Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP
13.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP
Links that may be helpful in PYP Units of Inquiry
Curated by Petra Pollum
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Petra Pollum from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Teaching with Content Curation

Teaching with Content Curation | Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP | Scoop.it
Content curation is the process of collecting, organizing and displaying information relevant to a particular topic. Teacher content curation can be used by students and students can be asked to sh...

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Curation

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/learn-every-day-a-bit-with-curation/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/learning-to-become-a-good-digital-citizen-digital-citizenship/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 


Via Dan Kirsch, Gust MEES
more...
Jocelyn Bassett's curator insight, April 2, 2015 10:50 PM

Digital curation includes the up-keeping, safeguarding and enhancing of digital data throughout its duration.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, May 28, 2015 5:34 PM

La curation est aussi utilisable au cours !

Edgar Mata's curator insight, June 2, 2015 8:16 AM

"La curación de contenidos es el proceso de recolectar, organizar y mostrar información relevante acerca de un tema en particular. Los contenidos curados por el profesor pueden ser empleados por los estudiantes para aprender."

Rescooped by Petra Pollum from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Bad Guys Are Watching You (via insecure Wi-Fi)

Bad Guys Are Watching You (via insecure Wi-Fi) | Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP | Scoop.it
Our study during World Cup indicates one in four networks are dangerous and you must take care to avoid substantial loss.

 

Recent developments in the smartphone world and the emergence of mobile apps for almost every use inevitably led to increased smartphone and tablet usage when dealing with sensitive data.


Be it your CV on LinkedIn, private pictures sent to your lover via WhatsApp, Viber or other similar app, one-time password for online banking – you send and receive such data on your mobile device.


Unfortunately, most people don’t realize how often and how easily that data, which you would never trust to most people around you, could be intercepted by a complete stranger seated ten meters away.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/dangers-of-wifi-in-public-places/

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, June 17, 2014 7:27 PM

Be it your CV on LinkedIn, private pictures sent to your lover via WhatsApp, Viber or other similar app, one-time password for online banking – you send and receive such data on your mobile device.


Unfortunately, most people don’t realize how often and how easily that data, which you would never trust to most people around you, could be intercepted by a complete stranger seated ten meters away.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/dangers-of-wifi-in-public-places/


RESENTICE's curator insight, June 19, 2014 5:28 AM

Quelques recommandations pour utiliser le WiFi en toute sécurité

Rescooped by Petra Pollum from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Reflection for Resilience

Reflection for Resilience | Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP | Scoop.it

 

Resiliency is about handling stress, uncertainty and setbacks well — in other words, maintaining equilibrium under pressure.

 

And in our modern lives, whether we are at school, at work, or at home, there is no shortage of pressure.

 

Maintaining our equilibrium is something, it seems, we all need these days.

 

There is something you can do — everyday if you would like — to help build your resilience, your capacity to weather stressful events.

 

It's journalling.

 

Keeping a journal can foster resiliency.

 

CCL recommends using "learning journals" or "reflection journals" as tools for gaining insight into your leadership experiences.

 

The process of writing and reflection builds self-awareness, encourages learning and opens the door to adaptability.

 

The form and content of your journal is a matter of individual choice. However, when you do sit down to make a journal entry about an experience that has challenged your equilibrium, we recommend it have three parts:

 

 

✤ The event or experience.

Describe what occurred as objectively as possible.

Don't use judgmental language.

Stick to the facts.

What happened?

Who was involved?

When did it happen?

Where did it happen?

 

 

✤ Your reaction.

Describe your reaction to the event as factually and objectively as possible.

What did you want to do in response to the event?

What did you actually do?

What were your thoughts?

What were your feelings?

 

 

✤ The lessons.

Think about the experience and your reaction to it.

What did you learn from the event and from your reaction to it?

Did the event suggest a development need you should address?

Do you see a pattern in your reactions?

Did you react differently than in the past during similar experiences and does that suggest you are making progress or backsliding on a valuable leadership competency?

 

 

So remember, capture the event or experience in objective language, describe your reaction, then note the lessons you might get from it.

 

CCL uses journaling as part of almost all our leadership development program experiences and we emphasize with our participants that learning doesn't come from the "doing" but in the "reflecting on the doing."

 

 

>> Source:

http://bit.ly/kbIo6U

 

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/1ep79Ah

 


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr, Christine Heine, Gust MEES
more...
Ness Crouch's curator insight, January 14, 2014 10:37 PM

This is a great article.

Mhd.Shadi Khudr's comment, January 15, 2014 11:58 AM
All the very best to Ness and all
Roger Sommerville's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:44 AM

I find it hard to spend the time on making a journal work. I suspect it is because I have not thought about resilience and reaction to situations. The short lists here provide a useful guide - and by focusing on my reaction I can give my self a chance to use demanding events/situations more productively. 

Rescooped by Petra Pollum from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Edmodo Resources for Teachers A Comprehensive Chart ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Edmodo Resources for Teachers A Comprehensive Chart ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP | Scoop.it

Check it out!


Via Gust MEES
more...
Rescooped by Petra Pollum from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Awkward 'Privacy Talk' Parents Should Have With Their Kids

The Awkward 'Privacy Talk' Parents Should Have With Their Kids | Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP | Scoop.it
Parents across the world today need to have a new conversation with their kids. No, it’s not about behaving in class, not talking to strangers, or having sex. But in so many ways, it's just as important. It’s data permanence. How we can preserve our reputations in the digital era?

 

It’s a conversation that will look very different in different parts of the world. In some places, kids will have to think twice before posting photos of teenage escapades, given how such photos may look to others in a professional environment even many years later. In other places, kids will have to be careful of posting any items that may “dishonor” them or their family in some way.


In still other places, kids will have to think about whether what they post on sensitive political, ethnic, or religious issues may define them long after they have changed their views.



Via Gust MEES
more...
Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 5, 2014 9:05 AM

We have been having these types of important discussions with our students in digital literacy classes. What is interesting to note is that it becomes a parent piece that often schools have to provide to help them keep up with their children and  the good, bad and the ugly of technology.

 

Noeline Laccetti's curator insight, March 5, 2014 9:47 AM

Data permanence must be addressed with ALL children, and well before the "sex talk" 

Jenny Ritchie's curator insight, March 5, 2014 7:36 PM

New technologies have exposed behaviours of young people which have put their future success at risk.  Are these new behaviours created by the opportunities that are provided by new technology?  Or are these behaviours that would have been typical of young people even without the technologies they use as a vehicle to display them?

Rescooped by Petra Pollum from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

50 Awesome Facts About Earth To Share With Your Class [Infographic]

50 Awesome Facts About Earth To Share With Your Class [Infographic] | Links for Units of Inquiry in PYP | Scoop.it
I bet you don't know the vast majority of these facts about Earth. I sure didn't and thought I was on my game. Guess not!

Via Gust MEES
more...
Diana Turner's curator insight, August 18, 2013 4:57 PM

Geography factoids to stimulate academic reading and conversation in an intermediate ESL class.

Jacqui Sharp's curator insight, August 18, 2013 5:13 PM

I like how the information in this infographic is broken up into parts Space, Atmosphere, Sea, underearth and ground. It has lots of statistics that are backed up by sources.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 19, 2013 4:13 PM

Love this! I will share this one with my class