City Police Foundation did not answer questions about Palantir's donations, or its technology gifts to the NYPD.

Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, said she saw danger in the growing web of ties between police departments, foundations, and private donors.

"We run the risk of policy that is in the service of moneyed interests," she said.

First Foundation

The nation's first police foundation was established in New York City in 1971 by the Association for a Better New York, a private group headed by real estate magnate Lewis Rudin.

In the late 1970s, when violent crime soared and the city's finances were shaky, the foundation paid for bulletproof vests, which were distributed via a raffle. "It changed the administration into believing bulletproof vests are necessary equipment for the job," a former New York cop said.

Altogether, the New York City Police Foundation has distributed more than $120 million in grants since it was set up and has spurred a host of imitators.

One was the Los Angeles Police Foundation, which was founded in 1998 by then Police Chief Bernard Parks.

Its first, modest mission was to pay to outfit police units with medical kits to treat gunshot wounds. "There were incidents with officers injured and paramedics were getting there too late," said Parks, who is now a city councilman.

Over its lifespan, the foundation has provided the LAPD with grants totaling more than $20 million, much of it to acquire uncontroversial items such as bicycles and police dogs.

In New York and Los Angeles, it has long been true that top police officials have exercised considerable control over the use of foundation money.

Glassman said that the chief of police's office deals directly with the Los Angeles foundation, identifying which products and services the department wants and who the vendor should be. At Bratton's direction, private donations paid for a team of consultants to devise a plan to reorganize the LAPD.

According to press reports, Ray Kelly, New York's police commissioner for a brief stint in the early '90s and from 2002 to 2013, held similar sway with the New York City foundation. At his behest, foundation funds even paid for Kelly's membership at the Harvard Club, an NYPD spokesman confirmed.

More recently, though, the New York and Los Angeles foundations have turned to funding technology initiatives, many of them involving surveillance systems.

An audit included with the New York foundation's 2013 annual tax filing said almost half of the $6.5 million distributed by the group that year went to what it called the police department's "technology campaign."

The foundation was given $4.6 million by JPMorgan Chase to buy 1,000 laptops and security monitoring software for the police department's main data center, according to the foundation's tax documentation and press releases from JP Morgan.

Records for the Los Angeles foundation are more specific, showing outlays of almost $250,000 in 2010 for tracking equipment for the police department's counter-terrorism investigators and $460,000 in 2011 on surveillance cameras and license plate readers.

According to its 2012 tax filing, the foundation gave almost $25,000 to upgrade "Stingray" devices placed in skid row to monitor drug transactions.

Police boosters say there's no need for public debate over these types of acquisitions.

"I think we all see ourselves as part of a larger puzzle, which is making sure that Los Angeles has a world class police department, and we're just the private funding source," said Glassman of the Police Foundation. "The commission is an oversight board and the department is here to protect and serve."

But Peter Bibring of the ACLU of Southern California said that when police acquire new surveillance tools it can reshape their approach to policing 2013 shifts that, when enabled by private money, are occurring outside public view.

"These technologies are adopted without any kind of public discussion, without clear policies on how they should be used," he said.

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How To Install Virtualbox 4.3.16 On Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE And Derivatives | LinuxG.net

How To Install Virtualbox 4.3.16 On Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE And Derivatives | LinuxG.net | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Hello Linux Geeksters. As you may know, Virtualbox is an free , multi-platform virtualization software created by Oracle, being popular on Linux, Windows and Mac OS X. The latest version available is Virtualbox 4.3.16, which has been recently released, coming with important fixes and improvements. For information about this release, see the changelog.

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Free Software Foundation statement on the new iPhone, Apple Pay, and Apple Watch — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software

Jan Bergmans's insight:

It is astonishing to see so much of the technology press acting as Apple's marketing arm. What's on display today is widespread complicity in hiding the most newsworthy aspect of the announcement -- Apple's continuing war on individual computer user freedom, and by extension, free speech, free commerce, free association, privacy, and technological innovation.

 

Every review that does not mention Apple's insistence on using Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to lock down the devices and applications they sell is doing an extreme disservice to readers, and is a blow to the development of the free digital society we actually need. Any review that discusses technical specs without first exposing the unethical framework that produced those products, is helping usher people down a path that ends in complete digital disempowerment.

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Imagination Launches A MIPS Development Board

Imagination Launches A MIPS Development Board | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
To compete with the growing number of single-board development computers in the ARM space and even in the x86 space, Imagination Technologies has introduced their first public MIPS single-board computer for developers.
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Reiser4 Now Available For Linux 3.15

While the Linux 3.16 kernel is now stable, a few days ago the Reiser4 file-system was finally ported to Linux 3.15...
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Tell the FCC: Net Neutrality is crucial to free software — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software

Tell the FCC: Net Neutrality is crucial to free software — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

Net neutrality, the principle that all traffic on the Internet should be treated equally, should be a basic right for Internet users. It's also crucial for free software's continued growth and success. Here's why:

Media distribution giants that use Digital Restrictions Management and proprietary software to control what's on your computer have also been fighting for years to control the network. Without Net Neutrality, DRM-laden materials could be easier to access, while DRM-free competitors could be stuck in the slow lane. Web-based free software projects like GNU MediaGoblin could also suffer the slow treatment while competitors like YouTube shell out big bucks for speedier service. The bottom line--an Internet where the most powerful interests can pay for huge speed advantages could push smaller free software projects right off the map and make it harder for decentralized projects to flourish. That's not good for free software, and it's not good for other innovative voices for change in the digital world.

Tell the FCC: Net Neutrality will help free software flourish

Activists have worked for years to get to this moment. Over the last several months, things have really heated up--with Internet freedom lovers camping out outside of the FCC, serenading FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler with a special version "Which Side Are You On?" The comments flooding in to the agency have jammed the phones and crashed the FCC's email servers. And yet, Chairman Wheeler still thinks he can get away with ignoring overwhelming public outrage and wrecking the free Internet. We have to keep up our historic momentum in order to convince a cable-industry sympathizer like Chairman Wheeler to listen to the public and protect Net Neutrality.

The deadline for comments is July 15, 2014. Don't delay--comment now!

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Debian -- News -- Debian 7.0 "Wheezy" released

Debian -- News -- Debian 7.0 "Wheezy" released | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Jan Bergmans's insight:

With this broad selection of packages, Debian once again stays true to its goal of being the universal operating system. It is suitable for many different use cases: from desktop systems to netbooks; from development servers to cluster systems; and for database, web, or storage servers. At the same time, additional quality assurance efforts like automatic installation and upgrade tests for all packages in Debian's archive ensure that Wheezyfulfills the high expectations that users have of a stable Debian release. It is rock solid and rigorously tested.

You can install Debian on computers ranging from handheld systems to supercomputers, and on nearly everything in between. A total of nine architectures are supported: 32-bit PC / Intel IA-32 (i386), 64-bit PC / Intel EM64T / x86-64 (amd64), Motorola/IBM PowerPC (powerpc), Sun/Oracle SPARC (sparc), MIPS (mips (big-endian) and mipsel (little-endian)), Intel Itanium (ia64), IBM S/390 (31-bit s390 and 64-bit s390x), and ARM EABI (armel for older hardware and armhf for newer hardware using hardware floating-point).

Want to give it a try? 
If you want to simply try it without having to install it, you can use a special image, known as a live image, available for CDs, USB sticks, and netboot setups. Initially, these images are provided for the amd64 and i386architectures only. It is also possible to use these live images to install Debian. More information is available from the Debian Live homepage.

If, instead, you want to directly install it, you can choose among various installation media, such as Blu-ray Discs, DVDs, CDs, and USB sticks, or from the network. Several desktop environments — GNOME, KDE Plasma Desktop and Applications, Xfce, and LXDE — may be installed through CD images; the desired one may be chosen from the boot menus of the CDs/DVDs. In addition, multi-architecture CDs and DVDs are available which support installation of multiple architectures from a single disc. Or you can always create bootable USB installation media (see the Installation Guide for more details).

The installation images may be downloaded right now via bittorrent (the recommended method), jigdo, or HTTP; see Debian on CDs for further information. Wheezy will soon be available on physical DVD, CD-ROM, and Blu-ray Discs from numerous vendors, too.

Already a happy Debian user and you only want to upgrade? 
Upgrades to Debian 7.0 from the previous release, Debian 6.0 (codenamed Squeeze), are automatically handled by the apt-get package management tool for most configurations. As always, Debian systems may be upgraded painlessly, in place, without any forced downtime, but it is strongly recommended to read the release notes as well as the installation guide for possible issues, and for detailed instructions on installing and upgrading. The release notes will be further improved and translated to additional languages in the weeks after the release.

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Samsung will start selling a smartphone running on Tizen in the third quarter

Samsung will start selling a smartphone running on Tizen in the third quarter | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
Samsung Electronics said Monday that it would start selling a smartphone running on a homegrown operating system called Tizen in the third quarter of the year, marking a major step forward in the Korean technology giant's attempts to lessen its reliance on Google Inc.'s Android operating system.
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Open Source, Open Standards

The LiMo Foundation and Linux Foundation have recently announced a new partnership to develop a mobile operating system merging their LiMo and MeeGo platforms. Dubbed "Tizen," the new OS platform is a Linux-derived operating system not unlike Android, with which it plans to compete. However, Tizen will attempt to mitigate the copyright (and copyleft) issues that have been hounding Android, due to its use of certain copyrighted Linux libraries. Tizen will also focus on emerging open standards in delivering applications and content, particualrly HTML5.

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Tehnoetic wireless USB adapter now FSF-certified to respect your freedom — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software

Tehnoetic wireless USB adapter now FSF-certified to respect your freedom — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
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Software certification of the device focused primarily on the firmware for the Atheros AR9271 chip used on the adapter. This firmware is packaged in Linux-libre, the kernel used by several free GNU/Linux distributions. This is the same chipset used by the ThinkPenguin TPE-N150USB USB wireless adapter which was also awarded RYF certification in April 2013. While others may sell wireless USB adapters with this same chipset, if they do not bear the RYF certification mark, the device may be packaged with or recommend the use of nonfree software. This is why FSF endorsement of a hardware product is on a per seller basis rather than a blanket endorsement of a particular hardware model or chipset.

"The availability of freedom-respecting wireless networking devices is important because at present, the WiFi devices that ship with nearly all laptops and PCs require proprietary software. This is a major obstacle for users seeking to install a 100% free software GNU/Linux distro, because for most people, WiFi is an essential feature. So, it is exciting that we can now direct any such user from around the globe to two different sellers on two different continents that offer a small and convenient USB WiFi adapter," stated Joshua Gay, FSF Licensing & Compliance Manager.

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KDE and Qt News: KDE Frameworks 5, Plasma Next, Qt Creator 3.1, KDE Commits

KDE and Qt News: KDE Frameworks 5, Plasma Next, Qt Creator 3.1, KDE Commits | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
KDE Frameworks 5
KDE Frameworks 5 Beta 1 Officially Released
The KDE Community has announced that KDE Frameworks 5 Beta 1 has been released, marking yet another step towards the end of the old KDE Platform 4.
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$2,400 “Introduction to Linux” course will be free and online this summer

$2,400 “Introduction to Linux” course will be free and online this summer | Linux A Future | Scoop.it
The Linux Foundation is putting its training materials up on edX's platform.
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 $2,400 “Introduction to Linux” course will be free and online this summerThe Linux Foundation is putting its training materials up on edX's platform.

by Megan Geuss - Mar 8 2014, 10:00pm CET

Operating Systems83mtellin

Earlier this week, The Linux Foundation announced that it would be working with edX, a non-profit online learning site governed by Harvard and MIT, to make its “Introduction to Linux” course free and open to all.

The Linux Foundation has long offered a wide variety of training courses through its website, but those can generally cost upwards of $2,000. This introductory class, which usually costs $2,400, will be the first from the Linux Foundation to run as a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). There is no limit on enrollment through edX's platform.

The course will be held this summer, although an official start date has not been posted yet. Jennifer Cloer, Director of Communications for the Linux Foundation, said that over 2,500 people signed up for the course within the first 24 hours of it being posted. There are no prerequisites, and a note on the course's information page says that most users will find the course takes between 40 and 60 hours to complete.

Students can either audit the course, which means they'd get access to all the course materials but not have to commit to completing the tests and assignments, or they can take the course for a certificate of completion, which will be offered for free. (On some edX classes, "verified certificates of achievement" cost a fee.)

If all goes smoothly, the Linux Foundation may consider making more courses available on edX in the future.

In the press release from the Linux Foundation, executive director Jim Zemlin wrote, “Our mission is to advance Linux and that includes ensuring we have a talent pool of Linux professionals. To widen that talent pool and give more people access to the opportunities in the Linux community and IT industry, we are making our training program more accessible to users worldwide.”

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