Cibereducação
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Cibereducação
Educational Technology and Cyberculture. Tecnologias na Educação e Cibercultura.
Curated by Luciana Viter
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Purposeful Pedagogy
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Rethinking Intelligence: How Does Imagination Measure Up?

Rethinking Intelligence: How Does Imagination Measure Up? | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists and psychologists are trying to develop a new way of thinking about intelligence, one that includes kids who don't always shine in the

Via Sandeep Gautam, Dean J. Fusto
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Aditya Keshav's comment, July 14, 12:57 AM
Things Highly Influential People Always do to convince others - http://sco.lt/6bGbQH
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 14, 2:30 PM
I am reading Paul Ricoeur and his phenomenology promotes the idea of imagining as essential to communicating and interpreting. Kaufmann proposed four ways to help children imagine: solitary reflection time, being able to stop something that is not being enjoyed, diverse experiences, and think of each person as exceptional. This applies to adults, as well. If children see adults doing these things, maybe it would be easier for them to imagine themselves doing them, as well.
Scott Olson's curator insight, July 17, 12:31 PM
One thing I try to impart to kids.  Everyone has a strength. Someone may be booksmart, an athlete etc.  It does not make one person better than the other because of their strength.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Why IQ matters more than grit

Why IQ matters more than grit | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
An intelligence researcher explains some uncomfortable truths about IQ.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Octopus Genome Reveals Secrets to Complex Intelligence

Octopus Genome Reveals Secrets to Complex Intelligence | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
The elusive octopus genome has finally been untangled, which should allow scientists to discover answers to long-mysterious questions about the animal's alienlike physiology: How does it camouflage itself so expertly? How does it control—and regenerate—those eight flexible arms and thousands of suckers? And, most vexing: How did a relative of the snail get to be so incredibly smart—able to learn quickly, solve puzzles and even use tools?

The findings, published today in Nature, reveal a vast, unexplored landscape full of novel genes, unlikely rearrangements—and some evolutionary solutions that look remarkably similar to those found in humans. (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.)

With the largest-known genome in the invertebrate world—similar in size to that of a house cat (2.7 billion base pairs) and with more genes (33,000) than humans (20,000 to 25,000)—the octopus sequence has long been known to be large and confusing. Even without a genetic map, these animals and their cephalopod cousins (squids, cuttlefishes and nautiluses) have been common subjects for neurobiology and pharmacology research. But a sequence for this group of mollusks has been "sorely needed," says Annie Lindgren, a cephalopod researcher at Portland State University who was not involved in the new research. "Think about trying to assemble a puzzle, picture side down," she says of octopus research to date. "A genome gives us a picture to work with."

Via Wildcat2030
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increaseforeach's comment, August 21, 2015 2:29 AM
Computers - to most of us - are a relatively simple machines to purchase, operate, and (for the most part) understand.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Ignore the IQ test: your level of intelligence is not fixed for life

Ignore the IQ test: your level of intelligence is not fixed for life | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
We’re getting more stupid. That’s one point made in a recent article in the New Scientist, reporting on a gradual decline in IQs in developed countries such as the UK, Australia and the Netherlands. Such research feeds into a long-held fascination with testing human intelligence. Yet such debates are too focused on IQ as a life-long trait that can’t be changed. Other research is beginning to show the opposite.

The concept of testing intelligence was first successfuly devised by French psychologists in the early 1900s to help describe differences in how well and quickly children learn at school. But it is now frequently used to explain that difference – that we all have a fixed and inherent level of intelligence that limits how fast we can learn.

Defined loosely, intelligence refers to our ability to learn quickly and adapt to new situations. IQ tests measure our vocabulary, our ability to problem-solve, reason logically and so on.

But what many people fail to understand is that if IQ tests measured only our skills at these particular tasks, no one would be interested in our score. The score is interesting only because it is thought to be fixed for life.

Who is getting smarter?

Standardised IQ tests used by clinical psychologists for diagnostic purposes, such as the Weschler scale, are designed in such a way that it is not easy to prepare for them. The contents are kept surprisingly secret and they are changed regularly. The score given for an individual is a relative one, adjusted based on the performance of people of the same age.

But even as we become better educated and more skillful at the types of tasks measured on IQ tests (a phenomenon known as the “Flynn effect”, after James Fylnn who first noted it) our IQs stay pretty much the same. This is because the IQ scoring system takes into account the amount of improvement expected over time, and then discounts it. This type of score is called a “standardised score” – it hides your true score and merely represents your standing in relation to your peers who have also been getting smarter at about the same rate.

This apparent stability in IQ scores makes intelligence look relatively constant, whereas in fact we are all becoming more intelligent across and within our lifetimes. The IQ test and the IQ scoring system are constantly adjusted to ensure that the average IQ remains at 100, despite a well-noted increase in intellectual ability worldwide.


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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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The Secret To Creativity, Intelligence, And Scientific Thinking

The Secret To Creativity, Intelligence, And Scientific Thinking | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
Research shows that creativity and intelligence are linked with the physical connections in our brains. Here's how to connect the dots.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Homo Prospectus: We Aren’t Built to Live in the Moment- our brain is always predicting the future #newBook

Homo Prospectus: We Aren’t Built to Live in the Moment- our brain is always predicting the future #newBook | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

What best distinguishes our species is an ability that scientists are just beginning to appreciate: We contemplate the future. Our singular foresight created civilization and sustains society. It usually lifts our spirits, but it’s also the source of most depression and anxiety, whether we’re evaluating our own lives or worrying about the nation. Other animals have springtime rituals for educating the young, but only we subject them to “commencement” speeches grandly informing them that today is the first day of the rest of their lives.


Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, June 6, 6:42 AM

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

This article provides a short summary of this new book, homo prospectus. It sheds light into how our brain works and why it is in fact prediction machine, always predicting the future. 

 

I wrote about a similar book in the past, On Intelligence, which I also strongly recommend.

http://fmcs.digital/blog/on-intelligence-mustread-to-understand-frontal-cortex-architecture-what-makes-us-intelligent/ 

 

For more on intelligence posts I wrote, look here: http://fmcs.digital/blog/tag/intelligence/ 

Dave berkeley's curator insight, June 8, 8:49 AM
Always striving to live in the moment is sometimes difficult. I would add our brain also wants to dwell on the past as well.What say you?
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Did human-like intelligence evolve to care for helpless babies? : NewsCenter

Did human-like intelligence evolve to care for helpless babies? : NewsCenter | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that human intelligence may have evolved in response to the demands of caring for infants.

Via Scott R. Furtwengler, PhD
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Effective Education
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What Does It Mean To Be Intelligent?

What Does It Mean To Be Intelligent? | Cibereducação | Scoop.it

It is actually pretty difficult to explain an individual’s perception of intelligence. You may also find it surprising that your friends and colleagues will define intelligence, or smart, differently than you do. Cited From: http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/what-does-it-mean-to-be-intelligent/#ixzz3Osyx6All


Via Sharrock, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed

New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed | Cibereducação | Scoop.it
New research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a “growth mindset” can help many kids understand their true potential.

Via Claudia M. Reder
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