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Cibereducação
Educational Technology and Cyberculture. Tecnologias na Educação e Cibercultura.
Curated by Luciana Viter
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Using laptops in class harms academic performance, study warns

Using laptops in class harms academic performance, study warns | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Researchers say undergraduates who use computers in class score half a grade lower than those who write notes

Via Peter Mellow, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 16, 12:45 PM
This is interesting.
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Free Technology for Teachers: TurboNote - Take & Share Notes While Watching Videos

Free Technology for Teachers: TurboNote - Take & Share Notes While Watching Videos | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

Via Maria Margarida Correia, Timo Ilomäki, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Sketch-noting and beyond: let your students choose their own note-taking strategy!

Sketch-noting and beyond: let your students choose their own note-taking strategy! | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Overview Effective note-taking is a vital skill for students, but by no means a simple one to teach or to learn. From my experience, students have to be constantly reminded to take notes during a r…

Via Fiona Price, Pilar Pamblanco, Javier Sánchez Bolado
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Estudantes trocam anotações em cadernos por foto da lousa no celular

Estudantes trocam anotações em cadernos por foto da lousa no celular | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Copiar a lousa? Para que, se dá para fotografá-la? Estudantes de São Paulo usam agora um novo método para registrar a matéria ensinada pelo professor: tirar foto do quadro ao invés de copiar o conteúdo à mão, no caderno.
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Evolution of Note Taking: New Forms

Evolution of Note Taking: New Forms | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

“ Note taking is a big topic among educators. How do we teach it to our students? What are the best methods? Is digital note taking worse than taking your notes on a piece of paper? I am a big advoca...”

 

Learn more:

 

- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Sketchnoting

 

- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity

 


Via Gust MEES, Sue Alexander, NikolaosKourakos
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Barbara Macfarlan's curator insight, August 21, 2015 7:09 PM

This sums it up nicely.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, August 22, 2015 5:52 AM

very interesting!

Suvrodeb Biswas's curator insight, August 24, 2015 5:11 AM

wow........

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Why writing by hand helps you learn

Why writing by hand helps you learn | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Handwriting notes is better than using a computer because it slows the learner down, writes Drake Baer.
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Tips for Taking Notes

Tips for Taking Notes | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Taking notes is an important part of studying, but how we take notes is equally important. Many students may have formed their note-taking habits before they even reach your class. However, there a...

Via Elke Höfler
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5 Programs That Make Digital Note-taking Easy

5 Programs That Make Digital Note-taking Easy | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
The 2008 Leadership and Learning Center reported on the importance of note-taking in the classroom: In schools where writing and note-taking were rarely implemented in science classes, approximatel...

Via Karen Bonanno
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Want to do better at exams? Take notes by hand - NOT on a laptop

Want to do better at exams? Take notes by hand - NOT on a laptop | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Students who write notes by hand during lectures perform better on exams than those who use laptops, according to a new study - even when the computers are disconnected from the Internet to avoid distractions.
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from The Funnily Enough
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Ink on Paper: Some Notes on Note-taking

Is it possible that laptops somehow impair learning -- or conversely, that pen and paper convey some subtle advantage in the classroom? Two psychological scientists, Pam Mueller of Princeton and Daniel Oppenheimer of UCLA, wondered if laptops, despite their plusses, might lead to a shallower kind of cognitive processing, and to lower quality learning. They decided to test the old and the new in a head-to-head contest.


Via mooderino
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How To Visualize Ideas, Information & Data Using Sketchnoting

How To Visualize Ideas, Information & Data Using Sketchnoting | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
If you’re a student or someone who takes notes a regular basis, you may be interested in a fun and even artistic movement called Sketchnoting. Sketchnoting is like notetaking, but it includes visual notes as well as words.
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Should Students Take Notes on a Computer? | Edudemic By Alex Summers

Should Students Take Notes on a Computer? | Edudemic By Alex Summers | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Today's educators must now ask themselves whether or not taking notes on a laptop has a detrimental effect on their student's performance.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Jan Swanepoel's curator insight, May 12, 8:48 PM
The basic act of writing something down sets off a process in our brains that essentially helps us remember things better. On the other hand, using a laptop in class to take notes during lectures can also enable students search for more information on the topic, maximising their exposure to the material.
David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 12, 9:11 PM

Yes. ;) Thanks to Tom D'Amico. 

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Owl Eyes: 12 Ways To Use Digital Text Annotation -

Owl Eyes: 12 Ways To Use Digital Text Annotation - | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
...
The post Owl Eyes: 12 Ways To Use Digital Text Annotation appeared first on TeachThought.
Via Javier Sánchez Bolado
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Take Note: How to Curate learning digitally

Take Note: How to Curate learning digitally | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

Note taking lies at the heart of curricula around the world. Beginning in elementary school, we teach students to "take notes" so that they can maintain a record of the content disseminated to them by the teacher. And yet, with mobile devices replacing paper notebooks, this process has become increasingly complex as students (and teachers) struggle to apply previous strategies to new tools.


In the past, I wrote about the 4Ss of Note Taking With Technology. Students should choose a system that:

Supports their learning needsAllows them to save across devicesPossesses search capabilitiesCan be shared


While I realize that younger students need scaffolding to learn any system, older students need to think beyond just transcribing information. In an age when simple facts can be Googled and students create with a combination of analog and digital tools, they need to think about note taking as an opportunity to curate and synthesize information so that they can make conclusions, build deeper understanding, and construct new knowledge. Whether students choose to handwrite, sketch, or type their notes, the challenge lies not in choosing, but in creating a system that allows them to ultimately curate, synthesize, and reflect on what they learn.


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How to Convert Writing to a Text Application on the iPad

How to Convert Writing to a Text Application on the iPad | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
The iPad's keyboard isn't always convenient for taking notes in class, but with the right note-taking app, you can write notes by hand and convert them into text when you're finished. ...
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Put Down the Pen & Paper: Benefits of Note Taking Using Technology

Put Down the Pen & Paper: Benefits of Note Taking Using Technology | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

There’s nothing like good ole pen and paper when it's time to take notes, right? Why are some students not as quick to move from a handy notebook to an app on an iPad or some other mobile device when taking notes?


Via Cindy Riley Klages
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17 Tips for Effective Note Taking (traditional meets technology)

17 Tips for Effective Note Taking (traditional meets technology) | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Follow our blog for product news, team updates, and tips for connecting with students and parents.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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A-Writer's curator insight, April 14, 2015 6:31 AM

http://www.a-writer.com/

Francisco Velasquez's curator insight, April 14, 2015 9:12 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Tony Guzman's curator insight, April 14, 2015 8:44 PM

This blog entry shares some excellent tips to share with your students about how to take efficient class notes.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century Teaching and Learning Resources
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PREPS: 5 steps for electronic notetaking success | SmartBlog on Education

PREPS: 5 steps for electronic notetaking success | SmartBlog on Education | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

In light of the unique nature of electronic notetaking, I’ve developed a system that I share in my new book “Reinventing Writing” that I call PREPS. In my opinion, there are two contenders for best notebook service: Evernote and One Note. I’ll mention them throughout this guide.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 23, 2014 7:10 PM

This is an outstanding review on the step of note taking with a BYOD approach for the 21st Century teaching and learning environments.

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Ten reasons we should ditch university lectures

Ten reasons we should ditch university lectures | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Students have just one chance to hear a lecture - and mostly it's just someone reading their notes aloud

Via Alastair Creelman
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Take 30 Seconds After Learning Something to Write Important Points

Take 30 Seconds After Learning Something to Write Important Points | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Most of us are learning new stuff everyday. That might be from lectures, meetings, or even just a good podcast. If you want to really ingrain that experience in your mind, writer Robyn Scott suggests writing down a short, 30 seconds note.
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10 Note Taking Tips for The 21st Century Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Note Taking Tips for The 21st Century Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/01/10-note-taking-tips-for-21st-century.html

 

January 11, 2014
I am presently reading a book entitled " Orality and Literacy" by Walter Ong in which Ong provides an insightful analysis of the two concepts: oral cultures and literate ( both chirographic, typographic, and later on electronic ) cultures. Ong argues that oral cultures were not able to develop logical and conceptual thought and that their thinking was purely operational and situational.  Without a written language to store and save knowledge , there was no referential data for others to reflect and build on. Even for recollections, oral people drew on the heavy use of rhythmic patterns :

In a primary oral culture, to solve effectively the problem of retaining and retrieving carefully articulated thought, you have to do your thinking in mnemonic patterns, shaped for ready oral recurrence. Your thought must come into being in heavily rhythmic, balanced patterns, in repetitions or antitheses, in alliterations and assonances, in epithetic and other formulary expressions, in standard thematic settings (the assembly, the meal, the duel, the hero’s ‘helper’, and so on), in proverbs which are constantly heard by everyone so that they come to mind readily and which themselves are patterned for retention and ready recall, or in other mnemonic form.

Anyway, I will share with you a review of this book as soon as I finish reading it. However, what I want to draw your attention to today is the power of note taking in consolidating our insights and increasing our retention powers, something which Ong has indirectly alluded to when he talked about the intellectual revolution spurred by the invention of the writing system. The visual below clicks in with some of what Ong talked about. It basically features some very interesting facts about the importance of note taking.

Here are some interesting highlights from it :
Humans forget things easily, and the more time passes the more we forget. Only 10 percent of an audio lecture may last in memory, but students who take and review their notes can recall about 80% of a lecture.University of Washington research suggests that physical writing ( chirographic ) activates regions of the brain that involve thinking, language and working memory.Read on to learn more about the importance of note taking.


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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