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Describes the characteristics of an ecosystem on Earth's surface

Describes the characteristics of an ecosystem on Earth's surface | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The incredible fractal pattern rivers (now dried out) were made as they spread into the salt flats of the arid Baja California Desert in Mexico."


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Describes drainage patterns in Baja California in Mexico.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:22 PM

This picture shows the drainage patterns and how the water drifted in many directions and not just in a single line. Water does not stay in a perfect straight line it flows and drifts in many directions. This is what the image is showing, how this particular water flows in many directions and branches off from one stream to another. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:46 AM

The Earth is an incredible place, we all know that. To see something like this form by itself is a wonder on its own.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:15 PM

The photographs of the salt flats in the Baja California Desert reveal dried out rivers that may have once fertilized the area to be able to sustain life.

Human-Environment Interaction speeds up desertification and makes once fertile lands useless.

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Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, however, the pumpkin is nearly exclusively considered a food crop or animal feed."


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:02 AM

Every year it is expected around halloween that my family and friends will carve pumpkins. Then around chrstmas time it is expected that we will get our christmas tree to decorate. This is something lots of people do around this time. However what I never really linked together was that I was thinking about the geography of things by doing this. I know it is part of our culture and most people do it because it was a tradition. However what I never really thought about was where these pumpkins or christmas trees actually came from. There is a process that farmers have to go through to produce pumkins and pine trees, a process we probably don't even think about because we are so used to having these things around the holidays. When we think of pumpkins we thing of Jack-o-laters and pumkin pies, but to some people pumpkins are considered a crop and food source. We may not see it that way because our culture uses them around Halloween and for processed canned pumpkin for cooking. However not all cultures are like that, which is interesting to think about. Something that is considered seasonal in our culture might be an everyday crop for another culture. It is interesting to see how different places in the wolrd use such things as pumpkin so much different that we do in our culture.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:25 PM

I have been a long-time fan of pumpkin coffee, and tomorrow I will probably have some with my cousins and family... Some areas of Asia allow consumption of dogs, other areas of the US allow consumption of roadkill, and that is different from what most people in RI are used to... So I guess, it's not really my business what other people and countries do with their pumpkin crops, as long as it doesn't negatively affect other people.  My neighbor has won some prizes, I think 3rd place in RI for largest pumpkin contests, which is pretty cool, because for several months, you can see their pumpkin garden from my backyard.  Those pumpkins are enormous, and made me wonder if there was anything being done to make the modified pumpkins more usable in food.  I know GMOs are a touchy issue, but to feed the starving people around the world, you have to wonder if one pumpkin at 2000 lbs could feed a village of people.  Lots of people that don't like GMOs probably do unhealthy things in other ways, so their huge activism movements really boggle me.  Labeling GMOs is one thing, but stopping genetic modifications seems as controversial as starting them, especially when some people can benefit from them.  Whatever, I guess pumpkins are cool for whatever people want to do with them, including smashing them... this week on RIC's campus I saw a smashed pumpkin.  The only thing that really popped into my head was not "what a waste," or "oh, those delinquents," but rather "that seems fun."  I did assume though, that no one was hurt by the smashing of the pumpkin...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 5:14 PM

Although you wouldn't think it there are many different countries and specific regions that demonstrate the perfect cropping land and fertilization process to grow pumpkins. Out of the US power house pumpkin growing Illinois is named number 1. Along side California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvainnia, Mississippi. But lets travel abroad to Africa, now me personally I wouldnt think that there are alot of pumpkin patches in Africa but there are many different places in Africa that pumpkins are grown. SOme of these places are Egypt with (690,000) and then there is South Africa with (378,776). I found these numbers quite interesting because one wouldn't think that there are pumpkin patches in Africa.

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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2:47 PM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:25 AM

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

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Describes how people adapt differently to different physical environments

Describes how people adapt differently to different physical environments | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
California Irrigation Changing Weather Patterns in American Southwest - ScienceNOW

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Adaptations due to climate change in Southwest and California vary.

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Shows the way land is used differently in a city or town

Shows the way land is used differently in a city or town | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

" A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution)."

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Land use is different around Mississippi River basin.

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Taki Toto's comment, August 10, 2013 11:48 AM
taki
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:20 AM

INland water environments

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:28 PM

The Mississippi River flows down the east side of the United States. Since the river is so long it has many streams that expand off it it as well. As you can see in the picture the red parts are the sections where the water has branched off the Mississippi River. It takes up almost all of the middle section of the United States. 

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Includes a description of a place written in vivid language

A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Middle East

~ Dilip Hiro (author) More about this product
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"In this up-to-date, painstakingly researched dictionary, author Dilip Hiro brings one of the most tumultuous regions of the world to our fingertips. It is easy-to-read, simple to use, authoritative, and comprehensive. If offers a wide range of alphabetically arranged information on topics ranging from current affairs, history and politics to religions, literature and tourist destinations.

 

Topics covered include: Arab Spring, Arab-Israeli Wars, Biographies, Christianity and Christian Sects, Civil Wars, Country Profiles, Ethnic Groups, Government, Gulf Wars, Historical Places, History, Hostages, International Agreements and Treaties, Islam and Islamic Sects, Judaism and Jewish Sects, Languages, Literary Personalities, Military and Military Leaders, Nonconventional and ..."


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Middle East is described in vivid detail & language.

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Describes how the introduction of a new technology is changing culture

Describes how the introduction of a new technology is changing culture | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

With Google’s promise last year to wire homes, schools, libraries and other public institutions in this city with the nation’s fastest Internet connection, community leaders on the long forlorn, predominantly black east side were excited, seeing a potentially uplifting force. They anticipated new educational opportunities for their children and an incentive for developers to build in their communities.

 

But in July, Google announced a process in which only those areas where enough residents preregistered and paid a $10 deposit would get the service, Google Fiber. While nearly all of the affluent, mostly white neighborhoods here quickly got enough registrants, a broad swath of black communities lagged. The deadline to sign up was midnight Sunday.

 

The specter that many blacks in this city might not get access to this technology has inflamed the long racial divide here, stoking concern that it could deepen.

 

“This is just one more example of people that are lower income, sometimes not higher educated people, being left behind,” said Margaret May, the executive director of the neighborhood council in Ivanhoe, where the poverty rate was more than 46 percent in 2009. “It makes me very sad.”

 

For generations, Kansas City has been riven by racial segregation that can still be seen, with a majority of blacks in the urban core confined to neighborhoods in the east. Troost Avenue has long been considered the dividing line, the result of both overt and secretive efforts to keep blacks out of white schools and housing areas and of historical patterns of population growth and settlement, said Micah Kubic, with the nonprofit Greater Kansas City Local Initiatives Support Corporation.

 

Nearly three in four people living east of Troost in Kansas City’s urban center are black, according to an analysis of 2010 Census data by Andrew Beveridge, a sociology professor at Queens College in New York City.

 

Click headline to read more--


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Google Internet Drive is changing culture in Kansas City

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Describes a challenge related to human migration

Describes a challenge related to human migration | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
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Challenges of refugee migrants across the world

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Briley Angle's comment, September 16, 2013 9:58 PM
* chance *
Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:34 PM

A map that details the countries with the highest count of refugees. This map shows the patterns of immigrants and possible areas that would be prone to conflict and refugees. 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 11:55 AM

This shows us how people have been pushed away from various places around the world and congregated to form large communities in other areas.

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Discusses a landform that was shaped by physical processes, such as the water or erosion cycles

Discusses a landform that was shaped by physical processes, such as the water or erosion cycles | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Up to 100 feet of shoreline will disappear around the state if sea level rises just 1 foot.

Via Russell Roberts
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Erosion in Hawaii

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, August 31, 2013 10:51 AM

This theory could explain why much of Hawaii's extensive beaches are disappearing.  For the past two decades, restoration efforts have been trying to replace sand at Waikiki Beach.  So far, those efforts have kept pace with the rise in sea levels.  The situation is critical in some areas of the South Pacific where low-lying atolls may disappear in our lifetime.  Some nations, such as Tuvalu, are in great danger of being inundated.  Aloha, Russ.

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:59 PM

Unit 1 - Coastal erosion

Kapo Trading Company's curator insight, September 2, 2013 1:46 PM

Maybe you property will be beach front soon...

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Explains why a human settlement is where it is

Explains why a human settlement is where it is | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
It's much easier for refugees from the region to settle in Europe than in the U.S.

Via Jane Ellingson
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Or, in this case, where it isn't.

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Gives an example of how human actions modify the physical environment

Gives an example of how human actions modify the physical environment | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Climate change, mining and pollution are three of the biggest threats to the Sami people, who inhabit parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia.

Via dilaycock, FCHSAPGEO
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Human-induced climate change, mining and pollution are modifying the Sami people's regions in Scandinavia.

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Shows how culture shapes a group's way of life and its own view of itself and other groups

Shows how culture shapes a group's way of life and its own view of itself and other groups | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.

Via Seth Dixon, Trisha Klancar, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Ethnicity and culture are correlated, and clearly if a geographic region contains many of these, their views of each other will be shaped by various political or military actions.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 6:19 PM

This map shows tha tthere are an overwhelimg amount of Arabs especially in centeral Syria. And then on the coast lline it is mostly mixed with pink representing the overwhlming other majority.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 8:11 PM

It appears from this article that Syria is a complicated country. The map shows the different ethnic and religious groups of Syria, along with other groups, all of which live within a small area. Syria, along with other countries within the Middle East have been faced with one serious issue or another. Many different people live within a very small area; those people practice different religions and are ethnically and culturally different. Unfortunately, being different in this part of the world may get you killed.   

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 1:25 PM

Maps such as this one are very valuable when trying to understand conflict.  In Syria and the greater Levant area, unbalanced power and representation in politics is the result of many different religious and ethnic groups living in such close proximity each other, allowing conflict to become very invasive.

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Discusses a renewable or nonrenewable resource people use

Discusses a renewable or nonrenewable resource people use | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The country prepares to take to the global stage with a much-needed energy project, but locals are less than thrilled with the crowding and chaos that comes with it.

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Involves hydroelectric power.

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Describes the human or physical characteristics that define a region

Describes the human or physical characteristics that define a region | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A new study claims that mountains may have influenced a special class of sounds occurring in almost all of the languages of the Caucasus.

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Linguistic correlation to terrain.

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"Lost" New England Revealed

"Lost" New England Revealed | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"New England's woody hills and dales hide a secret—they weren't always forested. Instead, many were once covered with colonial roads and farmsteads."


Via Seth Dixon
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 8, 10:55 AM

Through the most recent technology, man has been able to discover that wooded areas of New England where once vibrant communities, homesteads and settled communities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 26, 10:44 PM

Thanks to dedicated archeologists and the LiDAR, we can see the creations of a once small, abandoned community in New England. Even through the thick forest, the LiDAR can detect rocks walls and small dirt roads. Hopefully, we can find more of these ancient communities in other areas around the world.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 12:48 PM

History is revealed with the use of high tech scanners known as  LiDAR's. With the use of these scanners, scholars learn that many areas of New England, including forested areas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, once were farming grounds. These "lost" pieces of history now lead scholars in new directions in dicovering the past, and details to its future.

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Refugees from Syria

Refugees from Syria | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The number of Syrian refugees who have fled the conflict and crossed the borders hasn't ceased to increase.

Via Seth Dixon
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The ongoing military conflicts in Syria have caused a significant refugee problem. Refugees are evacuating Syria and entering its geographically close neighbors, including Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq, and Egypt.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 24, 2013 1:12 PM

UNICEF workers have stated: "More than 600,000 have fled the conflict in Syria and registered as refugees. The number of Syrians who have left without registering is unknown but is likely to be hundreds of thousands. We do know, however, that children make up around half the number of refugees and that is certainly no way for any child to live their childhood."


Tags: Syria, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Refers to a geographic factor that influences the construction of a new building, highway, or other human creation

Refers to a geographic factor that influences the construction of a new building, highway, or other human creation | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, The Daily Yonder, a well-named site about life in rural America, brought us this unsettling map of broadband availability, or lack thereof, in the country's remote counties:

 

Truth is, the connectivity of U.S. cities is nothing to brag about either. A 2012 report from the New America Foundation found that residents of major American cities pay more money for slower Internet service than their counterparts in major cities around the world. Case in point: in Hong Kong, roughly $35 gets you access to a fiber-optics network with 500 Mbps download speed; in New York or Washington, it gets you a cable network at 25 Mbps.

 

The point is that broadband service in the United States is neither what it could be nor what it should be. Yes, the vast majority of Americans have access to very basic Internet service, but here the devil's in the details. Too many rural residents lack even minimal access; too many big cities lack the competition that would create world-class service; and for whatever reason — be it access, cost, quality, or something else — 100 million Americans don't subscribe to broadband service at all.

 

Here's an idea to change that: let's build a National Internet System under the National Highway System.

 

The concept isn't a new one — it was most recently floated out there by Benjamin Lennett and Sascha Meinrath of New America in early 2009 — but it remains viable and merits a comeback. Lennett and Meinrath argue that broadband access is a basic public service every bit as necessary as good roads. Since 90 percent of the country lives within 5 miles of a national highway, and since utility infrastructure is already planted along highway rights-of-way, bundling the network is the simplest and surest way for service to reach everyone.

 

Click headline to read more--


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Involves construction of a variant of a highway.

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Describes a benefit or opportunity related to human migration

Describes a benefit or opportunity related to human migration | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Santo Domingo – Officials from the Dominican Republic and The Bahamas will meet in Santo Domingo from October 29 to November 1st to hold bilateral talks regarding illegal fishing by Dominican nationals in Bahamian waters.

 

According to the Bahamas government, the problem of illegal fishing by Dominican nationals in been an ongoing and historical challenge to the neighboring country and is an issue that encompasses increasing economic, security, environmental and resource costs for The Bahamas.

 

The upcoming bilateral talks are aimed at solving the situation and advancing discussions on other issues of mutual benefit, such as illegal migration and trade relations, mainly in the area of agricultural imports, medical products and investment in tourism.

 


Via Αλιεία alieia.info
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Pros and cons of migration between Dominican Republic and Bahamas.

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Describes how jobs in a local community have changed over time

Describes how jobs in a local community have changed over time | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Triple PunditLinkedIn Aggregation Shows Green Jobs Surge Ahead in RecessionTriple PunditBy tracking the jobs and job changes among its 150 million members, LinkedIn has a clear picture into which industries are moving up and which are in decline.

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Recession time period has caused green jobs to soar.

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Describes how human settlement patterns have changed over time

Describes how human settlement patterns have changed over time | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

California’s rich diversity of Native American ethnic-and-language groups took shape during the past 12,000 years as migrating tribes settled first on the lush Pacific coast and then in progressively drier, less-vegetated habitats, says a new University of Utah study.


Via David Connolly
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Timeline of California's demographic development and patterns of occupation

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, September 5, 2013 11:35 AM

This article shows how human settlement patterns have changed over  time in California. We can see here that the culture of the native groups has changed over time due to their change in location which led to different resources, and eventually to changes in their overall civilizations. The article helps illustrate this idea through a map that shows where the groups have settled, so we can see what resources and changes in culture would have occurred over time. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 8:20 PM

This article discusses the patterns of culture in Cali, beginning from over 12,000 years ago.

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Describes how communities and states cooperate in providing relief efforts during and after natural disasters

Finland: Finland grants humanitarian aid to the victims of the earthquake in Turkey http://t.co/YhLj60kY #crisismanagement...

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Finnish cooperation with Turkey during humanitarian crisis following earthquake

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Gives an example of how culture and experience influence people's perceptions of places and regions

Gives an example of how culture and experience influence people's perceptions of places and regions | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Aaron Carapella, a Cherokee Indian, has taken it upon himself to create a map that shows the Tribal nations of the U.S. prior to European contact. The map is of the contiguous United States and displays the original native tribal names of roughly 595 tribes."


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. Jacobsen
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Native American culture and experience has different tenets than that of the European Americans.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 2:57 PM

The same area can be mapped in so many ways to tell such distinct stories.  This article is a great example of mapping being used to tell your own story.

Gladysthecoach Cruz's comment, July 25, 2013 6:49 PM
Love this great idea. But where would I start?
Ishola Adebayo's comment, August 2, 2013 8:59 AM
good
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Illustrates how nations are economically interdependent

Illustrates how nations are economically interdependent | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Abdullah Bin Nasser Bin Khalifa Al Thani agreed Wednesday to start negotiations for an investment agreement as the resource-rich Arab country ...

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Japan & Qatar's relations.

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Describes the impacts that human dietary choices have on the physical environment

What is a "Food Desert"? Find out what is being done to combat these nutritional wastelands on a trip to Philadelphia with First Lady Michelle Obama and Secr...

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Food deserts and human dietary activities

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Refers to transportation networks that allow goods and services to move between places

Refers to transportation networks that allow goods and services to move between places | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 11:43 AM

Great site to see how globaliztions takes a hold.  Many of the airport on the list of in the US and many are in China.  Not surprising that the two leading economic powers in the world have the busiest airports.  Also it is interening to see Las Vegas on the list.  Seems that people need a place to blow off some steam from working so hard.

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Mickayla Graham's curator insight, March 27, 4:14 AM

People and Economic Activity

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Describes the characteristics of an ecosystem on Earth's surface

Describes the characteristics of an ecosystem on Earth's surface | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"The incredible fractal pattern rivers (now dried out) were made as they spread into the salt flats of the arid Baja California Desert in Mexico."


Via Seth Dixon, Molly Diallo
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Describes drainage patterns in Baja California in Mexico.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:22 PM

This picture shows the drainage patterns and how the water drifted in many directions and not just in a single line. Water does not stay in a perfect straight line it flows and drifts in many directions. This is what the image is showing, how this particular water flows in many directions and branches off from one stream to another. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:46 AM

The Earth is an incredible place, we all know that. To see something like this form by itself is a wonder on its own.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:15 PM

The photographs of the salt flats in the Baja California Desert reveal dried out rivers that may have once fertilized the area to be able to sustain life.

Human-Environment Interaction speeds up desertification and makes once fertile lands useless.