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Forensic Science for Kids

Forensic Science for Kids | lifehereonearth | Scoop.it
Kids love to learn about forensic science. Learn about three great forensic science activities for kids.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Lisa Burton
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 10, 2013 3:38 AM

Capture the students investigatory interests.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, August 10, 2013 3:41 AM
I was lucky enough to teach a course at the Smithsonian with this theme. You can add cryptology and literature, and create a drama to go with it.
Angelita Jagla's curator insight, August 14, 2013 10:52 PM

I love the setting...crime scene. This would definitely get the attention of my fourth grade students.

Rescooped by Lisa Burton from STEM Connections
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Forensic Science for Kids

Forensic Science for Kids | lifehereonearth | Scoop.it
Kids love to learn about forensic science. Learn about three great forensic science activities for kids.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 10, 2013 3:38 AM

Capture the students investigatory interests.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, August 10, 2013 3:41 AM
I was lucky enough to teach a course at the Smithsonian with this theme. You can add cryptology and literature, and create a drama to go with it.
Angelita Jagla's curator insight, August 14, 2013 10:52 PM

I love the setting...crime scene. This would definitely get the attention of my fourth grade students.

Rescooped by Lisa Burton from IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN
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12-year-old boy is invited by delegates of the United Nations to discuss conservation and environmental protection #idlenomore

12-year-old boy is invited by delegates of the United Nations to discuss conservation and environmental protection #idlenomore | lifehereonearth | Scoop.it

It isn’t every day that a 12-year-old boy is invited by delegates of the United Nations to discuss conservation and environmental protection efforts, but Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, of Boulder, Colorado isn’t your average seventh grader. 


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, April 20, 2013 1:51 PM

This dedicated and impressive young man expresses his vision with a compelling and contagious confidence. He seems, even at age 12, to be a natural leader. He is willing to stand up and speak truth to power. “Stand with me,” he said, “and we can become a force to change the direction we are headed. When we all become leaders for the good of all humanity, we will create a world of beauty, equality, light and love.” - Read more by Doug Harris


Rescooped by Lisa Burton from STEM Connections
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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | lifehereonearth | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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The Myth of Human Progress and the Collapse of Complex Societies - Truth-Out

The Myth of Human Progress and the Collapse of Complex Societies - Truth-Out | lifehereonearth | Scoop.it
The Myth of Human Progress and the Collapse of Complex Societies Truth-Out And those on the ship, on some level, know they are doomed—just as many of us know that a consumer culture based on corporate profit, limitless exploitation and the...
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Rescooped by Lisa Burton from Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo
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Wade Davis: The worldwide web of belief and ritual

TED Talks Anthropologist Wade Davis muses on the worldwide web of belief and ritual that makes us human.

Via axelletess, eloisa
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