Lincoln Hall - Mountaineer
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Lincoln Hall (climber) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lincoln Ross Hall, OAM (19 December 1955 – 20 March 2012) was a veteran Australian mountain climber, adventurer, author and philanthropist. Hall was part of the first Australian expedition to climb Mount Everest in 1984, which successfully forged a new route, and he reached the summit of the mountain on his second attempt in 2006, miraculously surviving the night at 8700 metres on descent.

Hall lived in the Blue Mountains in New South Wales, Australia with his wife and two sons and was a founding Director of the Australian Himalayan Foundation.[1] He was the author of seven books.

In 1987 Hall was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia for service to mountaineering and in 2010 he won the Australian Geographic Society's Lifetime of Adventure award.[2] He was a life member of the Australian National University Mountaineering Club. He died of mesothelioma aged 56 on 20 March 2012.

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Summit Murder Mystery Series: Lincoln Hall, Survivor of Mt. Everest's Death Zone, Has Died

Summit Murder Mystery Series: Lincoln Hall, Survivor of Mt. Everest's Death Zone, Has Died | Lincoln Hall - Mountaineer | Scoop.it
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Mount Everest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mount Everest (Nepali: सगरमाथा, Sagarmāthā; Tibetan: ཇོ་མོ་གླང་མWylie: jo mo glang ma; Chomolungma[4][5][6][7] or Qomolangma /ˈmˌlɑːŋmə/ CHOH-moh-LAHNG-mə,[7][8] "Holy Mother"; Chinese: 珠穆朗玛峰; pinyin: Zhūmùlǎngmǎ Fēng;[9]) is the Earth's highest mountain, with a peak at 8,848 metres (29,029 ft) above sea level. It is located in the Mahalangur section of the Himalayas. The international border between China and Nepal runs across the precise summit point.[citation needed] Its massif includes neighboring peaks Lhotse, 8,516 m (27,940 ft); Nuptse, 7,855 m (25,771 ft) and Changtse, 7,580 m (24,870 ft).

In 1856, the Great Trigonometric Survey of British India established the first published height of Everest, then known as Peak XV, at 29,002 ft (8,840 m). In 1865, Everest was given its official English name by the Royal Geographical Society upon a recommendation by Andrew Waugh, the British Surveyor General of India. Waugh named the mountain after his predecessor in the post, Sir George Everest. Although Tibetans had called Everest "Chomolungma" for centuries, Waugh was unaware of this because Nepal and Tibet were closed to foreigners.

Mount Everest attracts many highly experienced mountaineers as well as capable climbers willing to hire professional guides. While not posing substantial technical climbing challenges on the standard route, Everest presents dangers such as altitude sickness, weather and wind.

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I Shouldn't Be Alive - Left for Dead on Everest

50 year-old Australian mountaineer Lincoln Hall attempted to climb Everest in 1984 but didn't reach the summit. Now, 22 years later, he has a second chance.
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