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Grand Hotels of Egypt by Andrew Humphreys | Martin Kramer

Grand Hotels of Egypt by Andrew Humphreys | Martin Kramer | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

A splendid project: “This book tells the stories of Egypt’s grand hotels and some of the people that stayed in them, from pioneering voyagers such as Florence Nightingale to later visitors including Agatha Christie, Churchill and T.E. Lawrence.” Author Andrew Humphreys has put together a riveting site: http://goo.gl/Yjq1i and blog: http://goo.gl/C8Bip. The hotels are long gone—but not the Winter Palace!

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'Israel’s creation worst catastrophe to hit world' [says head of Egypt Muslim Brotherhood] by Oren Kessler

'Israel’s creation worst catastrophe to hit world' [says head of Egypt Muslim Brotherhood] by Oren Kessler | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

The head of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood has called on Arab forces to confront Israel and for the international community to pressure the “Zionist government to withdraw from the land of Palestine.”

 

• 'Israel’s creation worst catastrophe to hit world' [says head of Egypt Muslim Brotherhood] by Oren Kessler http://t.co/EGsqlCAz

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Shafiq or bust by Uri Heitner

Every sane and enlightened person in the world is hoping for a Shafiq victory, because the alternative is no Egyptian Lech Walesa, Vaclav Havel or Nelson Mandela. Egyptians face a choice between a Mubarak associate and a Muslim Brotherhood candidate.

 

• Shafiq or bust by Uri Heitner http://t.co/jR316Kkw

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Disorganised moderates may gift Egypt to Islamists by Linda Heard

Disorganised moderates may gift Egypt to Islamists by Linda Heard | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

Moderates, liberals, modernists and Copts have little more than two weeks to get their act together. They cannot afford to sit at home or in cafes watching queues lengthen outside polling stations. They must quit complaining and vote with their feet. Mousa and Sabahi should rally their respective bases to bless Shafiq; that’s if they’re willing to put their country and its people above personal rivalry and ambition.

 

• Disorganised moderates may gift Egypt to Islamists by Linda Heard http://t.co/F647N9QQ

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Morsi Not Moussa?!?!?!?! by Steven A. Cook

Morsi Not Moussa?!?!?!?! by Steven A. Cook | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

The fact that so many well-informed observers were “wide-right” on the elections speaks to the perils of prediction. The important thing now is for those analysts who got it wrong not to over-correct. I stand by my claim that the Brothers will have a hard time imposing their will on Egypt. The demonstrations in Tahrir on Monday and today against Morsi (and Shafiq) are a clear indication that even if the Brothers assume the chair, running Egypt is not going to be easy.

 

• Morsi Not Moussa?!?!?!?! by Steven A. Cook http://t.co/45kPoJBJ

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Our fatal attraction to democracy by George Jonas

Much as we like democracy and eager as we are to export it, we’ll have to start considering that democracy may not be our friend. More precisely, it may not be our friend abroad. Specifically, it may not be our friend in Pakistan, or in Egypt.

 

• Our fatal attraction to democracy by George Jonas http://t.co/4ckI7qXi

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Egypt's Next Leader Won't Be A Creature of Tahrir Square by Fouad Ajami

Egypt's Next Leader Won't Be A Creature of Tahrir Square by Fouad Ajami | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

A new republic has emerged, born in Tahrir Square. Two contenders for the presidency of the republic are not creatures of that square. But this is not the first time that the fruits of a revolution were picked by those who were strangers to its exertions.

 

• Egypt's Next Leader Won't Be A Creature of Tahrir Square by Fouad Ajami http://t.co/v4uC0kMG

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Two Faces of the Muslim Brotherhood by Alexander Smoltczyk

Two Faces of the Muslim Brotherhood by Alexander Smoltczyk | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood is the strongest political force in Egypt, which is holding presidential elections this week, yet opinions are divided over the nature of the movement and what it really wants.

 

• Two Faces of the Muslim Brotherhood by Alexander Smoltczyk http://bit.ly/JqjjZE

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Kramer on FB: Muslim Brotherhood tells us what it really thinks (about Israel)

Anyone who doesn’t see a looming clash between a Muslim Brotherhood-led Egypt and Israel is wearing blinders and earplugs. This is an election rally for the MB’s presidential candidate, Muhammad Mursi. It’s an anti-Israel hate fest. (Transcript: http://bit.ly/KCoqKY.) On Sunday, I heard Deputy National Security Adviser Denis McDonough sugarcoat the chaos in Egypt. He’s either disingenuous or a fool.

 

• Kramer on FB: Muslim Brotherhood tells us what it really thinks (about Israel) http://t.co/naPznK5g

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The American Media Gets An Egyptian Presidential Candidate All Wrong by Eric Trager

The American Media Gets An Egyptian Presidential Candidate All Wrong by Eric Trager | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

Abouel Fotouh’s exit from the Muslim Brotherhood hardly implies his moderation, and he has continued to embrace the Brotherhood’s core aim of establishing a sharia-based legal system. In this vein, his presidential platform calls for “the application of sharia law as a comprehensive concept for achieving the fundamental interests of the people.” If Abouel Fotouh is elected, he is liable to create a host of challenges for the United States, as well as for many Egyptians. Downplaying those challenges by pretending a longtime Islamist is actually a progressive liberal will do absolutely nothing to solve them.

 

• The American Media Gets An Egyptian Presidential Candidate All Wrong by Eric Trager http://bit.ly/IGL18U

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Meet The Islamist Political Fixer Who Could Be Egypt’s Next President by Eric Trager

Meet The Islamist Political Fixer Who Could Be Egypt’s Next President by Eric Trager | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

Morsi’s emergence as the Brotherhood’s standard-bearer should be taken as an indicator of the organization’s modus operandi. It is internally dictatorial, ideologically intolerant, and—perhaps most importantly—only willing to embrace political gradualism when pressured by stronger authorities.

 

• Meet The Islamist Political Fixer Who Could Be Egypt’s Next President by Eric Trager http://bit.ly/I9ZNyS

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No Brothers in Arms in Egypt by Eric Trager

No Brothers in Arms in Egypt by Eric Trager | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

The disqualification of ten candidates from Egypt's presidential race, including the Muslim Brotherhood nominee, has convinced the Brotherhood that the military is conspiring against it to win the election. The Brotherhood’s fight for Egypt’s future -- and its attempts to delegitimize those institutions that it does not control -- will likely continue well beyond the elections this May.

 

• No Brothers in Arms in Egypt by Eric Trager http://fam.ag/I1AJ0D

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Sympathy for the Leftist Devil by David P. Goldman [Spengler]

Sympathy for the Leftist Devil by David P. Goldman [Spengler] | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

It can’t be good to be a pro-Palestinian activist these days. No one has time to worry about the Palestinians. Bashar al-Assad continues to slaughter his own people — nearly 10,000 over the past year — and the Muslim Brotherhood leaders of the Syrian opposition undoubtedly would slaughter Assad’s Alawite coreligionists were they to take power. There are at least 2,000 dead and 22,000 injured in little Yemen during the past two years. All of this pales next to what is likely to come in Egypt, as the military and the Islamists fight for power.

 

• Sympathy for the Leftist Devil by David P. Goldman [Spengler] http://bit.ly/HQNnkd

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Why liberals got it wrong and Islamists obliged [in Egypt] by Rahim Elkishkya

Liberals took to arguing dismissively that Egyptians had voted for the Brotherhood out of anti-regime sentiments and, besides, there was no alternative to the Brotherhood for the moment. This argument has been shown to be a misguided oversimplification, at best, as Egypt prepares to play host to the Islamists' biggest conquest to date.

 

• Why liberals got it wrong and Islamists obliged [in Egypt] by Rahim Elkishkya http://t.co/9kTWVAcV

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US Policy and Egypt's Presidential Runoff: Projecting Clarity, Not Disinterest by Robert Satloff

US Policy and Egypt's Presidential Runoff: Projecting Clarity, Not Disinterest by Robert Satloff | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

To bolster the integrity of Egypt's democratic process and preserve America's own national interests, Washington should make clear how the outcome of the presidential runoff could affect U.S.-Egyptian relations.

 

• US Policy and Egypt's Presidential Runoff: Projecting Clarity, Not Disinterest by Robert Satloff http://t.co/TP3HFU38

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Egypt: Europe’s Economic Cousin by Michael Tanner

Egypt: Europe’s Economic Cousin by Michael Tanner | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

Much of the attention, both within Egypt and in the outside world, is being focused on issues such as the role of political Islam, crime, political openness, and the rivalry between the military and the Muslim Brotherhood. Yet there has been relatively little discussion of the issue that may ultimately have the most long-lasting impact on Egypt’s future — the need for economic reform.

 

• Egypt: Europe’s Economic Cousin by Michael Tanner http://t.co/WTUCobWT

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Egypt now stuck between army and Islamists by George Friedman

The military regime, whatever its defects, is a known bulwark against the Muslim Brotherhood. The old order is attractive to many because it is known; what the Muslim Brotherhood will become is not known and is frightening to those committed to secularism. They would rather live under the old regime.

 

• Egypt now stuck between army and Islamists by George Friedman http://t.co/xvhyI7PP

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Mapping the Egyptian presidential election by Eric Schewe

Mapping the Egyptian presidential election by Eric Schewe | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

While voting behavior and personal identity are particularly scrambled for Egyptians living through a chaotic transition from an authoritarian state, the maps I drew up while waiting for the results to come out yesterday show distinct geographical variations. 

 

• Mapping the Egyptian presidential election by Eric Schewe http://t.co/9nIeyyTl

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The Facebook Caliphate by Mark Steyn

Since the founding of the Kingdom of Egypt in 1922, the country has spent the last nine decades getting worse. Mubarak’s kleptocracy was worse than Farouk’s ramshackle kingdom, and the new Egypt will be worse still.

 

• The Facebook Caliphate by Mark Steyn http://t.co/ovl2OnZz

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Sleepless in Jerusalem [over Egypt] by Oren Kessler

Sleepless in Jerusalem [over Egypt] by Oren Kessler | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

For many in Israel, the view across the border could hardly be bleaker. "It's hard to know whether we should talk about Egypt-Israel relations or the absence thereof," said former ambassador Mazel. "Whomever is elected president, the feeling is whatever comes next won't be good."

 

• Sleepless in Jerusalem [over Egypt] by Oren Kessler http://t.co/QqBPJAZa

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Presidential Elections Will Not End Egyptian Instability by Eric Trager

Presidential Elections Will Not End Egyptian Instability by Eric Trager | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

Even if this week's voting is fair and credible, the election is unlikely to restore political stability. For starters, the new president's powers will remain ill defined in the absence of a new constitution, and he will struggle for authority against the Islamist-dominated parliament and the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. Meanwhile, even if a military figure such as Shafiq is elected, there is no mechanism forcing the SCAF to answer to him. The military may therefore remain autonomous for the foreseeable future, intervening in politics whenever it fears that its narrow interests are threatened.

 

• Presidential Elections Will Not End Egyptian Instability by Eric Trager http://bit.ly/K9li7f

 

 

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The Wages of the Sinai by Steven A. Cook

The Wages of the Sinai by Steven A. Cook | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

The Egyptians have no capacity to plan and execute a sustained military effort in the Sinai that would improve the security environment there. As a result, Israeli leaders have clearly determined that if the next rocket to land on Eilat kills someone, they are going to have to deal with the problem themselves. The Israelis have every right to defend themselves, but an Israeli attack on Egypt soil would not end well for anyone. I guarantee it. The United States needs to get down to business and help Egypt clean up the Sinai. The Egyptians may be resistant and slow to alter their war fighting doctrine, but it’s in their long-terms interests to stabilize the Sinai.

 

• The Wages of the Sinai by Steven A. Cook http://on.cfr.org/Jh7IvI

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The horror and the pita [in Egypt] by Spengler [David P. Goldman]

In effect, the Muslim Brotherhood has chosen to push the country towards chaos. Interdicting the Brotherhood requires an uncharacteristic harshness on the part of American policy. War correspondent Peter Arnett might have concocted the notorious statement, "It became necessary to destroy the town to save it," supposedly said by an American officer of the Vietnamese provincial capital Ben Tre in 1968. Something like that might be the outcome for Egypt.

 

• The horror and the pita [in Egypt] by Spengler [David P. Goldman] http://bit.ly/Jv2DRc

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Egypt’s Shameful Election Bans May Save Its Democracy by Noah Feldman

Egypt’s Shameful Election Bans May Save Its Democracy by Noah Feldman | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

Whoever becomes president will be someone who got the job more or less through the manipulations of the electoral commission. He (the other main players are all male) will not represent one of the leading political parties, which means he will lack the political backing to challenge the military and will have to try to govern in concert with Parliament. A weak president is not necessarily a bad thing for a new democracy coming out of 60 years of dictatorship. Learning to make public, accountable deals is the essence of successful democratic politics. The new president will have to learn to do this. Then again, so will all Egyptians.

 

• Egypt’s Shameful Election Bans May Save Its Democracy by Noah Feldman http://bloom.bg/Ib4WHj

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Egypt: Pity the Winner by Elliott Abrams

Egypt: Pity the Winner by Elliott Abrams | Martin Kramer on the Middle East | Scoop.it

Those who oppose the Islamists must be wondering whether an Islamist victory in the presidential election, as well, might be advantageous in one way: If they are given full responsibility for the government and the economy, that sets up more liberal and secular forces to ask the local version of Ronald Reagan’s question when the next elections are held, five years from now: “Are you better off now than you were five years ago?” But of course, that won’t work unless there actually are free elections five years from now, and at this stage it isn’t even clear if and when a new constitution will be written — much less what it will say.

 

• Egypt: Pity the Winner by Elliott Abrams http://bit.ly/HXiWJR

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