Like Water For Ch...
Follow
Find
142 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

General Logon Page

Dana Jourdan's insight:

The article, "Mexican Revolution," reveals the problems that started the Mexican Revolution. This revolution was started because of economic and political problems. There were many stages of this war and they were all very bloody, leaving Mexican citizens feeling uncomfortable. Their sense of comfort was not there because they felt they were not safe. The reason for the economic terrible that helped fuel the revolution was the depression that hit Mexico. The political problems started with changing of political power. These problems lead to a development of the rebels and the war.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition

Encyclopædia Britannica Online School Edition | Like Water For Chocolate: Mexican Culture | Scoop.it
Dana Jourdan's insight:

This article talks about what was going on in Mexico before the Mexican Revolution. Diaz was the leader before the revolution took place. Diaz lead a revolt to not reelect Lerdo, the previous president. Diaz won the election because he made a plan to help Mexico grow that he used in the election. The plan included things to help the economy and social progress. But even his money plan could not help the country because of the influences of America and Europe. Land owners were not affected as much by the economic times as others were. The country had extremely low wages for workers. Even though Diaz was doing an okay job, people started to want a new leader at the turn of the century. This is when the Mexican Revolution began to form.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Rick Bayless & Frontera News: Gourmet Mexican Cooking - Rick Bayless | Frontera

Rick Bayless & Frontera News: Gourmet Mexican Cooking - Rick Bayless | Frontera | Like Water For Chocolate: Mexican Culture | Scoop.it
Dana Jourdan's insight:

Rick Bayless has done an excellent job with his Frontera company. He has many products and restaurants that are a part of Frontera. I love how he has several traditional Mexican recipes that he is willing to share. He is very smart for making a business out of his passion, Mexican food.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Like Water for Chocolate

Like Water for Chocolate | Like Water For Chocolate: Mexican Culture | Scoop.it
Dana Jourdan's insight:

In Like Water for Chocolate, Tita is the out cast of her family. She was born crying because of onions. Because her mother could not breast feed her, Tita was raised by their family chief, Nacha, and became an amazing cook. Cooking was Tita’s way to cope with her problems. Tita couldn’t marry because she was the youngest daughter in her family so her love, Pedro, married her sister in hopes to be closer to Tita. Tita’s mother would not even allow Tita and Pedro to be anywhere near each other, though. After this, it was discovered by Tita’s other sister that whatever emotion Tita had when cooking a dish, was felt by the person eating the dish. Tita’s sister had a child and couldn't breast feed so Tita developed a bond to him by feeding him and was devastated when Pedro’s family was force by her mother to move. Now there was no male on the ranch but when the soldiers came they did not destroy the ranch to much the first time because Tita’s sister ran away with a soldier. Because the soldiers killed all her birds, Tita had a breakdown. Her mom called John to take her to a mental institue but John took Tita to his house because he knew she was not crazy. Tita went back to care for her mother who was sick and her mother thought Tita was going to poison her. After her mother dies, John wants to marry her but Pedro and Tita rekindled their love and John was too nice to break them up. Pedro and Tita make love and knew they are meant to be together. Her mother didn’t like this so her spirit came back and almost killed Pedro and made Tita lose the child they conceived that night. Tita nursed Pedro back to health and Tita called off her engagement. Pedro and Tita’s sister had a daughter who was supposed to have had a life like Tita but Tita and Pedro made sure that did not happen. The daughter married John’s son. Tita and Pedro died making love and continued their love as spirits.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Map of Mexico

Map of Mexico | Like Water For Chocolate: Mexican Culture | Scoop.it
Dana Jourdan's insight:

Mexico is rich in culture and there are lots of old school traditions. Family is very important in Mexican culture and Mexican familys typically do a lot together, like cooking. Food is a large part of Mexican culture. Traditional Mexican cooking uses many flavors and fresh ingredients.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Life of Pi

Life of Pi | Like Water For Chocolate: Mexican Culture | Scoop.it
Dana Jourdan's insight:

I would read Life of Pi next because it is a magical realism book from India, not Mexico. I would like to see how other countries use magical realism in their literature. Also the movie is coming out and it would be nice to read the book before I see the movie. This book sounds interesting because Pi has to survive with animals that could kill him on a little life boat.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Mexican chefs keeping kitchen traditions alive

Mexican chefs keeping kitchen traditions alive | Like Water For Chocolate: Mexican Culture | Scoop.it
Dana Jourdan's insight:

This article talks about how Mexican food has evolved form its traditional state for the worse. It talks about how traditional Mexican food has changed to adapt to popular demand. It has changed for the worse because with the changes that were made to the food, the food became unhealthy. This is why Mexican food is now under fire. One man says that traditional Mexican food is not unhealthy. He says traditional Mexican food is natural, straight from the farm, and uses old school techniques that do not make the food as unhealthy. The article says Mexicans are offended by the stereotype of their food being bad for people or that they are lazy. This stereotype is contradicted if you go to a market because you can see all the fresh foods.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

AT DINNER WITH LAURA ESQUIVEL; Sensing the Spirit In All Things, Seen and Unseen - New York Times

Dana Jourdan's insight:

This article summarizes an interview of Laura Esquivel. It talks about her demeanor as she walks into the interview. Esquivel was in the United States for the premier of Like Water for Chocolate, the movie. The interview also talks about her background, about how she was a schoolteacher and about her family background. It talks about how she cooks and how cooking is one of the ways she relaxes. The thing that interests her the most about cooking is watching the spirit come down onto the food and transform it. Laura talks about the flavors of Mexican cooking. She says she likes old school cooking; like, she does not like the invention of the microwave.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Rick Bayless on Mexico & the Next Season of his PBS

Dana Jourdan's insight:

This movie talks about the traditions of Mexican food. It talks about how simple some Mexican dishes are. Rick Bayless travels to different markets and roadside food stands and makes his version of some of the dishes he finds at these places. When making the dishes, he give some of the background behind the Mexican dish. He makes a chicken like roadside Mexican chicken and a version of mole. When he goes to the markets and the roadside food stands, he emphasizes that an open fire is a traditional way to cook Mexican food. Keeping things simple, he says, is also very common in Mexican cooking. He also stresses the use of fresh ingredients and spices.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dana Jourdan
Scoop.it!

Magical Realism

Dana Jourdan's insight:

This article talks about the history of magical realism. Magical realism started in Europe during the surrealist movement. It gained the attention of Latin America and became a big part of Latin American writing. In a lot of work that features magical realism, political issues are addressed. Writing directly about political issues was dangerous in Latin America, so this was a writers way to write about political issues. Magical realism is a writing style that shows things that would not happen in real life; it expands the truth. Typically, it deals with super natural powers. This article gives examples of magical realism in famous magical realism works. This article also says that magical realism has expanded outside of Latin America.

more...
No comment yet.