ENES1: Features and Places in the Immediate Environment
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Built and Natural Environments

A clip to help students understand the difference between built and natural environments. ES1 loved it!

Via jkee1851
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jkee1851's curator insight, April 23, 2013 1:13 AM

This resource is a great way to introduce students to the idea of natural and built features and provide a reference point for students to start identifying the natural and built features in their own immediate environments. The video contains some images of landmarks from around Sydney that students will recognise as well as images from around the world of all different types of natural and built and features.


During the video, the teacher can stop on chosen images and get students to discuss and suggest reasons why that feature can be classified as either built or natural environment.  The main teaching idea is to get student to identify what elements they are using to determine whether it is a natural or built feature. Then in pairs give students a number of images which together they will need to sort into built and natural by discussing the features they see in each image. The task can also be used as a goal indicator for students, stating that by the end of this topic you will be able to identify different natural and built features of the environment around you (Principle of Assessment For Learning).


To assess student understanding get students to complete the sentence “A natural environment I know is… “ and “A built environment I know is…” as well as drawing an image to represent these two chosen environment from their experiences. This aligns with the Literacy Continuum where Early Stage 1 students are expected to at cluster 3 or middle of the year, write a recognisable sentence.  For extra scaffolding the sentence can be completed on the board with the students that need the support and they can then go and copy this sentence. For students who need extension have them complete another sentence describing the natural and built environment. (Linking to cluster 4 on the Literacy Continuum.)

Luke Hayward's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:44 PM

This resource is a great way to introduce students to the idea of natural and built features and provide a reference point for students to start identifying the natural and built features in their own immediate environments. The video contains some images of landmarks from around Sydney that students will recognise as well as images from around the world of all different types of natural and built and features.

 

During the video, the teacher can stop on chosen images and get students to discuss and suggest reasons why that feature can be classified as either built or natural environment.  The main teaching idea is to get student to identify what elements they are using to determine whether it is a natural or built feature. Then in pairs give students a number of images which together they will need to sort into built and natural by discussing the features they see in each image. The task can also be used as a goal indicator for students, stating that by the end of this topic you will be able to identify different natural and built features of the environment around you (Principle of Assessment For Learning).

 

To assess student understanding get students to complete the sentence “A natural environment I know is… “ and “A built environment I know is…” as well as drawing an image to represent these two chosen environment from their experiences. This aligns with the Literacy Continuum where Early Stage 1 students are expected to at cluster 3 or middle of the year, write a recognisable sentence.  For extra scaffolding the sentence can be completed on the board with the students that need the support and they can then go and copy this sentence. For students who need extension have them complete another sentence describing the natural and built environment. (Linking to cluster 4 on the Literacy Continuum.)