Linguagem Virtual
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Linguagem Virtual
Educational Technology and Cyberculture. Tecnologias na Educação e Cibercultura.
Curated by Luciana Viter
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Tipos de memoria: ¿cómo almacena los recuerdos el cerebro?

Tipos de memoria: ¿cómo almacena los recuerdos el cerebro? | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Describimos los diferentes tipos de memoria y cómo el cerebro humano guarda la información que percibimos en recuerdos. Memoria episódica, a cort

Via Mariano Fernandez S.
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Cognitive Load Theory: Making learning more effective

Cognitive Load Theory: Making learning more effective | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Cognitive Load Theory builds upon the widely accepted model of human information processing shown in Figure 1 (this was published by Richard Atkinson and Richard Shiffrin in 1968.)

It describes the process as having three main parts: sensory memory, working memory and long-term memory. Since then, many researchers have added to our understanding of this concept, but the basic model remains the same.

Via Edumorfosis, NikolaosKourakos
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18007490917 Dell Support Phone Number's curator insight, March 21, 12:14 PM
How to setup Dell Wireless Printer? http://goo.gl/nN9tuJ Installing a Dell #wireless_printer in your workplace enables your employees and co-workers to send print jobs without leaving their workspace. Setting up a Wi-Fi-capable printer can also help to Dial 1 (800) 749 0917 Toll Free Number
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Education 2.0 & 3.0
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What’s Your Memory Style?

What’s Your Memory Style? | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it

Neuroscience News has recent neuroscience research articles, brain research news, neurology studies and neuroscience resources for neuroscientists, students, and science fans and is always free to join.


Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Learning & Mind & Brain
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Brain Areas Responsible for Working Memory are Changing All the Time

Brain Areas Responsible for Working Memory are Changing All the Time | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Our understanding of how a key part of the human brain works may be wrong. That’s the conclusion of a team at Oxford University’s Centre for Human Brain Activity (OHBA), published in journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences.

Until now, it was thought that working memory – the way in which we deal with and respond to immediate demands – was underpinned by stable brain patterns. The OHBA team discovered that instead, the areas of the brain responsible for working memory are changing all the time.

Dr Mark Stokes, who led the research, explained: ‘This raises an important question: How can we keep a stable thought in mind while brain activity is constantly changing?’

Previously it was believed that in order to carry out a task, there would be constant brain activity related to the goal of that task. In a review of fifty years of studies using monkeys, the OHBA team found that instead there were periods when there was no brain activity related to the goal. Yet, as soon as it was necessary, these ‘activity-silent’ periods ended and the brain activity could be observed again.

Dr Stokes said: ‘Say you are looking for your coffee cup. Before, the assumption was that there was a constant piece of activity that related to that idea of ‘coffee cup.’ But as you start to walk around the house looking for it, your brain also has to process that task. If you can stop the ‘coffee cup’ activity while the brain works on navigating round the house, then start it again when you see the cup, that’s more efficient.

‘This way of operating has benefits. The brain uses around 20% of the energy you’re burning each day, but it’s difficult to get that energy into the brain. Every bit of brain activity is using some of that, so if you can temporarily suspend some activity in your working memory the energy can be applied to an immediately relevant task.

‘This may mean that working memory is closer to long-term memory in the way it functions. You may be able to remember your tenth birthday, but there is no constant pattern of brain activity that is your tenth birthday memory.

‘What we don’t know is how the brain is retaining that information in a stable way in the activity-silent periods. There must be an underlying mechanism, but it is difficult to detect that mechanism because the equipment we use at the moment measures brain activity – it can’t see what isn’t active.

‘The challenge for the future is developing new ways to measure the underlying activity-silent states that could be important for working memory.’

Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Enhancing Short-Term Memory: 5 Strategies For eLearning Professionals

Enhancing Short-Term Memory: 5 Strategies For eLearning Professionals | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Wondering What eLearning Professionals Should Know About Short-Τerm Μemory? Check the Enhancing Short-Term Memory: 5 Strategies For eLearning Professionals

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Daily Magazine
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Tips for Memorizing a Speech #Infographic

Tips for Memorizing a Speech #Infographic | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Tips for Memorizing a Speech Infographic presents effective ways of speech memorizing.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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maripax62's curator insight, January 17, 2015 11:16 AM

Para os que se pensen presentar as diferentes eleccións destes próximos anos 

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Creative teaching and learning
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For years we've been telling kids to sit still and pay attention. That's all ... - Slate Magazine

For years we've been telling kids to sit still and pay attention. That's all ... - Slate Magazine | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it

"Today's educational technology often presents itself as a radical departure from the tired practices of traditional instruction ..."

©


Via Leona Ungerer
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from An Eye on New Media
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Is Facebook making us forget? Study shows that taking pictures ruin memories

Is Facebook making us forget? Study shows that taking pictures ruin memories | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Cultural commentators and itinerant moaners have often complained that our obsession with taking pictures stops us from experiencing the moment, and now scientists are saying that our snap-happy habits may also be ruining our memory.

Via Ken Morrison
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Ken Morrison's curator insight, March 30, 2014 6:40 AM

This study says that in general, taking photos decreases our memory of events.  It also finds that zooming in on objects seems to decrease this effect.  Some variables that need to be examined further include the frequency of viewing our photos after the event, as well as how many times your social network comments/likes a photo if posted online. Note: I added the last suggested research variable

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Education Technology Tips Learning Teaching Healthcare Life
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Improving Working Memory: How the Science of Retention Can Enhance All Aspects of Learning

Improving Working Memory: How the Science of Retention Can Enhance All Aspects of Learning | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Do you really know something if you can’t remember it?

Via Maria Margarida Correia, luigi vico
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Why Music Helps You Memorize Items

Why Music Helps You Memorize Items | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
If grade school has taught us anything, it's that turning a list of items into a song is a great way to remember things. That same basic process works just as well in adulthood, and The Wall Street Journal explains why.
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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10 Unforgettable Facts About Human Memory

10 Unforgettable Facts About Human Memory | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Here are 10 facts about human memory that you’ll never forget.
Via Lesley Rodgers, Bobby Dillard, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Docentes
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De la necesidad de memorizarlo todo a la necesidad de no memorizar nada

De la necesidad de memorizarlo todo a la necesidad de no memorizar nada | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Creo que, en Educación, nos estamos pasando de frenada. Con tanta innovación desinnovadora y postulados de maximización de realidades inexistentes, los bandos

Via Marta Torán, cristina guadalupe
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Marta Torán's curator insight, April 25, 2:40 PM
Estoy de acuerdo con la reflexión de Jordi Martí. Entre ambas posturas hay, como él dice, mucha capacidad de maniobra.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from the plastic brain
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Memory Replay Prioritizes High-Reward Memories

Memory Replay Prioritizes High-Reward Memories | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Why do we remember some events, places and things, but not others? Our brains prioritize rewarding memories over others, and reinforce them by replaying them when we are at rest, according to new research from the University of California, Davis, Center for Neuroscience, published Feb. 11 in the journal Neuron.

Via iPamba
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7 memory skills that will make you smarter

7 memory skills that will make you smarter | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Learning ability is probably the most important...

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Gilbert C FAURE
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Daily Magazine
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Your Brain Actually Doesn’t Suck At Passwords

Your Brain Actually Doesn’t Suck At Passwords | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Last year, two researchers asked a group of volunteers to log into a website 90 times over the span of ten days, using whatever password the volunteers chose.

After entering their password, the website showed the volunteers a short security code, made of either four random letters or two random words, and asked them to type it. Throughout the ten-day experiment, the site added more letters and words to the code—up to 12 random letters or six random words—and the security code would take just a little longer to be displayed, prompting the participants to remember it themselves before it appeared.

At the end of the experiment, and three days after the last login, a whopping 94 percent of the test subjects were able to remember from memory their random code word or phrase, which were seemingly nonsensical strings of characters like “zljndjjgjana” or meaningless phrases like “gaze sloth laugh grace relic born.”

Without the volunteers knowing, the researchers had tricked their minds.
“The words are branded into my brain,” one participant said, according to the researchers.

Via Wildcat2030, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from A Change in Perspective
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Mnemonics: The Forgotten Art of Memory

Mnemonics: The Forgotten Art of Memory | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Mnemonics are a forgotten art of memory that today is only practiced among a small group of mental athletes and memory experts. Here's a great introduction to the technique.

Via Bobby Dillard
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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:49 AM

Remember when?   Remember how? Remember what?  Oh heck, just remember....

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Teaching English-My Bits 'n Pieces
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Repetition Doesn’t Work: Better Ways to Train Your Memory

Repetition Doesn’t Work: Better Ways to Train Your Memory | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
A team of scientists recently discovered that repetition is a terrible way to memorize information—and their findings highlight much better strategies.
Via Gina Paschalidou
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3 Tricks to Defeat Memory Block

3 Tricks to Defeat Memory Block | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Follow these tips and your speech will go smoother, even if you forget some of it.
Drawing a blank when you’re giving a speech in front an audience can be a traumatic experience.
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
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How does memory work? | The Edynco blog

How does memory work? | The Edynco blog | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it

Via Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 23, 2014 9:32 AM

Interactive learning map that shows how we get and keep new information

David Baker's curator insight, March 24, 2014 3:20 PM

Memory and the interactive modeling of both how it works and how to support memory are topics of interest for teachers.

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:54 PM

If we want to help our students to learn efficiently, we should know something about functioning of our memory.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Teach and tech
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How Google Is Changing Your Memory - Edudemic

How Google Is Changing Your Memory - Edudemic | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
Memorization sometimes gets a bad rap in the education world. Yes, education IS way more than just memorizing facts, dates, formulas, spellings, and pronunciations.

Via Luísa Lima
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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Why is My Teen So Forgetful?

Why is My Teen So Forgetful? | Linguagem Virtual | Scoop.it
David Wilcox, of Musings on the Middle Years of Education, and I have worked together to create an infographic about the teen brain. It is based on a blog post he wrote over a year ago (Click here ...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Bill Moody's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:53 AM

Not every teen but interesting graphic on why the teen mind appears so different